An UnLimited Media Bulletin
Friday 20 December 2013

 
TODAY'S TOP STORY: Having tried on a few various domain names for size in countries all around the world over the course of this year (and mostly the last week and a half), The Pirate Bay has returned to its Swedish web address. Well, it's always nice to put on a familiar jumper at Christmas. As much previously reported, having switched to it from a .org domain in 2012 after the US authorities seized MegaUpload's also... [READ MORE]
 
ARTISTS OF THE YEAR: Each weekday in the run up to the Christmas break, we've been revealing our ten favourite artists of the year. To see the full list, check this page. Our final artist is Janelle Monáe... As well as being the last to feature in this year's Artists Of The Year rundown, Janelle Monáe is also the first returning artist we've ever had in our customary end-of-calendar best artists review, having previously made the... [READ MORE]
 
FESTIVE CLUB TIPS: With Christmas coming up next week, you'll have a few days to relax with family and to recover from the strains of the Christmas party season. But with the biggest party night of the year fast approaching, you'll need to get back on the horse as soon as you can. So, to get you limbered up, I've selected a couple of nights worth checking out during the festive break, as well as my picks of the New... [READ MORE]
 
THE YEAR IN BEEFS: It's the week before Christmas and everyone's in a good mood, so there are no beefs to be had. No, let me stop you there, there are absolutely none. Not even one. So, instead of dissecting a single event from the last seven days this week, we're going to look back at some of our favourite beefs of 2013. And they're all top quality prime beefs too, there's no horse meat here... [READ MORE]
 
TOP STORIES The Pirate Bay returns to Swedish domain name
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LEGAL Belfast courts hand down suspended sentences to file-sharing site operators
Katherine Jackson disputes legal costs claimed by AEG
Weird Al Yankovic settles lawsuit with Sony Music
Beatles release confirms intricacies of copyright extension
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DEALS William Morris Endeavour acquires IMG
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LIVE BUSINESS Investigation underway after West End theatre ceiling collapses on audience
Council approves Finsbury Park for Live Nation's Wireless, though not all locals happy
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MEDIA Matt Willis to join Eastenders
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INDUSTRY PEOPLE CMU Insights evening course provides complete overview of the music business in 2014
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ARTIST NEWS Adele gets MBE
Dev Hynes rethinks donations drive following NYC fire
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RELEASES Jamie xx, Sampha preview new tracks
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GIGS & FESTIVALS Danny Brown announces UK shows
Festival line-up update: Glastonbury, Liverpool Psych Fest, Fresh Island, Off The Tracks
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AND FINALLY... CMU Beef Of The Week #187: The year in beefs
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Click JUMP to skip direct to a section of this email or ONLINE to read and share stories on the CMU website (JUMP option may not work in all email readers). For regular updates from Team CMU follow us on Twitter, Facebook or Tumblr.
 
 
WARP RECORDS - JUNIOR LICENSING MANAGER
Warp is looking for a Junior Licensing Manager to join the Licensing team. Your role will be to help us deliver exceptional licensing opportunities for our artists across all aspects of licensing for film, TV, advertising, videogames and compilations projects worldwide for Warp.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
!K7 LABEL GROUP - DIGITAL SALES & MARKETING MANAGER
Berlin-based !K7 Label Group is looking for an experienced digital sales and marketing professional to help direct, implement and manage robust digital sales and online marketing strategies for both our in-house and partner labels.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
NETTWERK RECORDS - DIGITAL MANAGER
Excellent opportunity for creative and passionate Digital Manager to join Nettwerk Records. The individual must have at least 18 months of previous experience with planning and managing digital marketing campaigns. Familiarity with general music business structure, industry monetization streams and indie label mentality.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
PRS FOR MUSIC - INTERNATIONAL LICENSING ANALYST
PRS for Music is looking to recruit an International Licensing Analyst. The Analyst role is to assist in the maximising of income from new business opportunities outside the UK and in the PRS Agency territories, whilst ensuring members’ rights remain appropriately represented and valued.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
PRS FOR MUSIC - LIBRARY PUBLISHER ACCOUNT MANAGER
PRS for Music is looking to recruit a Library Publisher Account Manager who will work closely with both our library and production members and the PRS for Music team to develop, own and deliver a clearly defined and competitive Production Music strategy.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
PRS FOR MUSIC - CLASSICAL ACCOUNT MANAGER
PRS for Music is looking to recruit a Classical Account Manager to work closely with its Classical Music members, the PRS for Music management and the broader music community. They will set up and manage a Classical Music Advisory Group and by actively engaging with the community, develop, own and deliver a clearly defined Classical Music strategy.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
PROPER MUSIC DISTRIBUTION - LABEL MANAGER
Proper Music Distribution Limited is the largest independent music distributor in the UK and winner of Music Week's Distributor of the Year award for 2009, 2010 and 2012. We are looking for an organised, knowledgable and creative Label Manager to join our team.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
LIVE NATION - EVENT TICKETING MANAGER
The purpose of this role is to maximise ticket sales for Live Nation events by providing effective ticketing information and advice; and proactively managing inventory, ticket agents and allocations Live Nation Music UK is part of Live Nation Entertainment, the largest live entertainment company in the world, consisting of five businesses: concert promotion and venue operations, sponsorship, ticketing solutions, ecommerce and artist management.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
 
CMU Jobs is a proven way to recruit the best music business talent for roles across the industry at all levels, from graduate to senior management. To book an ad contact Sam on 020 7099 9060 or email ads@unlimitedmedia.co.uk
 

The Pirate Bay returns to Swedish domain name
Having tried on a few various domain names for size in countries all around the world over the course of this year (and mostly the last week and a half), The Pirate Bay has returned to its Swedish web address. Well, it's always nice to put on a familiar jumper at Christmas.

As much previously reported, having switched to it from a .org domain in 2012 after the US authorities seized MegaUpload's also American-registered .com address, The Pirate Bay then abandoned its .se domain in favour of a Greenland-registered URL in April this year, in anticipation of its Swedish domain being seized by the authorities there.

However, a few days later the company that oversees Greenland's domain registration said that it would block the new URL, due to the country's affiliation to Denmark where the file-sharing service is deemed illegal, leaving TPB to sail over to Iceland to try a new domain there.

The site was again on the move mere days later, after an injunction against the .se domain went into effect in Sweden - with Swedish lawyers arguing that as the Icelandic domain was registered in the name of TPB co-founder Fredrik Neij, who is a Swedish national, the injunction counted against that URL too. Which takes us up to the beginning of May, and a slightly longer stint registered on the Caribbean island of Sint Maarten, which lasted until last week.

Since then, it's been all action, with a move from Sint Maarten to Ascension Island in the South Atlantic, followed by Peru, then on Wednesday Guyana, the latter domain briefly forwarding back to the .se domain name before being taken offline yesterday. The original .org address is also now functioning, forwarding onto thepiratebay.se.

Although the move back to the Swedish domain raises more questions than any of the other domain shifts this year, The Pirate Bay has been unusually quiet about it, not even announcing that it was using the Swedish address as it's primary URL again.

Earlier this week a spokesperson for The Pirate Bay told TorrentFreak that the site would continue to shift to new domains (reckoning there were 70 more possibilities) until it "find one that sticks".

It seems unlikely that the Swedish domain will be the one that fits that bill, given legal moves against it began earlier this year and the famous 2009 court battle the Bay lost in the country confirmed the file-sharing operation breaks Swedish copyright laws, but we shall see how long it manages to hold out back on its home territory.

Belfast courts hand down suspended sentences to file-sharing site operators
Two men have received suspended sentences in the Belfast Crown Court for their involvement in running a file-sharing operation called Araditracker, which was mainly known for providing unlicensed access to movies and software. The case confirms that, under UK law, there can be a criminal element to the operation of a profit-generating online platform that enables others to infringe copyright.

Hugh Reid and Marcus Lewis, a father and son-in-law now based in Belfast and Suffolk respectively, took donations for about a year from people who used Araditracker to access free music, movie and software files. In late 2007 the film industry's Federation Against Copyright Theft took action, forcing Araditracker offline, though Reid and Lewis quickly set up an alternative service.

That led to Reid's Belfast home being raided in August 2008, and a second raid of Lewis's home, then in North Wales, three months later. Prosecutors said that they secured a range of evidence to prove the two men's involvement in the file-sharing operation, which Reid seemingly first set up when his radiator business hit the hard times in 2006.

The two men pleaded guilty to the infringement crimes, which the judge hearing the case described as "nothing less than theft", adding to the two men "you must have known from an early stage that this was criminal behaviour".

According to Belfast Daily, the judge added: "There are people who work here locally making films, both in this jurisdiction and elsewhere, as well as the people who work in cinemas and in DVD distribution. These are the people who are all affected by your copyright infringements".

A confiscation hearing will now take place, with prosecutors seeking to recover £33,000 from Reid. His defence team said their client "had the means" to settle that matter.

The Belfast ruling follows a judgement in the Swedish courts earlier this week, where a former moderator of file-sharing site Swebits received a suspended sentence and was fined a massive $652,000 for sharing over 500 movies and TV shows on the site.

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Katherine Jackson disputes legal costs claimed by AEG
Michael Jackson's mother Katherine is involved in a new legal squabble with AEG Live after losing her court battle with the live giant earlier this year, in which the Jackson family matriarch wanted the concert promoter held liable for the death of her son, as the employer of the doctor convicted for causing his demise in 2009 through negligent treatment.

While Mrs Jackson got about appealing the ruling, AEG passed its legal bills onto the court, requesting that the Jacksons cover them as the unsuccessful party in the case. And those bills top $1.2 million.

According to TMZ, legal reps for the Jacksons are now dissecting those charges, and are questioning the costs cited by AEG for process servers, creating court exhibits for use in the trial, and for covering the costs of witnesses whose depositions were, the Jacksons claim, unnecessary.

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Weird Al Yankovic settles lawsuit with Sony Music
Weird Al Yankovic has settled the lawsuit he launched against Sony Music last year, in which he claimed, amongst other things, that he was due a higher cut of digital revenues on his music than the major was currently paying.

As much previously reported, various artists with pre-iTunes contracts have gone legal over their cut of digital royalties, after FBT Productions won a case against Universal Music relating to early Eminem recordings. The production outfit successfully argued that if a contract doesn't explicitly say how digital royalties are divided up, they should be treated as licensing revenue, rather than sales income, the former usually paying out a higher percentage to the artist.

Shortly before Yankovic launched his lawsuit, Sony Music offered a settlement deal to all affected artists, as the result of earlier digital royalties litigation launched by The Allman Brothers and Cheap Trick back in 2006 (though it was still to get court approval). That Yankovic went legal anyway suggests that he didn't think much of the offer of a 3% increase in download revenue.

It's not clear what deal Yankovic has now received - though he was originally asking for $5 million in damages.

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Beatles release confirms intricacies of copyright extension
The release of a bunch of Beatles rarities on iTunes earlier this week has confirmed some specifics about the much previously reported copyright term extension for sound recordings.

It emerged that a new collection of 59 Beatles recordings was about to be released last week, including demos, outtakes and BBC sessions. The digital compilation has been released as part of the exclusivity deal between the Fab Four's company Apple Corps and record label (now Universal Music) and the other Apple and its iTunes store.

So, a nice treat for Beatles fans, though with all the tracks, previously unreleased, coming from 1963 it quickly became clear something else was going on here too.

As much previously reported, until recently the copyright term for sound recordings was 50 years, meaning records released in 1963 would become public domain in Europe next month. But, after much lobbying from the record industry, the term was extended to 70 years, meaning The Beatles catalogue ('Love Me Do' aside) now has an extra 20 years of copyright protection.

However, there's a catch. The copyright term in the sound recording is linked to the date the recording was made, or the date the recording was released. Normally those dates are pretty close to each other so that the distinction isn't so important. But what it means is that labels sitting on unreleased recordings that are nearing the end of their copyright term can, in essence, reboot the copyright by releasing the record (or even just giving it a public performance). Though that late-in-the-day release must occur before the copyright term based on recording date ends.

Or even sooner, as it turns out. Because the deadline for releasing unreleased recordings to reset the copyright term has stayed at 50 years, because the copyright in unreleased master recordings will still expire after five decades (in that such recordings are not included in the European Directive that extended the term). Hence Universal and Apple Corps needed to give the 1963 bootlegs an official release now, rather than in 20 years time, to ensure copyright term reboot, and to stop the recordings from going public domain.

Earlier this year Sony did something similar with some Bob Dylan archive recordings, and you can expect all the major labels to be releasing collections of previously unheard records from their most bankable artists in the coming years as the 50 year deadlines expire.

As also previously reported, the copyright extension, which came into effect on 1 Nov, also includes a use-it-or-lose-it element which enables any musician involved in a recording which a label is not currently distributing - including session musicians and producers - to force the record company to put out a physical and digital version of the track or album, or risk losing their economic rights over the copyright work.

The use-it-or-lose-it element was included because politicians were persuaded of the need for copyright extension based on the benefits to performers rather than labels, and performers only get those benefits if a label ensures a recording is in circulation. However, it turns out that the use-it-or-lose-it clause is not relevant to The Beatles release, which is why Universal and Apple only need to put out a cheap and cheerful digital album, and not a full-blown CD box set.

William Morris Endeavour acquires IMG
Talent agency William Morris Endeavour earlier this week confirmed it was acquiring one of its major competitors in a $2.3 billion deal backed by private equity group Silver Lake.

The combination of WME and IMG Worldwide will create a talent management and partnership powerhouse, with particular significance in the sports domain where IMG was strongest. Though it will also further extend WME's reach into the live music space too, with IMG working with both Taylor Swift and Justin Timberlake.

Confirming the deal, WME bosses Patrick Whitesell and Ariel Emanuel said in a statement: "IMG has incredible strategic value to WME. Supported by Silver Lake's continued partnership, WME and IMG together will deliver a broad range of opportunities and resources to the companies and talent we collectively represent".

Investigation underway after West End theatre ceiling collapses on audience
It may have occurred at Theatreland's Apollo Theatre (as opposed to the other Apollo venue over in Hammersmith that's better known for music and comedy), but the live sector at large is likely to watch with interest as investigators work out how a ceiling could collapse at a West End theatre injuring 76 people, seven seriously.

The incident occurred during an almost sell-out performance of the National Theatre's show 'The Curious Incident Of The Dog In The Night-Time'. Audience members report of hearing a cracking noise and seeing dripping water before a large section of ornate plasterwork fell from the roof, with debris seemingly landing on all levels of the 775 capacity venue.

Emergency services were called as a panicked audience evacuated the building at about 8.15pm last night. According to reports, 76 people suffered injuries with 58 being taken to hospital, and seven incurring serious though not life threatening injuries. It's still not clear what caused the ceiling collapse.

Speaking to the BBC, Deputy Assistant Commissioner of the London Fire Brigade, Graham Ellis, said last night: "We've manage to stabilise the situation inside the theatre, we're working closely with colleagues at Westminster City Council, their building surveyors. The scene has now been sterilized, nobody is going in there and investigations have started".

While the impact of the ceiling collapse could have been much worse, in that there were no fatalities, questions are now likely to be asked as to how the incident was able to occur, and whether there were any failings in the management and regulation of the building. And while incidents such as this at the capital's entertainment venues are very rare, all eyes will be on the venue's owners and the local authority's licensing unit for reassurances about the safety elsewhere.

Although Apollo operator Nimax Theatres is yet to make any comment on its social media channels, a spokesman for the company last night called the incident
"shocking and upsetting" adding that an investigation was under way and that "our thoughts are with the audience and staff".

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Council approves Finsbury Park for Live Nation's Wireless, though not all locals happy
The London edition of Live Nation's Wireless festival is almost certainly moving to Finsbury Park after Haringey Borough Council approved a licensing application earlier this week, though the live giant may have to deal with some unhappy neighbours, something which previously hindered its summer festivals operation in Hyde Park.

Wireless was one of the flagship events Live Nation created in 2005 once it secured the rights to stage concerts in Hyde Park. But in more recent years complaints by residents living near the park led to limitations on sound levels and curfews, and ultimately the partnership between the live firm and the Royal Parks ended after the 2012 season. The latter then struck up a new deal with Live Nation rival AEG Live, which staged a streamlined and reworked live event programme in the park earlier this year, seemingly without pissing off the locals so much.

But while AEG was busy telling the world that it could succeed where its rival failed by using Hyde Park as a festival venue while keeping both punters and locals happy, Live Nation scored a coup by announcing it had the rights to stage music events in the Olympic Park in East London, and that's where Wireless took place in 2013, with a headline-grabbing bill led by Live Nation business partner Jay-Z.

But, insiders say, while the Olympic Park was a good venue in publicity terms, there were issues with using the space for a music festival which have not yet been resolved, which is why Live Nation decided to look for another London space for its summer city centre festivals programme. Resulting in the shift to Finsbury Park.

The North London park has been host to numerous concerts and festivals over the years, so locals there should be used to it, though some critics of the licence Live Nation has secured say that Wireless is significantly bigger than any event previously hosted at the site, and will result in more inconvenience for locals, and more of the park being cut off from the public.

Local Liberal Democrat Councillor Katherine Reece told the Haringey Independent: "[We] believe that far greater co-ordination with police and transport authorities needs to take place for larger concerts in the park, and that the Labour-run council has not provided assurances that enough will be done to lessen the impact on residents. And Live Nation's indefinite license for concerts in Finsbury Park means that far larger parts of the park will be unavailable to residents for longer periods than ever before".

But local Council Leader Claire Kober defended the decision to grant the license, telling the local paper: "We're proud that Finsbury Park is home to such a rich programme of events that brings visitors to our borough and supports local traders. This policy will not increase the number of large events, but it will bring in vital income to help us maintain our Green Flag award-winning parks at a time when our budget is being significantly reduced. We're committed to better licensing and enforcement to minimise disruption from events to local residents - as well as funding free community events and festivals that continue to make use of Finsbury Park's stunning facilities".

As previously reported, earlier this week Live Nation announced that Wireless would take place from 4-6 Jul in 2014, with a second edition for the first time since 2007, this time taking place in Birmingham.

Matt Willis to join Eastenders
McPopstar-by-day, actor-by-night, showbiz all-rounder Matt Willis has taken on another TV role (aside from his part in ITV's 'Bird Of A Feather' revival, that is), this time in 'EastEnders'. Although married to Emma Willis in real life, Matt will pretend to be Stacey Branning's naïve new squeeze on the telly soap, ambitious city boy Luke, because he really is that great at acting.

Theatre school grad Matt says: "I am so thrilled to be a part of such an iconic show. I grew up watching 'EastEnders' so this is really exciting for me!"

Willis will apparently, thinks the Mirror, make his first Albert Square appearance in the new year, perhaps even January. He can't stay for long, mind, if he's to honour all those McBusted tour dates he possibly wishes he hadn't agreed to.

CMU Insights evening course provides complete overview of the music business in 2014
The first CMU Insights course for 2014 has just been announced, offering a chance for music business professionals to get a complete overview of their sector, with a focus on revenue streams and music rights; how artists can build, analyse and monetise a fanbase; and the deals they need to do to capitalise on all the opportunities.

CMU Business Editor Chris Cooke, who leads the course, says: "Challenges remain, but there is plenty to be optimistic about as the music business moves into 2014, as we learn to put the artist at the centre of what we do, and better capitalise on all elements of each act's fan relationship. This course provides an overview of the various revenue streams that exist in music, and then considers how artists should build and analyse their fanbase, and build a business to make it all happen".

The Music Business In 2014 is a great course for anyone working in music, whether looking for a beginner's guide, or an overview of latest trends and new approaches. It's an eight part evening course, consisting of eight two-hour sessions every week from Monday 20 January, taking place in Shoreditch, East London.

Places are just £299, including VAT and booking fee, and can be secured here.

  CMU Artists Of The Year 2013: Janelle Monáe
Each weekday in the run up to the Christmas break, we've been revealing our ten favourite artists of the year. To see the full list, check this page. Our final artist is Janelle Monáe...

As well as being the last to feature in this year's Artists Of The Year rundown, Janelle Monáe is also the first returning artist we've ever had in our customary end-of-calendar best artists review, having previously made the list in 2010, the year she released her debut album 'The ArchAndroid'.

This year she was back again, with a second long playing record (third if you count her debut mini-album 'Metropolis') loosely themed on the plight of her android alter ego from the future, Cindi Mayweather, who faces disassembly for falling in love with a human, goes on the run and becomes a figurehead (possibly even messiah) for the android community. At nineteen tracks long (three of them story-furthering interludes), 'The Electric Lady' is quite a journey.

Of course, like all the best science fiction, Monáe's music is not really about robots from the future, its commentary very much based in the human present. The story is a centre point to hang other ideas from, which you can choose to engage with as much or as little as you want. Part of Monáe's genius is to present music that you can take as a fictional narrative, commentary on issues such as feminism, civil rights, poverty and homophobia, or just a collection of great love songs. If you just want to have fun, she won't stop you, because at her heart she is a diehard entertainer.

I don't want to fall into the trap of pitting female musicians against each other, but I think there are a few clear parallels to be drawn between how Janelle Monáe and Lady Gaga present themselves. Both hold tight reigns on their images, with a certain amount of self-mythologising, and both have created organisations in which to work - the Wondaland Arts Society and the Haus Of Gaga respectively.

Both also make bold claims about what they want to achieve with their music, and it's here that Monáe really pulls ahead - the music she makes is the music she describes beforehand, whereas Gaga talks a good talk but fails to back it up with anything of real substance. The difference, perhaps, is that Gaga lives for the applause, while Monáe wants to give em what they love.

It's a subtle, but important distinction, and it comes back down to Monáe's role as an entertainer first, artist second. If the art doesn't entertain, then it's not for her. And on 'The Electric Lady' she entertains more successfully than ever before. Nineteen tracks the album may have, but none of that is filler. It's a collection of well-crafted songs matched with perfect production that easily earn regular repeat plays.

Musically, she hasn't strayed from the R&B sound of 'The ArchAndroid', but her second LP holds together more consistently across the course of the whole album. And it sounds timeless. This isn't a record you'll be able to immediately place in 2013 in five or ten year's time, but nor does it sound like pastiche.

I haven't yet had the chance to see her perform these songs live in person, but TV and YouTube show me that she's the same infectious ball of energy she was when touring 'The ArchAndroid'. Also, it looks like she might be getting closer to creating the stage show she didn't quite have the budget for three years ago.

And best of all, as great as everything she's done this year has been, it still feels like she has more to give. The marker that has appeared on the covers of her previous two releases shows that there are still two suites to come in the Cindi Mayweather story, and Monáe has talked of films, stage productions and graphic novels in the past too. All of which I'll happy believe she could pull off with flair.

It's testament of the quality of 'The Electric Lady' that I can come this far in my write-up before mentioning the impressive array of guests on it, including Prince, Solange, Erykah Badu and Esperanza Spalding. But to close, I'll leave you with the collaboration that's stood out the most for me, and my personal favourite track on the album, 'Primetime' with Miguel - a song where the rhythm laps underneath you as you lie back into it. Watch the video for the song now.
 
   
Vigsy's Festive Picks: Christmas and New Year club tips
With Christmas coming up next week, you'll have a few days to relax with family and to recover from the strains of the Christmas party season. But with the biggest party night of the year fast approaching, you'll need to get back on the horse as soon as you can. So, to get you limbered up, I've selected a couple of nights worth checking out during the festive break, as well as my picks of the New Year's Eve parties on offer.

Boxing Day: Back To 95's Boxing Day Back To Back Special at Club Coliseum
Back To 95's Boxing Day Back To Back Special is back, with six DJ duos head to head (or back to back, I suppose). The line-up features original Dreem Teem legends DJ Spoony and Mikee B; Scott Garcia b2b and Ray Hurley; Pied Piper and Mike 'Ruff Cut' Lloyd; Hermit and Daniel Ward; Jason Kaye and Listener; plus Chris Lavish and Jerry Rankin. They'll all be flanked by a solid line-up of the scene's best-loved MC's, to transport you back to the old skool at Club Coliseum in Vauxhall.

Thursday 26 Dec, Club Coliseum, 1 Nine Elms Lane, London SW8 5NQ, 10pm-5am, more info here.

28 Jan: 2manydjs at Sankeys
Filling that weird gap between Christmas and New Year, 2manydjs will be hitting up Manchester's premier dance venue, the newly reopened Sankeys. They'll be joined by The Freestylers and other still-to-be-confirmed guests.

Saturday 28 Jan, Sankeys, Radium Street, Manchester, M4 6AY, 10pm-5am, £17.50, more info here.

New Year's Eve: Bruk Out at Big Chill House
The Bruk Out crew usher in 2014 at The Big Chill House with the help of two of UK garage's big hitters, Zed Bias and Wookie. The House will be transformed into a tropical playground, as beat obsessives Jus Now and a ten-piece Brazilian drum troupe also feature on the line-up alongside Bruk Out residents Nasty McQuaid and Mangno.

Tuesday 31 Dec, Big Chill House, 257-259 Pentonville Road, London, N1 9BL, 9pm - 5am, £20, more info here.

New Year's Eve: Heavy Disco Meets Eat The Beat at The Star Of Kings
Heavy Disco Meets Eat The Beat will offer an intimate house party vibe at The Star Of Kings in King Cross. If you are into real house and disco, lap it up on two floors at this mid-size venue. Some real musical connoisseurs are on board, including West London's original Ballistic Brother Ashley Beedle, plus Balearic Mike and Sean Johnston from ALFOS.

Tuesday 31 Dec, The Star Of Kings, 126 York Way, London, N1 0AX, 9pm-5am, £20, more info here.

New Year's Eve: NYE House Party at The Social
The Social's NYE event will be hosted by The Ragga Twins, who will create a house party vibe at this rather good venue just off Oxford Street. They'll be joined by Rob Pursey of the Hip Hop Karaoke club nights and the Heavenly Jukebox DJs, Found A Cure and Mr Midnight.

Tuesday 31 Dec, The Social, 5 Little Portland Street, London, W1W 7JD, 9pm-5am, £10-£15, more info here.

New Year's Eve: Holic at Café 1001
US Detroit techno visionary Dan Curtin and Berlin's Panorama Bar resident Oliver Deutschmann land feet first on Brick Lane for Holic's NYE bash, with Tomoki Tamura and many others. And if you're looking for more party for your pound, this one goes on until 10am on News Year's Day.

Tuesday 31 Dec, Café 1001, 91 Brick Lane, London, E1 6QL, 8pm-10am, £20, more info here.

New year's Eve: Jamais Vu Party at a secret Shoreditch location
Stuck looking for a bit of drum n bass? Then look no further than the Jamais Vu NYE party, with Fabio, Bailey, Randall and Jumping Jack Frost. It's a great line-up, all going down at an as-yet-to-be-revealed East London location.

Tuesday 31 Dec, secret location in Shoreditch, 9pm-6am, £20, more info here.
 

Adele gets MBE
The British Empire has deemed Adele Adkins a member of its 'Most Excellent Order', which means she's been handed an MBE for her services to pop and the 'James Bond' franchise.

Adele was named an MBE amidst the Queen's Birthday Honours list earlier this year, as was PJ Harvey and a customary list of other music types, and went to Buckingham Palace to get it via Prince Charles yesterday.

And here she is, finding it all very silly.

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Dev Hynes rethinks donations drive following NYC fire
Dev Hynes, aka alt-pop artist Blood Orange, has broken his not very long silence on the fire that destroyed "everything" he owns earlier this week. As previously reported, an online donations drive was launched in Hynes' name following the blaze - which totalled his New York apartment, taking with it his dog Cupid.

In a blog post, Hynes has said that - on reflection - he's decided to give some or all (he isn't certain yet) of the cash raised by the crowd sourcing campaign set up by the mother of his girlfriend, Friends' Samantha Urbani, to three charities he'll reveal at a later date.

He writes: "This happens to so many people, people that don't have a girlfriend's place they can stay at. People who don't have a job they can do to try and help themselves money wise to attempt to get back on their feet. This is in my mind every second. I truly have lost everything I own, hard to wrap your head around, but I have".

He adds: "If I am honest, the fundraiser makes me feel extremely uncomfortable. This isn't me saying I don't need the money, to reiterate, I have lost everything. But maybe it's time I down some anxiety medication, see a doctor and try and play some shows y'know? There are things I can do, although it will take years, that can help myself rebuild, a huge part of me is still struggling with understanding the events of two nights ago, and where to take my life from here".

The still-active gofundme.com campaign has so fair raised over $24,000, almost five-times its original goal of $5,000. Something which irked Vagenda co-founder Holly Baxter, who used the campaign as a launchpad to criticise crowdfunding in general on The Guardian's Comment Is Free site - an article published shortly after Hynes announced that he would likely give the money away.

Originally bearing the headline 'Dev Hynes's puppy sob story has left me burnt out' (later changed to the less reactionary 'Why celebrity crowdfunding has little appeal'), Hynes posted a link to the piece on his Facebook page, commenting: "This is disgusting. I'm so hurt. I want to go on the record and say I will never talk to The Guardian ever again, I want nothing I ever make to be on their website, or in their magazine. Please pull the interview I did recently. I don't want it to come out".

Baxter later responded on the Vagenda Twitter account to criticism she had received there, saying: "Guys. That was a tongue-in-cheek article about crowdfunding. While I welcome criticism, please stop threatening to 'shank' me. My article was intended as a discussion about crowdfunding in general, and included a paragraph on Dev Hynes. Offence not intended, so sorry".

So there you go. Though, while Baxter probably wasn't responsible for that rather insensitive headline, or the big picture of Hynes at the top of her article, she did actually write three paragraphs about him. And if she really didn't intend to offend anyone, maybe rather than piggybacking off someone's house burning down, she should have published her article back when debating the pros and cons of crowdfunding was still 'a thing'.

Jamie xx, Sampha preview new tracks
So, the team at XL Recordings division Young Turks took over Benji B's BBC Radio 1 slot for a two-hour show on Wednesday night, as part of the station's sporadic Label Focus series.

The programme featured live Maida Vale sets by Koreless - who bought a string quintet with him - and Spanish John Talabot collaborator Pional. Most exclusively, though, DJ-to-The-xx Jamie (xx) played a new, recently-leaked track titled 'Sleep Sound', which he confirmed on the show will be on his first solo LP, which will be released - and this is an extra revelation - in 2014. Drake's new bezzie Sampha also played a song no one had previously heard, and its name was 'Courtesy'.

Listen to the entire Young Turks special, which also features interviews with label head Caius Parson, and Romy xx, who speaks softly for a bit about the band's present activities, here.

Danny Brown announces UK shows
US rapper Danny Brown has announced that he'll be back in the UK in February, for another promotional push on his 'Old' album. He'll also be back once more to play London's Field Day festival in June.

Check out the dates here:

21 Feb: London, Koko
22 Feb: Brighton, Coalition
23 Feb: Manchester, Gorilla
25 Feb: Dublin, Academy
26 Feb: Glasgow, The Arches

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Festival line-up update: Glastonbury, Liverpool Psych Fest, Fresh Island, Off The Tracks
Stand by... this is big, if not exactly a shock. Arcade Fire have confirmed themselves, having made outrageous hints only last month, as the first headlining act at 2014's Glastonbury fest. Tweeting the news in this pic, the band revealed they'll play a Pyramid Stage set on 27 Jun, news which was later double confirmed on the Glastonbury website (just in case you thought they were lying).

With that, it's on to Liverpool's International Festival Of Psychedelia, or Liverpool Psych Fest, which will in 2014 feature as its main attraction Swedish herd Goat, and additional artists like Lay Llamas, Teeth Of The Sea, Anthroprophh, Gnod, The Janitors, Zombie Zombie, Les Big Byrd and Vaadat Charigim.

And with that, it's on to a variety of additions in the following mixed festival bag...

DERBY FOLK FESTIVAL, Assembly Rooms, Derby, 3-5 Oct 2014: Kate Rusby, Show Of Hands, Coope, Boyes & Simpson, Folk 3D Showcase, Lester Simpson, Merry Hell, Winter:Wilson. derbyfolkfestival.co.uk

FRESH ISLAND FESTIVAL, Zrce Beach, Pag, Croatia, 23-25 Jul 2014: Method Man, Redman. www.fresh-island.org

HEBCELT, Stornoway, Isle Of Lewis, Scotland, 16-19 Jul 2014: Donnie Munro, Gordie MacKeeman And His Rhythm Boys, Willie Campbell And The Open Day Rotation. www.hebceltfest.com

GLASTONBURY, Worthy Farm, Somerset, 25-29 Jun 2014: Arcade Fire. www.glastonburyfestivals.co.uk

LIVERPOOL PSYCH FEST, Camp & Furnace, Liverpool, 26-27 Sep 2014: Goat, Hills, Lay Llamas, Teeth Of The Sea, Anthroprophh, Gnod, The Janitors, Zombie Zombie, Les Big Byrd, Vaadat Charigim, Dark Bells, Sudden Death Of Stars, In Zaire, One Unique Signal, Cantaloupe. www.liverpoolpsychfest.com

OFF THE TRACKS, Donington Park Farmhouse Hotel, Derbyshire, 23-25 May 2013: Big Country, Moulettes, Eat Static, Plantec. www.offthetracks.co.uk

CMU Beef Of The Week #187: The year in beefs
It's the week before Christmas and everyone's in a good mood, so there are no beefs to be had. No, let me stop you there, there are absolutely none. Not even one. So, instead of dissecting a single event from the last seven days this week, we're going to look back at some of our favourite beefs of 2013. And they're all top quality prime beefs too, there's no horse meat here.

January: Bunny Wailer v Snoop Dogg
Hey, remember when Snoop Dogg stopped being Snoop Dogg, like, forever, and instead we were all supposed to call him Snoop Lion? All because he was a Rastafarian and 'reggae star' now. Well he did do all that, much to the annoyance of Rastafarians everywhere, particularly the religion's official representatives, including Bunny Wailer, who said that Snoop had failed to meet "contractual, moral and verbal commitments" to them, adding talk of legal action. Meanwhile this month reggae expert Roger Steffens said that it "would be a travesty if Snoop wins" the Best Reggae Album Grammy he's nominated for. So that went well.

February: Ex-HMV staff v HMV management
We all know now that HMV has been saved and will never ever be forced to close down (never, right?), but back in February things were not so clear. With administrator Deloitte still trying to secure a buyer for the music retailer, it one day decided to cut 190 jobs at the company's HQ in one go. And in a perfect demonstration of how managers at big companies often don't understand social media, or why they even should, the person in charge of HMV's Twitter account (whose job the Marketing Director was apparently not even aware of) live-tweeted the whole thing.

March: Morrissey v Bowie
Until March 2013, everyone thought that the finest example of 'Rickrolling' of all time was Rick Astley being voted Best Act Ever at the 2008 MTV Europe Music Awards. We all also thought that 'Rockrolling' was an exhausted meme best left in the past. But then David Bowie refused to allow a picture of himself and Morrissey to appear on the artwork of a re-issue of Moz's 'The Last Of The Famous International Playboys'. Rather than fight, the photo was replaced with a photo of the former Smiths frontman and Mr Astley. Oh, we laughed.

April: Busta Rhymes v Cheeseburger Baby
Quick quiz: If you are Busta Rhymes, do you have to queue up to purchase food in fast food restaurants? If you answered no, I'm afraid you have not won a prize. If you answered yes, you've also not won a prize, but you were at least correct. Busta got it wrong too when he visited Cheeseburger Baby in Miami back in April. Silly Busta.

May: The Jacksons v AEG Live
Granted, this was a story that stretched out far outside May of this year (and if that annoys you, please skip straight to our other favourite beef of that month), but back then the Jackson family's lawsuit against AEG Live was just grinding into court-side action. And grinding was the word, when amongst the petty points debated during the first week was the defence's initial refusal to concede that Michael Jackson was actually dead.

June: Tom Odell's dad v The NME
Tom Odell was the winner of the 2013 BRITs Critics' Choice Award. Which means he was the year's top choice of all UK critics. So what the NME was doing publishing a review saying that his album wasn't very good, I don't know. And neither did Tom's dad, who rang the magazine to complain, which was definitely not embarrassing.

July: Wiley v CockRock
Everything that Wiley does has some intrinsic entertainment value. I bet just seeing him brush his teeth would raise a little chuckle. Oh, I'm imagining it now. It's quite amusing. Though I am confused as to why Wiley is in my bathroom and using my toothbrush. Anyway, his headline set at this year's CockRock festival entertained far more than the few thousand people who witnessed it - all fifteen minutes of it - before he walked off, claiming he had been endangered by the crowd. When pressured to either give back his £15,000 fee, or at least donate it to charity, he announced that he was going to "piss this 15k up the wall".

August: Fans on the rampage
August was a month of pop fans waging war online. First it was (as usual) One Direction fans, who took against the series of covers GQ had designed to go with an interview with the boyband. Rather than just not buying the magazine, they instead started sending death threats to its publishers and one used the word 'cupcake' in anger. After that, fighting broke out between Katy Perry and Lady Gaga fans, after it emerged that the former was planning to release a single in the same week as the later - clearly an act of war, and one that no amount of peacekeeping attempts from the artists themselves could stop. Out in the real world, Brandy was shunning her fans. Well, the 40 who turned up to see her in a 90,000 capacity stadium in South Africa, anyway.

September: Bromley Beekeepers Association v Bez
Bez has started keeping bees, and he thinks other people should do so too. He even got involved in a campaign to set up rooftop hives in Manchester. Admirable, no? No. Not according to the Bromley Beekeepers association, who wrote to The Guardian to complain that Bez was encouraging people to pick up the hobby without enough thought. Though an anecdote about 100 bees getting into Bez's pants was as much thought as I needed (to shun the idea for life).

October: Arashi fans v Arashi trees
In another tale of fans gone wild, devotees of Japanese boyband Arashi began travelling in droves to the island of Hokkaido to visit a group of trees that the band had touched in an advert. The locals were not best pleased, but it seemed impossible to stop the fans arriving, making a mess of the place and cutting pieces off the trees. Until the owner of the land they stood on came up with an ingenious (possibly not ingenious) plan.

November: Lily Allen and James Arthur
November was a busy month for popstars rubbing the public up the wrong way. First Lily Allen released a new video, that was widely praised and widely derided. No, not that bloody advert, the video for 'Hard Out Here', which some suggested might be a bit racist. But if there was some ambiguity in that debate, there seemed to be little in the one revolving around homophobic lyrics written by James Arthur. Unless you were James Arthur of course, in which case you'd think it reasonable to argue that calling someone a "fucking queer" wasn't homophobic.

December: (Definitely) BBC Radio Lancashire v (Probably not) Radio Caroline
December has been a little quiet on the beef front (what with people getting into the Christmas spirit and all), but what it lacked in venom it made up for in confusion. In perhaps the year's most perplexing BOTW, a man who had been interviewed on BBC Radio Lancashire about his time as a presenter on Radio Caroline in the 60s was thoroughly cross examined by BBC Local Radio's political correspondent Paul Rowley and accused of lying about his former job. His inability to answer even the most simple questions about Radio Caroline suggested that Rowley was right, which made for one of the year's most unusual pieces of radio.

 
ANDY MALT | Editor
Andy heads up the team, overseeing the CMU bulletin and website, coordinating features and interviews, reporting on artist and business stories, and contributing to the CMU Approved column.
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ALY BARCHI | Staff Writer
Aly reports on artist news, coordinates the festival, gig and release round up columns, and contributes to the CMU Approved column. She also writes for CMU's sister title ThisWeek London.
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Caro helps oversee the CMU media, while as a Director of UnLimited Media she heads up the company's other two titles ThisWeek London and ThreeWeeks Edinburgh, and supports other parts of the business.
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