An UnLimited Media Bulletin
Thursday 15 May 2014

 
TODAY'S TOP STORY: Over 3000 former Warner Music interns in the US will receive a letter informing them about a class action lawsuit being pursued against the major over its internship practices. While in the UK the Inland Revenue has been cracking down on the use of unpaid interns in the music industry (except where work placements fulfil exemptions to minimum wage rules), in the US various former interns... [READ MORE]
 
TODAY'S APPROVED: Andy Carthy, aka Mr Scruff, is back with his new album 'Friendly Bacteria' next week, his first studio album since 2008's 'Ninja Tuna', and in Carthy's own words it's "tougher, sparser, less samples, more bass [with] more vocals and collaborations and shorter tunes". This low end funk guru has certainly not lost his sheen, as is clear as soon as the opening tune 'Stereo Breath' hits you with its heavy beats... [READ MORE]
TOP STORIES Letter to be sent to 3000 former Warner interns in ongoing lawsuit
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DEALS Chainsmokers sign Sony/ATV publishing deal
JUMP | ONLINE
LABELS & PUBLISHERS Sony Corp confirms losses, with more to come
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LIVE BUSINESS MPs warn new government guidance on secondary ticketing doesn't go far enough
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MANAGEMENT & FUNDING Alan McGee launches Creation Management, signs The Jesus & Mary Chain
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DIGITAL & D2F SERVICES Major labels take minority stakes in Shazam
Musicians protest loss of net neutrality
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MEDIA RAJAR Round-Up: Evans up, Grimmy down, digital growing
Simon Cowell launches South American telly talent show
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THE GREAT ESCAPE Pop misogyny debate turns to music videos, empowerment and porn at The Great Escape
Ignore email at your peril, says fan engagement panel at The Great Escape
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INDUSTRY PEOPLE Music Business School and London School Of Sound announce alliance
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RELEASES Release Round-Up: Nero, Sia, East India Youth, Stone's Throw, The Dø and Len
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AND FINALLY... Musical rich lists published
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Click JUMP to skip direct to a section of this email or ONLINE to read and share stories on the CMU website (JUMP option may not work in all email readers). For regular updates from Team CMU follow us on Twitter, Facebook or Tumblr.
 
 
AUDIO - PROMOTIONS MANAGER
Brighton's number one music venue Audio and Above Audio is recruiting a Promotions Manager. Regarded as one of the best small clubs in the UK, Audio regularly hosts some of the worlds best DJ's and is also a well established live music venue. Above Audio, one of Brighton's premier cocktail bars, boasts the largest back bar, and is home to some of the finest mixologists in the city.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
[PIAS] ARTIST & LABEL SERVICES - INTERNATIONAL DIGITAL SALES MANAGER
[PIAS] A&L Services have a vacancy within the A&L National Accounts Team as International Digital Sales Manager. The role has responsibility for maximising digital revenues outside of the core [PIAS] territories as well as coordinating activity and campaigns on a pan-territory basis.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
ALPHA MUSIC PUBLISHING UK LTD - ROYALTY AND ADMINISTRATION MANAGER
We are a small but very established French music publisher looking for a French-speaking Royalty And Administration Manager for our London office.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
 
   
DHP FAMILY - DIGITAL MARKETING MANAGER
Based in Nottingham, we are looking for a creative individual who has a love for the opportunities that digital media presents. Primarily working on concerts and festivals, you will be responsible for our social media channels, e-mailouts, websites and online advertisements. We expect you to be able to deliver reach, growth and engagement with our online community, and be able to lead the development of our online marketing strategy going forward.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
TICKETMASTER - CLIENT SERVICES MANAGER - MUSIC
Reporting to the Head of Client Account Management, the Client Services Manager – Music, will be responsible for the management of all aspects of Ticketmaster’s client relationships (Music) whilst working closely with Directorial and Regional ‘stakeholders’ in the development, and execution, of current and future business strategies.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
ACADEMY MUSIC GROUP - WEBSITE PRODUCTION COORDINATOR
Responsible as part of the digital team for the front-end maintenance of the website and email templates, producing HTML/CSS web pages and graphics to reflect key promotional activities and online communications.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
DOMINO - PARALEGAL / BUSINESS AFFAIRS ASSISTANT
Domino seeks a Paralegal / Business Affairs Assistant to join record label and publishing company assisting the Business Affairs department. Reporting to the Business Affairs Manager and Company Directors, the role will provide every opportunity for the successful candidate to develop their commercial and legal skills in the music industry.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
SOUND ADVICE - MUSIC LAWYER
Sound Advice is a London based law firm specialising in the music industry, focusing mainly on the representation of artists and managers. We have a client roster to be proud of, from home and abroad. We are looking for an experienced lawyer to join us.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
FUGA - SALES & BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT REPRESENTATIVE
FUGA are looking to expand our London-based team with a Sales & Business Development Representative to develop the market, drive revenue and manage client relations in the UK.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
AEI MEDIA - ROYALTIES ASSISTANT
AEI Media Ltd are seeking an experienced and passionate Royalties Administrator to join their team; the role will sit within a dynamic accounting function and report directly into the Finance Manager.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
AEI MEDIA - FINANCE ASSISTANT
AEI Media Ltd are seeking an articulate and ambitious Finance Assistant; the role will sit within a dynamic accounting function and report directly into the Finance Manager.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
 
CMU Jobs is a proven way to recruit the best music business talent for roles across the industry at all levels, from graduate to senior management. To book an ad contact Sam on 020 7099 9060 or email ads@unlimitedmedia.co.uk

Letter to be sent to 3000 former Warner interns in ongoing lawsuit
Over 3000 former Warner Music interns in the US will receive a letter informing them about a class action lawsuit being pursued against the major over its internship practices.

While in the UK the Inland Revenue has been cracking down on the use of unpaid interns in the music industry (except where work placements fulfil exemptions to minimum wage rules), in the US various former interns have gone legal on the matter. Warner Music is on the receiving end of at least two such lawsuits, the previously reported litigation being pursued by Justin Henry, and the case that's in the news this week being led by Kyle Grant.

Many of the American cases going on just now which argue that full-time unpaid internships violate US employment laws are class actions, meaning that if they prevail anyone who completed a similar internship with the same company could also claim damages. Targeted employers are unsurprisingly trying to block said lawsuits from attaining class action status, arguing that everyone's internship is different, and some may have fallen within 'trainee exceptions' allowed under the relevant laws.

But yesterday the judge hearing Grant's case said that - while not commenting on the merits of the lawsuit itself - there was a sufficiently strong argument for court-authorised notices to be mailed to anyone else who may be eligible to join the class action, and that mailing will now take place. And although that's just one small step for Grant's legal team, lawyers for the former intern certainly seem to think that the decision adds credence to their wider case.

There are a number of similar internship cases currently going through the motions, most involving entertainment businesses, though not exclusively music. Those targeted will be watching the other cases closely, especially when it comes to judicial consideration on the definition of 'internship' and the reach of the 'trainee exceptions', though it is possible that some defendant companies, like the Elite Model Management firm has just done, might try to kill the dispute quicker and reach a settlement with former interns out of court.

Chainsmokers sign Sony/ATV publishing deal
Craze-capitalising '#Selfie' hitmakers The Chainsmokers, aka NYC-based EDM DJs Alex Pall and Andrew Taggart, have signed a supposedly seven-digit publishing deal with Sony/ATV. Because yeah, it really is that easy.

Sony/ATV chair Marty Bandier says he was already engaged in talks with the pair even pre the release of their best-selling single/viral clip '#Selfie', which became the "whipped cream to the cake", adding: "It made us add a little more money to the deal. I do mean a little".

Yeah, right. The Chainsmokers also joined Universal's Republic Records at the top of the month, signing a multi-LP contract worth, sources say, over $1 million. They initially released '#Selfie' via Steve Aoki's Dim Mak imprint, facilitated by a distribution deal between Dim Mak and Republic. Since then, the single has, Billboard estimates, generated over $2 million in income.

Sony Corp confirms losses, with more to come
Sony Corp's net loss for the year ending 31 Mar was announced yesterday as ¥128.4 billion (£752 million), in line with the revised profit warning issued earlier this month and around three times the ¥41.5 billion (£243 million) loss the entertainment and electronics giant made last year. The company predicted further losses this year too, as it restructures and sells off unprofitable businesses.

Much of these losses came at the end of the year, as quarterly losses rose to ¥138.2 billion (£810 million), mainly due to costs resulting from the sale of the corporation's PC business. Looking forward, the company predicts sales across the group will be flat this year, though without the big one-off costs of the last twelve months, the company should return to a ¥50 billion loss for the year to 31 Mar 2015.

On the plus side though, Sony's music businesses are doing quite well, with revenues up 13.9% year-on-year to ¥503.3 billion (£2.95 billion). Though this was largely due to currency fluctuations (as money moves from Sony Music's US base through to the Japanese parent company), with recorded music sales actually declining, despite some offset from an increase in digital income. Sony Music's top selling artists of 2013/4 included One Direction, Daft Punk, Beyonce and Miley Cyrus.

On the publishing side, Sony/ATV's EMI Music Publishing subsidiary was cited as the main source of a 34.9% increase in overall operating income (though again, currency fluctuations played a role here).

In summary: PCs bad, currency fluctuations good.

MPs warn new government guidance on secondary ticketing doesn't go far enough
The government has issued new guidelines to secondary ticketing platforms to increase transparency. However, the All Party Parliamentary Group on Ticket Abuse has warned that the new conditions do not go far enough. The new rules will come into play on 13 Jun, and require secondary ticketing sites to show the seat number of tickets sold via their platforms, and in some cases the face value of the original ticket.

But the APPG is also pushing for these websites to have to show who the seller of a ticket is - particularly where it's actually the show's promoter or the resale site itself - and also for assurances that fans will be compensated for travel and accommodation expenses if and when tickets turn out to be fake or cancelled. As previously reported, the APPG reckons these new regulations could become law via amendments to the current Consumer Rights Bill.

Following a debate on the issue, Conservative Co-Chair of the APPG Mike Weatherley said: "This is the first concession from the government that there is a real problem with transparency in the secondary market, and the publication of this guidance represents a welcome, although limited, step forward. Secondary ticketing websites now have a month to ensure that they comply with these new responsibilities, and I hope they accept the need to do so".

However, he continued: "These small changes still don't go far enough to ensure that consumers have all the relevant information they need to make a buying decision. In particular, consumers still won't know who they're actually buying a ticket from, which we wouldn't stand for in any other marketplace".

His Labour counterpart on the APPG Sharon Hodgson added: "We welcome any movement from ministers on this issue, and over the next few weeks we will be meeting with ministers from both the Department Of Media, Culture & Sport and the Home Office to discuss the wider set of recommendations in our report".

Hodgson also had a 'but' though, pressing further the Group's view that further measures should be applied in law, saying: "We still believe that the Consumer Rights Bill is the ideal vehicle through which to extend transparency and recourse in the secondary market, to ensure that it works in the interests of consumers and those whose talent and investment create the demand for tickets in the first place. We will therefore continue to press the government to act to put fans first".

As previously reported, following the announcement last month of the APPG's proposals for new secondary ticketing regulations, a Ticketmaster spokesperson said that the parliamentary group had "not listened to industry advice" and that the proposals could "harm the secondary ticketing industry, and more importantly, the fans".

Rival platform Viagogo later agreed that increased transparency would "make it more difficult to use secure resale platforms" and therefore "drive people back to the black market, where there's no consumer protection and legislation can't be enforced".

Hodgson tweeted at the time that Ticketmaster's response was "disappointing", saying that implementation of the APPG's proposals would actually "build confidence in their service".

Alan McGee launches Creation Management, signs The Jesus & Mary Chain
Alan McGee has announced the relaunch of Creation as a management company, with his first clients being The Jesus & Mary Chain.

McGee told Music Week: "The Mary Chain were the first band I ever managed when I was 23. That was 30 years ago and they exploded really fast. By the time I was 24, they were number one in Germany and other places. Jim [Reid] was 22, I was 24 and Douglas [Hart] was seventeen. It was fucking nuts, if you think about it. We were kids! Now, I'm 53 - I suppose that's kind of the normal age of a manager in a lot of ways".

He added: "Creation Management are going to sign a couple of baby bands, but the main thing for us [initially] is to do the Mary Chain right".

The Jesus & Mary Chain kick off their new management deal with South American and US dates, followed by three UK shows at which they will perform their 1985 debut album 'Psychocandy' in full. The band will play London's Troxy on 19 Nov, The Academy in Manchester on 20 Nov, and Glasgow Barrowlands on 21 Nov.

McGee is launching the company with business partner Simon Fletcher, and will continue to run his 359 record label.

Major labels take minority stakes in Shazam
The three major labels - Universal, Sony and Warner - have all taken minority stakes in music identification service Shazam, according to The Wall Street Journal.

The WSJ states that each company has invested $3 million in Shazam, which is valued at around $500 million.

Shazam has increasingly been entering into marketing partnerships with major label artists recently, and earlier this year signed a deal to launch its own label as part of the Warner Music Group.

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Musicians protest loss of net neutrality
Lots of famous musicians, Michael Stipe for starters, have added their weight to the ongoing net neutrality debate in the US, which is back in the news because America's media regulator the FCC is reviewing its internet rules following a court battle with net giant Verizon.

The basic principle of net neutrality is that, as data moves over the net, all data is treated the same oblivious of origin. Some in the net sector want to offer a virtual fastlane, which would give data from certain sources - ie companies or institutions who pay a premium - priority. But there are plenty of opponents to that idea, including the stack of artists who have put their names to an open letter written by the Future Of Music Coalition to Tom Wheeler, chairman at the FCC.

The note, which also carries signatures from Fugazi, Eddie Vedder, Jeff Magnum, Tune-Yards and Tom Morello, urges Wheeler and the FCC to re-think the new set of rules it's due to consider later today, after a leak of current proposals suggests the FCC, previously a supporter of net neutrality, is about to change its stance. The Future Of Music Coalition argues that the new proposals favour big corporations and "telecom giants", leaving "individual artists and creators" in the cold.

The final bit of the letter, which is printed here in its entirety, reads: "Your proposed path would open the door to widespread discrimination online. It would give internet service providers the green light to implement pay-for-priority schemes that would be disastrous for start-ups, non-profits and everyday internet users who cannot afford these unnecessary tolls. We urge you to scrap these proposed rules and instead restore the principle of online non-discrimination by reclassifying broadband as a telecommunications service".

RAJAR Round-Up: Evans up, Grimmy down, digital growing
RAJAR time everybody. RAY-JAR, RAY-JAR, RAY-JAR. So, you're all asking, what are the most interesting stats in this batch of quarterly radio listening figures? Well, here are some stats. Some may be interesting.

1. Radio 2 had a good RAJAR quarter, with overall reach up to 15.57 million, compared to 15.51 million last quarter and 15.27 million last year. The Chris Evans breakfast show also continued to grow its audience.

2. Elsewhere at the Beeb, Radio 1 saw its audience increase year on year to 10.5 million, though that is down compared to last quarter. Its breakfast show with Nick Grimshaw saw its audience slip - he is now talking to 850,000 less people than his predecessor in the job Chris Moyles - though it's listeners over 25 who are tuning out, while the number of under 25s listening in is up, which will please the station's bosses who have been busy trying to meet BBC Trust targets to ensure they better engage the youth audience.

3. Onto commercial stations and, in London, Bauer's Magic is back on top, pushing rival Capital into second place in terms of audience size in the city. Magic's sister station Kiss is now in third place in the London market, with Capital's sister outfit Heart fourth.

4. In terms of the analogue-to-digital-listening story, in London FM and AM listening now accounts for just 48.6% overall, with 55% of London radio listeners tuning in via a digital platform at some point.

5. In the digital domain, Bauer probably scores best amongst the commercial players, its acquisition of Absolute having helped of course. The top six best performing commercial digital-only stations are all in the Bauer fold: Absolute 80s, Kerrang!, The Hits, Kisstory, Heat and Absolute Radio 90s.

So those are some of the most significant level stats (were they interesting? Answers on a postcard please). And if that's got you in a RAJAR kind of mood, go check out Matt Deegan's always insightful commentary on the latest ratings batch.

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Simon Cowell launches South American telly talent show
Simon Cowell and Sony's JV media-farm Syco Entertainment has 'created' a new 'Popstars: The Rivals'-style American TV talent series designed, in this case, to find the ultimate Latino boyband.

The show is titled 'La Banda' (or 'The Band'), and will scan the USA, Mexico, Central America, South America, the Caribbean and Puerto Rico for aspiring pop vocalists. The star prize is a joint contract with Sony Music Latin and Syco Music.

SiCo says this of the new franchise, which will first air on Spanish-speaking network Univision in 2015: "I'm delighted to be partnering with Univision on this new format. They are fantastically ambitious and most importantly for 'La Banda' they are totally focused on discovering and creating the next music superstars. There is a huge opportunity for this band and we are going to be giving the power via this show to the millions of teenage fans".

Reciprocating in kind, Univision's President Of Programming And Content, Alberto Ciurana, said: "Univision's collaboration with Simon Cowell's Syco Entertainment is part of our commitment to innovation and to raising the bar in entertainment for our audiences and partners. 'La Banda' will tap into Hispanic America's passion for music unlike any other program on television and will bring millions of fans the next international musical sensation".

Pop misogyny debate turns to music videos, empowerment and porn at The Great Escape
Having asked what steps could be taken to improve equality in the UK music industry, and what can be done about misogyny in pop when the most controversial music is coming out of the US, the third part of the 'Blurred Lines' strand at The Great Escape last week looked more deeply at music videos.

Led by Caroline Bottomley from Radar Music Videos, the debate included Phil Tidy, a prolific producer who has collaborated with Diane Martel, director of the 'Blurred Lines' video; Craig Haynes, content manager for electronic music YouTube channel UKF; Jerry Barnett, founder of free speech group Sex And Censorship; and De La Muerta (aka Deborah Scanlan and Elizabeth Adams), regular directors for artists such as Kyla La Grange, Lulu James and Chlöe Howl.

Tidy began by saying that he felt that nudity in videos had become more prevalent and more accepted in recent years, but noted that the problems being debated here weren't new. As an example, he mentioned 'Bicycle Race' by Queen, which features 65 topless women riding bicycles, adding: "The lyrics in that song are massively derogatory. But I think now there are more things like that with the combination of images and lyrics".

On the personal responsibility of video directors, Adams said: "We get a lot of free rein. Obviously the people with the money do get to have their say, but we always try to speak to the artist and try to find out who they are as a person. If they want to be sexy, then that's OK, but if not, we'll do something different. The way that we make videos, we don't ever want to put anything out that adds to a sexist or misogynistic world view".

Scanlan added: "We make videos for people, not just women. We want to make videos about people, and sex is a part of that. If we just show an arse, that's serious objectification, but if you show a whole person that's OK, I think".

While not creating videos itself, UKF is a curator of music videos, and a massively popular curator at that, with over seven million subscribers. Haynes admitted that other channels within the AEI Media network, of which UKF is a part, do feature scantily clad women, but he felt that this was done in a way that was not focussed on simple titillation. Meanwhile on UKF itself, that has never been prevalent in the videos the service selects.

"I don't think UKF is actively making a stand, or avoiding that type of video, but it just doesn't fit what we're doing", he said. "There is definitely a sense of responsibility there, and ultimately you have to credit your audience with a decent amount of intelligence. If it was just girls shaking their asses, I don't think our audience would be into that. They're quick to critique videos, and they're very into stories, so it isn't right for our audience and they'd see through that".

Asked if artists like Miley Cyrus were being empowered or exploited by taking their clothes off in videos, Scanlan said: "It would be objectifying a person we don't know to say what they're doing. As long as Miley is doing it for herself, then that's fine. We're not into 'slut shaming'. As long as a person is doing it for themselves, then it's empowering".

Adams added: "I think every pop artist ever has been exploited, because there's a whole industry built around them to make money. It's how they present themselves within that".

Barnett added: "Why not the third option that she's doing what she enjoys, and she's not trying to represent all women? This language never applies to men. In the 'Blurred Lines' video, the women do seem to be in powerful roles. They're nearly always standing, looking into the camera. It's only women this standard is applied to, never to men".

He added: "No one would have batted an eyelid over 'Blurred Lines' in the 90s. This is more about moral panic than anything else".

That moral panic, he felt, was one being engineered to allow for new censorship laws to be passed. The panel all agreed that putting age ratings on music videos online, something the BBFC has announced it will pilot this year, would be in effectual.

"Our business model is based on more views, so it would harm us to limit it", said Haynes. "The easiest way to get kids to watch something is to tell them they can't. Some channels are skewed to younger people, but say they're 18+ to get that audience".

On where this would lead, Barnett said: "First you put age ratings on this and everyone ignores them. Then David Cameron says, it's outrageous that this isn't working, now we need to do X, Y, Z. I think later this year we'll see moves to put internet censorship into law. The BBFC will start age rating videos, and then they'll go back and say this isn't working because the internet lets everyone in".

Listen to the debate in full here.

Read part one of the debate here, and part two here. Tomorrow we'll look at whether 'Blurred Lines' should have been banned by British radio stations.

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Ignore email at your peril, says fan engagement panel at The Great Escape
One of the key messages to come out of the Building A Fan Business strand at the CMU Insights-programmed Great Escape Convention last week was the continued importance of email as a key channel for communicating to fans.

And honing in on that point was Kevin Kiernan from rGenerator, the direct-to-consumer agency that grew out of Sony Music and which now works with music and entertainment clients from across the industry.

Asked for a speedy list as to why the gathering of fan email addresses should remain a top priority for artists and their business partners Kiernan identified a number of reasons: email provides better insights and analytics, the artist owns the data and doesn't have to pay Facebook to ensure their whole community sees a message, and perhaps most importantly, email is simply a more commercial channel than social.

"We don't count on Facebook and Twitter to create commerce", Kiernan explained. "But rather to drive people into the funnel, ultimately to drive them to email. People still trust email for hearing about and doing business. They use the other channels for community, but when it comes to buying things they want a little more focus, and you get that from email".

Social networking, of course, remains important for building awareness and nurturing a community, and may well continue to generate more traffic than email, but assuming a key component of the fan relationship is ultimately selling products and services to fans, then the inbox remains an important touchpoint.

You can hear Kiernan's insights on the importance of email in full here.

Music Business School and London School Of Sound announce alliance
Two music education groups have announced a new alliance that will see them amalgamate their back-office and marketing functions and create a number of new courses. The two organisations set to work together are the Music Business School and the sound-engineering-focused London School Of Sound.

Confirming the alliance, MBS Director Steve Melhuish told CMU: "This partnership is all about two dynamic educators joining together to improve to what they're offering in their separate courses. LSS has been our landlord for a while, so it seems only natural that we should cosy up. Together, we're offering a comprehensive and flexible approach to training the next generation of successful artists and music executives".

Meanwhile Federico Bersano Begey, Course Director at LSS added: "I had been looking at Steve Melhuish's Music Business School for a few years, and I always thought their approach to real-world education was far superior to what I could see from other universities and colleges. Finally we can make these courses available to a wider audience and increase their value even further with the services and facilities that LSS already offers to the students of its Music Production Certificates".

  Approved: Mr Scruff
Andy Carthy, aka Mr Scruff, is back with his new album 'Friendly Bacteria' next week, his first studio album since 2008's 'Ninja Tuna', and in Carthy's own words it's "tougher, sparser, less samples, more bass [with] more vocals and collaborations and shorter tunes".

This low end funk guru has certainly not lost his sheen, as is clear as soon as the opening tune 'Stereo Breath' hits you with its heavy beats and electro wibbles; after which the album bats through brilliantly for the duration. Funky with some real low end punch, Scruff may be getting close to having completed two decades in music production, but he's certainly not resting on his laurels.

The album features a series of vocal collaborations with fellow Mancunian Denis Jones, and Carthy even ropes in the legendary Robert Owens for 'He Don't'. While elsewhere you'll find the grossly underrated UK soulstress Vanessa Freeman on lush vocal duties. The solo stuff is great too, with 'We Are Coming' being the highlight of the album - a true journey into Carthy's genial electrofunk.

Scruff will headline an all-dayer at The Roundhouse in London on 31 May - details here - which also features Portico Quartet, Fatima & The Eglo Live Band, Werkha, Alexander Nut and Trevor Jackson.

Now check out Scruff and Jones together in action on the video for 'Render Me'.
CLICK HERE to read and share online
 

Release Round-Up: Nero, Sia, East India Youth, Stone's Throw, The Dø and Len
Hi, here's a thing - an exciting, electro-themed thing - to do with Brit dance trio Nero, who've been away doing God knows what for a while now. To be specific, it's a single titled 'Satisfy', and is already available to buy on iTunes following its first play on Zane Lowe's BBC Radio 1 show earlier this week.

Here it is

And another thing. Pop machine Sia has switched 180° from writing hits for other artists, and gone and made a solo LP. Right on, Sia. Its name is '1000 Forms Of Fear', which may sound nightmarish, but it can't possibly be, since it features Sia's shiny-bright new single 'Chandelier'. 8 Jul is the date of its release, kids. And with that, it's time to throw the spotlight straight back onto 'Chandelier'.

East India Youth, aka William Doyle, has released the new video for his new single 'Heaven How Long', a chip off his first and only LP 'Total Strife Forever'. The single itself will follow on 16 Jun.

Doyle says of the Joe Spray and Dan Tombs-created clip, which traces the a similar narrative to that of his past ones: "I was keen to keep Joe Spray on as director for this video because his contribution to the aesthetics of my album and its surrounding material have been a key part in whatever success they've found. Dan has been creating visuals for my live shows based on Joe's video work, and it's been a great collaborative effort working with him. I was really pleased that both Joe and Dan were keen to add their own styles to this video; together they've created something beautiful, schizophrenic and intensely visceral".

See if that's a fair estimation by checking 'Heaven How Long' here.

In DVD release news, hip hop imprint Stones Throw Records is putting out its 'history of' film, 'Our Vinyl Weighs A Ton', in that and various other digital/physical formats on 27 May. Physical copies will be paired with a CD featuring the doc's 25 track score, which is produced by Madlib. Play its trailer, and Madlib's special 'Our Vinyl' commission 'Cue 06', here.

Alt-pop twosome The Dø, otherwise known as Olivia Merilahti and Dan Levy, have confirmed the release of a new track, the first sign of their still-TBA third LP. It bears the title 'Keep Your Lips Sealed', and you should probably emulate that as you listen to it now.

Finally, the always-inventive Alcopop! Records has dreamt up a barely believable exclusive as its 100th ever release. Basically, it's a reissue of Len's now fifteen year old hit, 'Steal My Sunshine'. As in, Len. Len.

The single is limited to 100 pressings only, and is available either by itself, or with a combination of merch items, like t-shirts and 'Lensed' shades. Here are the details, and here is 'Steal My Sunshine'.


Musical rich lists published
What, is it Sunday Times Rich List time already? Yes, it is. And ahead of this weekend's big list of famous loot hoarders, here are the customary top tens of musical money bags.

While the super-rich musical youngsters are all pop stars you'll know, in case you wondered about a couple of the names in the main list, Len owns Warner Music and Clive used to own one-time pop power house Zomba. Oh, and Russian model, reality TV star and steel-millionaire-spouse Kamaliya Zahoor supported Steps on their reunion tour in 2012. Which definitely qualifies her as a music person.

So here are the pop rich top tens in full, with each individual's estimated fortune in brackets. You can decide for yourself who to hate the most.

Richest music types in the UK...
1. Len Blavatnik (£10 billion)
2. Clive Calder (£1.4 billion)
3. Cameron Mackintosh (£1 billion)
4. Paul McCartney and Nancy Shevell (£710 million)
5. Lord Lloyd-Webber (£640 million)
6. U2 (£428 million)
7. Simon Fuller (£382 million)
=8. Simon Cowell (£300 million)
=8. Mohammad and Kamaliya Zahoor (£300 million)
10. Elton John (£260 million)

Richest music types in the UK under 30...
1. Adele (£45 million)
2. Calvin Harris (£30 million)
3. Cheryl Cole (£16 million)
=4. Niall Horan (£14 million)
=4. Zayn Malik (£14 million)
=4. Liam Payne (£14 million)
=4. Harry Styles (£14 million)
=4. Louis Tomlinson (£14 million)
=9. Leona Lewis (£13 million)
=9. Marcus Mumford and Carey Mulligan (£13 million)

 
ANDY MALT | Editor
Andy heads up the team, overseeing the CMU bulletin and website, coordinating features and interviews, reporting on artist and business stories, and contributing to the CMU Approved column.
Email andy@unlimitedmedia.co.uk (except press releases, see below)
   
CHRIS COOKE | Co-Publisher, Business Editor & Insights Director
Chris provides music business coverage, writing key business news and analysis. Chris also leads the CMU Insights training and consultancy business, and is MD of CMU publisher UnLimited Media.
Email chris@unlimitedmedia.co.uk (except press releases, see below)
   
ALY BARCHI | Staff Writer
Aly reports on artist news, coordinates the festival, gig and release round up columns, and contributes to the CMU Approved column. She also writes for CMU's sister title ThisWeek London.
Email aly@unlimitedmedia.co.uk (except press releases, see below)
   
SAM TAYLOR | Commercial Manager & Insights Associate
Sam oversees the commercial side of the CMU media, leading on sales and sponsorship, plus helps manage and deliver the CMU Insights training courses and consultancy services.
Email sam@unlimitedmedia.co.uk or call 020 7099 9060
   
CARO MOSES | Co-Publisher
Caro helps oversee the CMU media, while as a Director of UnLimited Media she heads up the company's other two titles ThisWeek London and ThreeWeeks Edinburgh, and supports other parts of the business.
Email caro@unlimitedmedia.co.uk
Send ALL press releases to musicnews@unlimitedmedia.co.uk - this is checked daily by the whole editorial team meaning your release will definitely get to the right person.

For details of the training and consultancy services offered by CMU Insights click here - Andy and Chris are also available to provide music business comment, just email them direct.

To promote your company or advertise jobs or services to the entire UK music industry via the CMU bulletin or website contact Sam on 020 7099 9060 or email ads@unlimitedmedia.co.uk
© UnLimited Publishing at division of UnLimited Media

CMU, Fl2 Unicorn House, 221 Shoreditch High Street, London, E1 6PJ.
t: 020 7099 9050 (editorial) 020 7099 9060 (sales)

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