An UnLimited Media Bulletin
Friday 16 May 2014

 
TODAY'S TOP STORY: Sony Music has responded to the most recent filing in a long-running royalties dispute between the major and country star Brad Paisley, arguing that the singer's latest litigation was mainly designed to generate press interest in the case. Which, if true, means it was a success. As previously reported, a judge previously restrained Paisley's ability to sue for allegedly unpaid royalties as far back as... [READ MORE]
 
TODAY'S APPROVED: Formerly known as East Village and before that Medicine Bar, Trapeze plays host to the delectable disco house guru Joey Negro and Maxi Jazz from Faithless tomorrow night. Headlining the basement, Negro will be joined by Ronnie Turner, and resident Stuart Patterson. Meanwhile, upstairs Jazz will headline above Tim Keenoy. A great venue, whatever the name, with some great programming... [READ MORE]
   
BEEF OF THE WEEK: Two years ago, a music investment organisation called Icebreaker was accused by The Times of being little more than a tax avoidance scheme. Though Icebreaker itself - which invested in various music projects, often with artists looking to work outside the traditional label system - argued that it's reason for existing was to invest in innovative music projects, it just made use of tax breaks... [READ MORE]
TOP STORIES Sony responds to Brad Paisley's latest royalty dispute manoeuvre
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LEGAL Cavern Club reaches out to Seminole Tribe leader in continuing trademark dispute
Settlement reached in Electric Picnic dispute
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DEALS Kaytranada signs to XL
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LIVE BUSINESS ASA rejects complaint against Ticketmaster over secondary ticket promotion
Earth booking agency opens
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MANAGEMENT & FUNDING Music Export Growth Scheme accepting applications for third round of artist funding
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MEDIA Tulisa Contostavlos to star in reality show
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THE GREAT ESCAPE More clarity is the biggest demand when artists debate the streaming sector
Should Blurred Lines have been banned on British radio? The Great Escape debates
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GIGS & FESTIVALS Pusha T, Rustie, Fabio & Grooverider for London's Converse CONS Project
Festival Line-Up Update: Festival No 6, Camden Crawl, Sonisphere and more
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AWARDS Latitude Festival receives award for disabled access facilities
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AND FINALLY... CMU Beef Of The Week #206: Gary Barlow v The Tax Man
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Click JUMP to skip direct to a section of this email or ONLINE to read and share stories on the CMU website (JUMP option may not work in all email readers). For regular updates from Team CMU follow us on Twitter, Facebook or Tumblr.
 
 
MINISTRY OF SOUND - SYNC LICENSING MANAGER
Ministry of Sound are looking for an experienced Sync Licensing Manager to handle all areas our sync licensing for our new artists and tracks as well as our back catalogue, making sure revenue is maximised and proactively seeking out new sync opportunities.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
AUDIO - PROMOTIONS MANAGER
Brighton's number one music venue Audio and Above Audio is recruiting a Promotions Manager. Regarded as one of the best small clubs in the UK, Audio regularly hosts some of the worlds best DJ's and is also a well established live music venue. Above Audio, one of Brighton's premier cocktail bars, boasts the largest back bar, and is home to some of the finest mixologists in the city.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
[PIAS] ARTIST & LABEL SERVICES - INTERNATIONAL DIGITAL SALES MANAGER
[PIAS] A&L Services have a vacancy within the A&L National Accounts Team as International Digital Sales Manager. The role has responsibility for maximising digital revenues outside of the core [PIAS] territories as well as coordinating activity and campaigns on a pan-territory basis.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
ALPHA MUSIC PUBLISHING UK LTD - ROYALTY AND ADMINISTRATION MANAGER
We are a small but very established French music publisher looking for a French-speaking Royalty And Administration Manager for our London office.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
 
   
DHP FAMILY - DIGITAL MARKETING MANAGER
Based in Nottingham, we are looking for a creative individual who has a love for the opportunities that digital media presents. Primarily working on concerts and festivals, you will be responsible for our social media channels, e-mailouts, websites and online advertisements. We expect you to be able to deliver reach, growth and engagement with our online community, and be able to lead the development of our online marketing strategy going forward.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
TICKETMASTER - CLIENT SERVICES MANAGER - MUSIC
Reporting to the Head of Client Account Management, the Client Services Manager – Music, will be responsible for the management of all aspects of Ticketmaster’s client relationships (Music) whilst working closely with Directorial and Regional ‘stakeholders’ in the development, and execution, of current and future business strategies.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
ACADEMY MUSIC GROUP - WEBSITE PRODUCTION COORDINATOR
Responsible as part of the digital team for the front-end maintenance of the website and email templates, producing HTML/CSS web pages and graphics to reflect key promotional activities and online communications.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
DOMINO - PARALEGAL / BUSINESS AFFAIRS ASSISTANT
Domino seeks a Paralegal / Business Affairs Assistant to join record label and publishing company assisting the Business Affairs department. Reporting to the Business Affairs Manager and Company Directors, the role will provide every opportunity for the successful candidate to develop their commercial and legal skills in the music industry.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
SOUND ADVICE - MUSIC LAWYER
Sound Advice is a London based law firm specialising in the music industry, focusing mainly on the representation of artists and managers. We have a client roster to be proud of, from home and abroad. We are looking for an experienced lawyer to join us.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
FUGA - SALES & BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT REPRESENTATIVE
FUGA are looking to expand our London-based team with a Sales & Business Development Representative to develop the market, drive revenue and manage client relations in the UK.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
AEI MEDIA - ROYALTIES ASSISTANT
AEI Media Ltd are seeking an experienced and passionate Royalties Administrator to join their team; the role will sit within a dynamic accounting function and report directly into the Finance Manager.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
AEI MEDIA - FINANCE ASSISTANT
AEI Media Ltd are seeking an articulate and ambitious Finance Assistant; the role will sit within a dynamic accounting function and report directly into the Finance Manager.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
 
CMU Jobs is a proven way to recruit the best music business talent for roles across the industry at all levels, from graduate to senior management. To book an ad contact Sam on 020 7099 9060 or email ads@unlimitedmedia.co.uk

Sony responds to Brad Paisley's latest royalty dispute manoeuvre
Sony Music has responded to the most recent filing in a long-running royalties dispute between the major and country star Brad Paisley, arguing that the singer's latest litigation was mainly designed to generate press interest in the case. Which, if true, means it was a success.

As previously reported, a judge previously restrained Paisley's ability to sue for allegedly unpaid royalties as far back as 2002, stating that a 2006 agreement between the singer and the label meant that by 2011 - when this particular dispute first reached court - the country man had missed a window of opportunity to make any claims regarding payments that may or may not have been made prior to the 2006 arrangement.

In his most recent lawsuit Paisley's lawyers argue that the 2006 agreement was conditional on Sony Music sharing a big bunch of paperwork about their client's royalties, and that the major had failed to do so, making commitments made by the singer in that contract now void. The new lawsuit also made reference to download income, suggesting that Paisley plans to morph this dispute into one over digital royalties, the most fashionable of all the royalty gripes open to veteran artists in 2014.

But in a legal filing this week, Sony Music denies it failed to provide documentation to Paisley, countering that it was his people who were decidedly slack when it came to auditing his earnings and royalties to date. "In total, Sony Music has produced approximately 40,000 pages of documentation" the filing states, adding that Team Paisley "have been silent or lethargic and squandered multiple opportunities to advance the case". The allegation that Sony had refused to provide paperwork in line with its 2006 agreement with Paisley was "objectively false", it concluded.

And as for Paisley's motivation for filing his most recent legal claim against the major: "This motion is being used as a publicity stunt to revive an otherwise moribund case ... [the] plaintiff's tabloid tactic is apparently an attempt to steer this case away from the objective facts. He is taking the wrong approach".

The wrong approach maybe, but quite a fun one. Let the squabbling continue.

Cavern Club reaches out to Seminole Tribe leader in continuing trademark dispute
Owners of the modern day Cavern Club in Liverpool have appealed to the Council Chairman of the Seminole Tribe Of Native Americans in Florida in a bid to end a long-running trademark dispute in the US.

Although iconic as a musical hub during Liverpool's rock n roll heyday in the 1960s and because of its resulting associations with The Beatles, and despite a British Rail initiated shutdown in the 1970s, The Cavern Club continues to operate as a music venue based on the city's Mathew Street to this day. But in 1994 the Hard Rock Café group in the US trademarked the iconic name Stateside, and has been exploiting it ever since, much to the annoyance of the Liverpool venue's management.

But then in 2007 the Hard Rock company was acquired by the Seminole Tribe Of Native Americans in a $965 million deal. So now, as the Cavern Club in Liverpool pursues new legal efforts to stop the rock-nostalgia-employing burger seller from using its name, the venue's owners have reached out to James E Billie, Council Chairman of the tribe, and also a Grammy-nominated musician himself, performing as Chief Jim Billie, asking the ultimate overseer of the Hard Rock business to intervene.

Speaking to the Liverpool Echo, Cavern Club director Bill Heckle said: "We are sure that as a musician Chief Jim Billie will see the history and the right to our claim. This trademark row began long before the Seminole Tribe took ownership of the Hard Rock, so we don't consider it's of their making. If Chief Jim Billie instructs the Hard Rock to try to see it our way not only will right be done but we'll put him and his band on at The Cavern Club as part of the deal".

Expanding on the long-running dispute, and Hard Rock's use of the Cavern name, Heckle's co-director Dave Jones added: "It is absurd for a billiards room in Boston to be passed off as having anything whatsoever to do with the history and heritage of music's most famous club in the world. The Boston Hard Rock is also selling merchandise not only with the words Cavern Club on it but also bearing an image of the fascia of the real Cavern Club in Liverpool and an image of Beatles boots. It's an outrageous insinuated claim to an association with fame that has nothing whatsoever to do with them".

While on the Cavern's decision to continue fighting in this dispute after all these years, Jones added: "Although no music fan in their right mind would believe now that a Boston burger café has anything to do with the history of The Beatles and the legacy of rock music, what could happen in the future if we do not fight for right and for our rights? If this dispute is not put right, perhaps in some decades' time kids might be confused into believing that the four lads who actually changed the world from a cellar bar in Liverpool instead started out at a Hard Rock. And that would be a travesty of history and a tragedy for music heritage".

Chief Jim Billie is yet to respond.

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Settlement reached in Electric Picnic dispute
A legal dispute between the companies behind Ireland's Electric Picnic festival has been settled just before it was due to reach a court room in Dublin this week.

The company of Electric Picnic founder John Reynolds, POD Music, claimed that UK festival maker and Live Nation subsidiary Festival Republic, which bought a majority stake in the Irish event in 2009, had breached a shareholders agreement in freezing him out of certain decision making processes.

According to the Irish Times, Reynolds also claimed that decisions made by Festival Republic regarding the 2012 and 2013 editions of Electric Picnic had been damaging to his company. For its part, Festival Republic argued that Reynolds had engaged in a "deliberately obstructive pattern of behaviour", possibly as part of a bid to force the Live Nation company to buy out his shares at a "grossly inflated price".

Part of the dispute centred on the volume discounting of tickets for the event, and the judge overseeing the case had secured orders that would have forced Ticketmaster to share information about volume discounts that were agreed on tickets for Electric Picnic from 2009 to 2013.

But in the end no such revelations were required, because at the last minute a confidential out of court settlement was reached. The judge adjourned the case until 3 Jun so that the settlement can be implemented, at which date the Irish office of Festival Republic says it expects the whole case to be struck out.

Kaytranada signs to XL
21 year old Haitian-Canadian beat-man Kaytranada, real name Kevin Celestin, has signed to XL Recordings. The label will release Celestin's new EP - which will, he tells The Fader, feature rapper Vic Mensa, singers Reva DeVito and "crazy jazz drummer" Karriem Riggins - later this year.

He typifies it like so: "It's definitely gonna surprise you. It's gonna be more abstract-feeling. I tried to do more of my unique stuff - the up tempo, neo-soul type of stuff. That's what I'm aiming for, to make it as funky as possible".

And on his choosing XL over all the labels in all the world: "It's the record label that I really wanted to put something out with for a long time. I listen to their artists - MIA, Tyler The Creator - and it's one of the labels I always wanted to be on and eventually, it happened. Maybe a few more people [will find] my stuff, my music, and give it a listen because it's on XL. It's a good label for people who are sort of lost and are like, 'Let me see what's going on'".

And with that, you can now, like, claim a free packet of misc Kaytranada tracks and mixes, he having released it earlier this week via his FB.

ASA rejects complaint against Ticketmaster over secondary ticket promotion
The Advertising Standards Authority has rejected a complaint against Ticketmaster UK, which accused the company of misleading customers by saying that it had tickets for The Cure's Royal Albert Hall show on 28 Mar, while actually directing fans towards more expensive tickets on its secondary ticking site Get Me In.

The complainant said that they had logged onto the Ticketmaster website in time for when tickets went on sale for the Cure show at 9.30am on 31 Jan. However, despite repeated searches, they were never offered tickets directly, and instead given the option of going to Get Me In. They inferred that Ticketmaster itself may have listed at least some of its tickets for the concert onto its secondary site before anyone had had a chance to buy them on the primary site.

In response, Ticketmaster pointed out that it only had a certain allocation of all the primary tickets on offer for the show, with various other outlets also selling them, and that demand meant that 90% were sold by 9.45am. The remaining 10%, data provided to the ASA showed, were at that time reserved in other customers' shopping baskets, meaning that they were temporarily unavailable for purchase (the site holding tickets for fifteen minutes before returning them to general sale if they are not bought).

The company added that as well as suggesting users go to the Get Me In website to see if any tickets were available there, it also recommended that customers search the main Ticketmaster site multiple times to check if tickets previously reserved in another customer's virtual basket had become available again. However, the vast majority of primary tickets for that particular show were gone by 10am.

In its response, the ASA said it was happy that the Cure tickets available on Get Me In were being offered by various resellers, and not Ticketmaster itself. The Authority wrote: "Whilst the complainant had seen tickets listed on the online ticket marketplace to which he was directed by the Ticketmaster website very shortly after [they went on sale], the availability of those tickets appeared to be spread across a number of individual sellers rather than having stemmed from one larger allocation. We considered that that did not indicate any direct transferral of tickets by Ticketmaster to the online marketplace".

The ASA also went on to add that it was confident that the primary Ticketmaster site had been selling tickets to the Cure show at that time, even if they had been hard to come by. "Whilst we acknowledge the complainant's frustration in not having been able to purchase any tickets for the concert, we were satisfied that the evidence supplied indicated that tickets for the concert had been available through Ticketmaster from 9.30am on 31 Jan and had been sold by that company directly to individual customers".

This is not the first time that Ticketmaster has faced complaints of this type. In 2009 in the US, Bruce Springsteen got angry that fans buying tickets for two of his gigs in New Jersey via his official ticket agent - Ticketmaster - were pointed towards the TicketsNow website (that being Ticketmaster's US secondary ticketing website), where tickets for said gigs were being sold at a mark up, even before Ticketmaster's allocation of normal priced tickets had sold out.

That resulted in several investigations and civil lawsuits, and eventually saw the US Federal Trade Commission order Ticketmaster to refund the difference on marked-up secondary tickets to people who bought them to gain access to one of fourteen Springsteen shows. It also put forward new guidelines on the sale of tickets via secondary sites in the US.

In the UK, meanwhile, the All-Party Parliamentary Group on Ticket Abuse is currently pushing for new secondary ticketing regulations in the UK. Earlier this week, the government did reveal some new rules for secondary sites, though Conservative Mike Weatherley MP and Labour's Sharon Hodgson MP said that these new guidelines did not go far enough.

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Earth booking agency opens
A new London-based globally-focusing booking agency has launched with agents formerly from both Elastic Artists and Nomanis on board. The new business is called Earth Agency.

Leading the new company are ex-Elastic Artists staffers Naomi Palmer and Rebecca Prochik, one-time Nomanis agents Claire Courtney and Isla Angus, and 'operations expert' Luke Williamson.

Black Lips, Cass McCombs, JME, Omar Souleyman, SOPHIE and Atlas Sound are all on the company's books so far, as are lots of other artists whose names you'll find listed on earth-agency.com

Music Export Growth Scheme accepting applications for third round of artist funding
The third round of applications for funding from the BPI and UKTI's Music Export Growth Scheme opened yesterday.

As previously reported, originally announced last October, the scheme offers grants of between £5000 and £50,000 to UK music companies to aid international touring, artist promotion and music projects.

Announcing the new round of funding, BPI boss Geoff Taylor said: "Last year was one of the most successful years on record for artists signed to independent record companies. International chart positions and sell out shows from the likes of Arctic Monkeys, Passenger, London Grammar and Caro Emerald all contributed to the sound of success in 2013".

However, he continued: "Success like this does not happen overnight - it takes investment, expertise and creativity to help talent stand out in competitive markets. Through the Music Export Growth Scheme, BPI can help businesses and artists from England, Scotland, Northern Ireland and Wales to keep the flag flying high for British music".

The deadline for applications is 16 Jun 2014. Full details and the application form are available from the BPI's website.

Tulisa Contostavlos to star in reality show
Brainy pop boss Tulisa Contostavlos is to reveal 'the real her', since apparently we haven't seen the real her yet, in a candid new reality series.

The one-time star of THE television event of 2010, Channel 4's 'Being... N Dubz', has, claims The Mirror, signed a deal with BBC3, which will air the show later this year.

The Mirror quotes a source as saying of the 'warts-n-all-show-cum-fly-on-the-wall' (which frankly sounds gross): "Tulisa has had a number of offers but has been biding her time, finding the right one. Annoyingly her hands have been tied by the ongoing trial, and there's so much she would love to say but is not allowed to yet, legally. The series will be no holds-barred and Tulisa wants people to see the real her. She knows her image has had something of a bashing, and is determined to turn things around".

That "ongoing trial", by the way, is the one relating to TC's 'cocaine sting', aka the time she allegedly agreed to broker a drugs deal with an undercover reporter from The Sun On Sunday. Contostavlos, who was charged back in December, will attend a hearing on 25 Jun, ahead of the main trial on 14 Jul.

More clarity is the biggest demand when artists debate the streaming sector
The artist community is more frustrated about a lack of information than an immediate lack of money when it comes to the booming streaming music market, according to a panel of artists surveyed by CMU and Dan Le Sac ahead of this year's Great Escape Convention.

After discussing the survey's findings with CMU Business Editor Chris Cooke at TGE last week, Le Sac has now shared the results and his thoughts in an article for CMU, explaining that: "We chose to focus on streaming because recently that debate in particular has garnered national attention. When Thom Yorke and Nigel Godrich took to Twitter to criticise the royalties being paid by Spotify - and subsequently removed some of their tracks from the service - the debate even ended up stealing column space in the tabloids".

He noted: "Yorke and Godrich's opinions about streaming services and the payments they make to artists have been well publicised, and the attention they generated on this issue is important. But the voices of two extremely well established artists does not give us a true representation of artists at large".

It should be noted that many of those surveyed do share Yorke and Godrich's concerns that the royalties being paid to artists by the streaming services - or at least the cuts of that money being passed on by the labels - are too low, especially for newer artists whose live or merchandise income may not be so lucrative. And most do feel that labels should be paying a bigger cut to artists on streaming income than record sale or download money. But the lack of information about how royalties are calculated actually seemed to be the biggest frustration.

Noting that while half of respondents had some knowledge of how Spotify royalties work, none knew how royalties from the other services were paid, Le Sac writes: "The streaming services are handing over complex data to the bigger labels and the distributors, who then don't have either the manpower or the inclination to break this down into clear, concise numbers for the smaller labels and artists they represent. Ultimately it is easier to just add up a column and hand over some cash. But, especially if the cash payment is pretty low, many artists would like a little more information about how the sums were done".

And the lack of information - and the frustration it causes - is not only resulting in negative headlines for Spotify. Le Sac notes how many artists grew up reading a music press that portrayed the major labels "as scum", and so entered the industry already suspicious of the record industry machine. "This means that labels have to try extra hard to foster trust with their artists, especially long-term. And as the industry changes, labels want to work with artists in new ways, and that requires more trust between artists and their record companies, yet being in the dark about streaming money means there is less".

Concluding, Le Sac writes: "Ultimately, the biggest thing that the artists who responded to this survey want - and hopefully this is reflected in the rest of the community - isn't simply more money, it is clarity, to see where the streaming pennies are going and how this is all working, or could work in the future. So if there is a message for the record industry to take from this survey it would be this: tell us how things are working behind the scenes, involve us in the discussion of how to rise to the challenge of making the streaming music business work, and openly discuss with us why you feel your slice of the pie is justified".

You can read Le Sac's piece in full here.

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Should Blurred Lines have been banned on British radio? The Great Escape debates
For the final part of the 'Blurred Lines: Does Pop Have A Misogyny Problem?' strand at The Great Escape last weekend, talk turned to the airplay Robin Thicke's controversial hit has enjoyed on British radio.

Taking the title 'This house believes that 'Blurred Lines' should have been banned on British radio', the final session of the day took the format of a good old fashioned debate, with two sides stating their case and then arguing it out, under the watchful eye of Radio 1's Jen Long.

Speaking for the motion were Caitlin Hayward-Tapp from the University Of Sussex Students' Union, which did ban the song last year, and CMU Business Editor Chris Cooke, who noted that in his role as programmer of the Great Escape Convention, it had been very difficult to find anyone in the music industry or music radio willing to talk publicly in favour of banning the track from the airwaves. Meanwhile speaking against banning 'Blurred Lines' were two representatives of UK radio, Amazing Radio's Ruth Barnes, and Edward Adoo from Mi-Soul.

Taking the stage first, Hayward-Tapp explained the thinking behind the USSU's decision to ban the song from its radio station and events last autumn. "We have a duty of care towards students", she began, "and a lot of the decisions made by the union are based on a safe space policy, in which it's a priority to make sure that oppressed groups are respected and treated equally".

She added that many student unions in the UK base their policies on how to respond to sexual violence, and how to prevent it from happening at all, on a piece of research from 2010 called 'NUS Hidden Marks'.

"From that research, one in seven female students experience serious physical and possibly sexual violence as students", she said. "Over two thirds of 2058 respondents had experienced verbal or non-verbal harassment in or around their institutions. Students were the majority of the perpetrators. Coming at this from a world where sexual violence and those attitudes towards women permeate society and university culture, it's really important to take a stand against that".

The language used in the lyrics of 'Blurred Lines' correlates with what victims of sexual violence are often told by their attackers, which was one of the concerns raised when banning it.

Opposing the motion, Barnes began by noting that "the devil has the best tunes", but conceded that while "'Blurred Lines' is a great pop tune ... the lyrics are horrendous". However, despite this, she said that she was inherently against banning things, and rather felt that a song which features lyrics so clearly objectionable should be used as a starting point for further discussion.

"I'm for feminists being active on student campuses - but I would have said use 'Blurred Lines' as your anthem", she argued. "Take it to government and say, this is what our kids are listening to. These are the attitudes people have and you're not doing anything about it. We need to go on a huge sex education mission in schools and really push the difference between fantasy and reality".

Countering, Cooke conceded that back in the 1990s when he was a student at Edinburgh University - the first union to ban 'Blurred Lines' last year - he would have been totally against the song ban, opposing censorship on any grounds. However, in some cases, his view had now softened, noting that "free speech comes with responsibilities" and that meant considering the message you are sending out to people, and especially young people.

"Media censors things all the time", he added. "It's odd, isn't it, that you're not allowed to say the word 'fuck' on the radio, you're not allowed to talk about consensual fucking on the radio, yet we're allowed to play a song which makes light of sexual assault, of violence against women, which is sending out a really bad message to young people".

Finally, Edward Adoo stood up for allowing 'Blurred Lines' to be played on British radio. He noted that Pharrell Williams, co-writer of the track, has come out of this without criticism. Adoo posited: "I think the gripe is not about the record or the content, it's about Robin Thicke. No one likes him, they think he's a middle class sleazeball and they want to get rid of him. No one talks about Pharrell, who's standing their looking slick, but he's part of it, he's part of the package".

"I agree it's about education", he continued. "It's about educating the next generation, and no one wants to do it. I think it's down to government, it's down to parents, it's down to teachers to actually do something, but they don't want to, they don't feel it's their responsibility. So if a pop record can actually start the conversation, then that's a great thing".

He also wondered where record banning would stop once it started, suggesting that Radio 1's playlists could end up with very few records on them that you might actually want to listen to. "If we start banning records, then it's just gonna get boring and we're gonna have shit records, and I don't wanna hear shit records on the radio. I wanna hear good records that are provocative and controversial".

Listen to all four opening statements and the subsequent debate in full here.

And read all of our articles on the 'Blurred Lines' strand at this year's Great Escape, and listen to all four sessions in full here.

  Vigsy's Club Tip: Joey Negro and Maxi Jazz at Trapeze
Formerly known as East Village and before that Medicine Bar, Trapeze plays host to the delectable disco house guru Joey Negro and Maxi Jazz from Faithless tomorrow night.

Headlining the basement, Negro will be joined by Ronnie Turner, and resident Stuart Patterson. Meanwhile, upstairs Jazz will headline above Tim Keenoy.

A great venue, whatever the name, with some great programming.

Saturday 17 May, Trapeze 89 Great Eastern Street, Hoxton, London, EC2A 3HX, 9pm - 3am, £5-8, more info here.
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Pusha T, Rustie, Fabio & Grooverider for London's Converse CONS Project
Converse is financing a series of London-based arts workshops, talks, shows (and even a skate park, for God's sake) designed to foster creativity, banner-titled the Converse CONS Project. Centralised at the Copeland Gallery in Peckham, the ten-week scheme will launch on 29 May with a party headlined by Pusha-T, and featuring Rustie, Krept & Kronan and Scratch DVA.

The latter will also join with bass DJ Deadboy in leading a mixing class on 14 Jun. Among other music-type highlights of the programme are 'Sunday Sessions To Chart Success', a seminar on London's live scene hosted by Mixmag's Joe Muggs; a screening of UKG film 'Brandy And Code' plus a Q&A with its director Ewen Spencer; and 'The Pioneers', a live look back at early jungle, drum n bass and garage, with PAs by Fabio & Grooverider, Critical Mudsic MD Kasra, and Zed Bias.

Find details on the separate events, and register to win free tickets, here.

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Festival Line-Up Update: Festival No 6, Camden Crawl, Sonisphere and more
Big news everyone. The Pet Shop Boys are playing right at the top of this year's Festival No 6! They and the latest-added likes of Laurent Garnier, Todd Terje, Jon Hopkins and Tom Vek align with FN6 co-headliners London Grammar and Beck.

Now it's that time again, the time to move over to the main body of today's FLUUs, which include the last additions to the Camden Crawl's now-finalised 2014 listings, details on new improvements to Green Man, Iceland Airwaves and Sonisphere UK, a one-off acoustic show from Josh Homme at James Lavelle's Meltdown and the initial mail out on the line-up at Ireland's Electric Picnic.

CAMDEN CRAWL, various venues, Camden, London, 20-21 Jun: Dry The River, Sean Nicholas Savage, Sophie, Big Deal, Thumpers, The Crookes, Nai Harvest, Youth Man, The Black Tambourines, Gang, Abjects, Vodun, Lee Kern, Gaits Kandis, Lou Sanders, Spencer Jones, Max Dickens. thecamdencrawl.com

ELECTRIC PICNIC, Stradbally Hall Estate, County Laois, Ireland, 29-31 Aug: Blondie, Sinead O'Connor, Mogwai, Kelis, Neneh Cherry, The Horrors, Duke Dumont, Twin Shadow, Ham Sandwich, Clean Bandit, Drenge, The Orwells, Glass Animals, Wolf Alice, The Districts, Unknown Mortal Orchestra, Vancouver Sleep Clinic, Vaults, Benjamin Booker, Moko. www.electricpicnic.ie

FESTIVAL NO 6, various venues, Portmeirion, Wales, 4-7 Sep: Pet Shop Boys, Laurent Garnier, Todd Terje, Jon Hopkins, The Undertones, Tom Hickox, Tom Vek, Spector, Toy, Paul Heaton & Jacqui Abbott, Vaults, The Acid, Peter Hook And The Light, Denai Moore, Greg Wilson, Norman Jay, Don Letts, Low Life, Luke Solomon, Kiwi, Pete Herbert, Dicky Trisco, Guy Williams, Ray Mang, Seahawks, Jo Wallace, Gavin Kendrick. www.festivalnumber6.com

GREEN MAN, Glanusk Park, Usk Valley, Powys, Wales, 14-17 Aug: Mercury Rev, Simian Mobile Disco, Augustines, Ben UFO, Ought, The Pooh Sticks, Vancouver Sleep Clinic, H Hawkline, Huw Stephens, Heavenly Records DJs. www.greenman.net

ICELAND AIRWAVES, various venues, Reykjavik, Iceland, 5-9 Nov: FM Belfast, Son Lux, Kwabs, Jessy Lanza, Ezra Furman, Árstíðir, Lay Low, Agent Fresco, Kimono, Rachel Sermanni, Phox, Benny Crespo's Gang, Kiriyama Family, Íkorni, Strigaskór Nr 42, Odonis Odonis, Tremoro Tarantura, In The Company Of Men, Júníus Meyvant, Elín Helena, HaZar, Krakkkbot, Reptilicus, Stereo Hypnosis, Ambátt, CeaseTone, Reykjavíkurdætur, DADA, Döpur, Inferno 5. icelandairwaves.is

JAMES LAVELLE'S MELTDOWN, Southbank Centre, London, 13-22 Jun: Josh Homme. www.southbankcentre.co.uk/whatson/festivals-series/james-lavelles-meltdown-2014

SONISPHERE UK, Knebworth Park, Hertfordhsire, 4-6 Jul: HIM, Anthrax, Comeback Kid, Sweet Savage, October File, Eureka Machines, The Bots, Straight Lines, Zico Chain Black Dogs, Love Zombies, Stormzone, Shrine, Rival State, The Wild Lies, The Raven Age, Empire Kill. sonisphere.co.uk

Latitude Festival receives award for disabled access facilities
Latitude has been awarded Attitude Is Everything's Silver Award for compliance with its Charter Of Best practice for providing access for deaf and disabled festival-goers.

Says Melvin Benn, MD of Latitude promoter Festival Republic: "I am very proud and delighted that Latitude has achieved the Silver level from Attitude Is Everything this year. Festival Republic takes access at all of our events very seriously and we are committed to improving the festival experience to all of our valued disabled and deaf customers. We hope to build on our achievements this season, with the team working in conjunction with Attitude Is Everything to make our 2014 events as accessible as possible".

Attitude Is Everything CEO Suzanne Bull added: "Access provision goes beyond just building facilities for people with physical impairments; there is a wide range of provision for people who have sensory impairments and as a result, Festival Republic have been rewarded with a loyal customer base of deaf and hearing-impaired people. Latitude regularly programmes deaf and disabled artists which is important because it demonstrates the value of programming a diversity of artists to other commercial festivals".

Amongst the provisions Latitude offers are British Sign Language interpretation services for performances at the event, as well as viewing platforms for wheelchair users.

CMU Beef Of The Week #206: Gary Barlow v The Tax Man
Two years ago, a music investment organisation called Icebreaker was accused by The Times of being little more than a tax avoidance scheme.

Though Icebreaker itself - which invested in various music projects, often with artists looking to work outside the traditional label system - argued that it's reason for existing was to invest in innovative music projects, it just made use of tax breaks available to cultural ventures in order to encourage more people to pump money into the fund (as do various other music-focused investment vehicles).

However, last week a judge ruled that Icebreaker was primarily being used as a system for wealthy people to avoid paying tax on their earnings. And now various celebrities are facing demands from HM Revenue & Customs that some of that unpaid tax be handed over, most notably Take That's Gary Barlow, Howard Donald, Mark Owen and the group's manager Jonathan Wild.

Barlow has come in for the most criticism though, because he's the only one with an OBE. And a lot of people think that people with OBEs shouldn't go around trying to avoid tax. Which is, of course, true, though if anyone thinks Gary Barlow is the only one, then they're only fooling themselves.

But because of this, a lot of people started shouting about Barlow giving back his OBE. Shouting, shouting, shouting. "He might want to show a bit of contrition by giving back his OBE", shouted Labour MP Margaret Hodge. "People who have seriously abused the tax system should be stripped of their honours", screamed Conservative Charlie Elphicke, getting all red in the face and that.

Of course, you might say that more important than giving back a meaningless badge would be for Barlow to pay his fucking tax bill. But maybe that's just me.

Actually, David Cameron agreed with me, which isn't usually a position I like to be in. He went on 'Good Morning Britain' and said these words: "I don't think [giving back his OBE] is necessary, frankly. Gary Barlow has done a huge amount for the country, he's raised money for charity, he has done very well for Children In Need. The OBE was in respect of that work and what he has done. Clearly this scheme was wrong and it is right that they're going to have to pay back the money".

Now, you might argue that, in addition to all the charity work, Gary Barlow partly got his OBE for all the work he's done promoting the Conservative Party. "There's no one more with-it than David", the singer once claimed to an audience of children in Nantwich. Which I'm sure is what eventually swung the 2010 General Election. But that doesn't necessarily mean that the meaningless OBE initials should be struck from Barlow's name because of the dodgy tax thing.

Whatever, it's an open and shut case for Cameron. His celebrity buddy did something wrong, but now he's going to fix it. He's going to hand over all of that money that should have gone to that tax man in the first place. Or he will if and when Icebreaker's appeal against last week's ruling fails. Probably. I mean, if Vodafone can negotiate its way out of paying billions, then Barlow can surely have a good go at negotiating any demand downwards. After all, with all that extra money sitting in his bank account, he can afford some pretty good lawyers and accountants to help.

But maybe it's unfair to suggest that Barlow might be some kind of horrible, greedy money hoarder. After all, in his 2006 autobiography, 'My Take', he notes that finance has never been his strong point, writing: "My financial affairs were chaotic [in the early days of Take That]. As a band we were well advised, but personally things were a mess. I wanted someone to look after everything, from negotiating and buying my houses to ensuring my electricity wasn't cut off if I was away from home for six weeks".

You may have noted earlier that Jason Orange did not join the rest of his bandmates in signing up to Icebreaker. Many have wondered if his refusal to adhere to the same financial advice as Gary et al was something to do with foresight, or good moral standing. Though it may just be family loyalty, his brother Simon being a financial advisor.

In his book, Barlow reveals that he eventually got his early career affairs in order by handing over control to Simon Orange, even though this was something the Take That sibling was not keen on doing in the long term. "[Simon] was still reluctant to take the responsibility and advised me that I shouldn't give him or anyone that much power", wrote Barlow. "But I explained that's exactly what I needed and I was a good judge of character".

Let's just take a moment to remember that Gary Barlow is friendly with David Cameron. And was involved with a tax avoidance scheme that has just been deemed illegal. I'm not sure he's even a good judge of his own character.

Maybe moving forward he should stick to taking advice from his old mate Andrew Lloyd-Webber. Even though the last time that happened they wrote 'Sing' together for the Queen's Diamond Jubilee. But it was the musicals man who stood up to defend Barlow this week, saying that when you're as wealthy as the Take That star you "just do what you're advised [with your money]".

Still, he said, there are risks in just doinging what 'the man' tells you to do, as he learned first hand back in the 1970s. "The only tax scheme I ever got involved with was years ago when income tax was 98 per cent and the only thing you could possibly do was go into forestry", he told The Independent. "Forestry was a tremendous thing and I was very pleased with my forest in Glamorgan somewhere".

"Then I got a call - and we were in the middle of 'Don't Cry For Me Argentina' - and it was the army", he continued. "Why do I want to talk to the Army? There was silence, then they said 'Your forest is on fire'. After that I thought I'd be better off just paying the tax".

So take heart Gary. Even if they did force you to return that OBE medallion, at least your forest didn't burn down.

 
ANDY MALT | Editor
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ALY BARCHI | Staff Writer
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