MONDAY 6 OCTOBER 2014
TODAY'S TOP STORY: Following a meeting called by record label trade body the BPI last Friday, the UK's Entertainment Retailers Association has issued a statement this morning to say that it's not convinced by the proposed plans to switch to a global record release day of Friday. As previously reported, global labels group the IFPI is currently pushing for all the labels and entertainment retailers of the... [READ MORE]
 
TODAY'S APPROVED: Glaswegian musician Jonnie Common released his debut album, 'Master Of None', through Red Deer Club in 2011. Having shifted over to the Song, By Toad label, he's now ready to release his latest, 'Trapped In Amber', on 31 Oct. There are definite touches of The Books in places, particularly on 'Crumbs', but whether that's a genuine influence or not, Common's work is still very much... [READ MORE]
TOP STORIES ERA opposes Friday as Global Release Day
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LEGAL Grooveshark responds to ruling in Universal litigation
EMI Publishing faces new lawsuit on foreign royalties over 'Daydream Believer'
Date set for Terra Firma and Citigroup's EMI deal retrial
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LABELS & PUBLISHERS Universal Music's long-standing US distribution chief to step down
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ENTERTAINMENT RETAIL Vinyl sales could top a million this year
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DIGITAL & D2F SERVICES Apple to push for lower subscription price point for Beats
JUMP | ONLINE
ARTIST NEWS Holloways guitarist Robb Skipper dies
Jerry Dammers comments on death of Spaceape
Courtney Love to star in alt-opera
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ONE LINERS Warner Australia, Marathon Artists, Glasto tickets and more
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AND FINALLY... 50 Cent only wants to help you, Roland
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DOMINO - ONLINE PR (LONDON)
Domino is looking for an experienced Online PR to join our busy in house promo team. Intuitive, strategic, diligent, brilliant applicants welcome.

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DHP FAMILY - DEPUTY GENERAL MANAGER, RESCUE ROOMS AND STEALTH (NOTTINGHAM)
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RAYGUN - OFFICE MANAGER (BRIGHTON)
Raygun is seeking an office manager to act as a central conduit for our management, recording and publishing divisions, and to operate as day-to-day assistant to the company's managing director. The role will operate from our office in central Brighton, where the successful applicant will liaise with the director, label manager, publishing manager and head of business affairs to ensure Raygun continues to run efficiently and dynamically.

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EMMS PUBLICITY - MUSIC PR FREELANCER (LONDON)
EMMS Publicity is looking for an experienced Music PR Freelancer, for a short-term contract. You should have a proven track record of successfully launching new artists as well as managing high profile campaigns. The ideal candidate will have an exceptional writing ability and great industry contacts. You'll be required to assist on existing accounts with equal focus on both digital and print media.

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BIBLIOTHEQUE MUSIC - PRODUCTION MUSIC LIBRARY MANAGER (LONDON)
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BOZBOZ MAS - DIGITAL MARKETING SPECIALIST (BRIGHTON)
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DHP FAMILY - FESTIVAL EVENTS CO-ORDINATOR (LONDON)
Responsible for assisting the Head of Festivals to coordinate the operational elements of delivering the festivals portfolio, primarily the outdoor festivals No Tomorrow and Splendour in Nottingham. This is a newly created position which has the capacity to evolve with the right person.

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DHP FAMILY - TICKETING OPERATIONS MANAGER (NOTTINGHAM)
Concert promoter, music venue operator, festival and club organiser and band management compnay DHP Family is looking for a Ticketing Operations Manager to ensure its ticketing team effectively supports the business in the delivery of its growing events portfolio.

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HOSPITAL RECORDS - BUSINESS AFFAIRS ASSISTANT (LONDON)
Hospital Records are looking for a Business Affairs / Legal Assistant to join our dynamic team. Working directly with our Label Manager and Head of Business Affairs from our office in Forest Hill, South East London, the successful candidate will have experience and relevant training in areas of music business and entertainment law.

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DOMINO - UK MARKETING MANAGER (LONDON)
Domino is seeking a UK Marketing Manager to work as a central conduit to our existing marketing, project management and digital departments. The successful candidate will be well versed in the day-to-day running of a modern marketing campaign.

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ERA opposes Friday as Global Release Day
Following a meeting called by record label trade body the BPI last Friday, the UK's Entertainment Retailers Association has issued a statement this morning to say that it's not convinced by the proposed plans to switch to a global record release day of Friday.

As previously reported, global labels group the IFPI is currently pushing for all the labels and entertainment retailers of the world to release new music on the same day. Currently release days are spread across the week globally, with the UK taking Monday, the US Tuesday and Australia going all the way down to Friday. And although it's the Aussies' release day that seems more popular in record industry circles (majors anyway), retailers are less able to agree on when would be best to put out new releases.

Back in August indie record store owners in the US said that they were all for the idea of a consistent release day worldwide, but are not convinced by shifting to Friday. They all think that Tuesday would be just great for everyone. Especially them of course, that meaning they'd not have to change anything at all. Though their trade body The Department of Record Stores did say that there was a certain amount of flexibility.

Various other voices have since then said that they don't like Friday as a global release day either, and now ERA has joined that group. In a statement this morning the trade body's Director General Kim Bayley said: "We are grateful to the BPI for the efforts they have made to consult with UK retailers, but it seems apparent that a decision to impose a worldwide Friday release date for music is being pushed through by the international headquarters of the major record labels regardless of any input from retailers and digital services in the UK, US or elsewhere".

Saying that "ERA believes there are strong arguments in favour of adopting a global release day", she added that the push for Friday to be that day was happening "regardless of any evidence".

"A Friday release day will undoubtedly cause logistical problems and additional costs for both digital and physical retailers", she continued. "The current UK Monday release day allows for restocking and correction of metadata issues well ahead of the busy weekend period, something a Friday release day would not allow".

So, there you go, the UK's current date is the best for everyone. If there's one thing that all retailers the world over seem to be able to agree on, it's that the release day they currently have is better than any of the others.

But there was talk of evidence earlier. What's that Kim? "Consumer research in the UK indicates that music fans prefer a Monday release day. Furthermore indications are that the video industry has no intention of moving its own release day to Friday, meaning retailers will potentially have to manage two separate release days. The only justification for a Friday release date would be if it resulted in a net increase in sales. No evidence has yet been put forward that this would be the case".

Saying that, ERA is working with the IFPI, and hopes for "a more open-minded approach and to undertake genuine economic research into the impact of their plans". Bayley concluded: "If they do not, they run the risk of making a difficult trading environment for music retailers and digital services even more difficult".

Grooveshark responds to ruling in Universal litigation
Grooveshark has issued a statement following last week's potentially crippling legal ruling which said that the digital firm was liable for copyright infringement for ordering staff members to upload unlicensed recordings to its servers.

As previously reported, Grooveshark is unpopular in many music circles because it lets users upload tracks to its library, meaning it routinely hosts a plethora of recordings without permission from the labels who own them.

However, Grooveshark says that under US copyright law it is not liable for copyright infringement because users upload the uncleared content, and it operates a takedown system via which labels can have files removed. Though users will then re-upload them. The labels, therefore, argue that the streaming service is exploiting a loophole in America's Digital Millennium Copyright Act.

Though Grooveshark is liable for infringement, even with the safeguards for tech firms set out in the DMCA, if staff members rather than users upload unlicensed material, and that was the allegation in one of two lawsuits being pursued against the company by Universal Music. And last week a judge ruled in the major's favour, concluding that the evidence showed Grooveshark employees had indeed be ordered to upload files.

Grooveshark indicated it was considering an appeal as soon as last week's ruling was announced and, according to The Next Web, it has now seemingly confirmed that an appeal is underway. Meanwhile the digital firm claims that the ruling sets no precedent that hinders its current operations, arguing that the actions at the heart of Universal's lawsuit relate to a business model that the company parked in 2008.

Whether or not Universal would agree with that, it is true that last week's ruling does not contradict Grooveshark's central argument that its core user-upload-based streaming service is protected by the DMCA. The mega-major presumably hopes that, appeals pending, any damages Grooveshark is ordered to pay, in relation to the copyright infringement it instructed its staff to commit, will finish the company off.

Here is the statement in full, as published by The Next Web...

"Grooveshark cannot comment on our current litigation but I can say we are preparing for the appeal process. We can say that we will continue to operate our business ethically and honestly - with first-to-market technology as we have done since 2006. I can also say Grooveshark's current service has provided millions of dollars in revenue to artists and labels globally.

This decision dealt specifically with an early iteration of Grooveshark which we discontinued in 2008 in favor of our current music streaming service. In turn, we respectfully disagree with the decision, and we are assessing next steps, which will all focus on remaining extremely committed to ensuring we respect artist and songwriter copyrights.

Prior to 2008, the service was a paid music download platform that functioned like a 'Buy-Sell-Trade' store, in which users paid for individual tracks. This is very different from the model of our current popular music streaming service, modeled off of YouTube, in which users play songs directly through a browser without the capability of downloads.

We always knew that our service could serve as a powerful tool for labels to build engaged fan evangelism for artists. We prove this daily when we promote and socialise exclusive content to our global audience of nearly 30 million listeners. We want to support musicians just as we do our broadcasters and international partners. Grooveshark was built with the goal of connecting artists and rabid fans.

Our immediate plan of action will be to continue to serve our nearly 30 million listeners with exclusive music, brand promotions, new technology and new device partners - all exclusively for Grooveshark users - which again has been our core edict from day one".

An email at the centre of Universal's litigation, sent by Grooveshark co-founder Josh Greenberg to his staff, has been doing to rounds since last week's ruling. In it he tells his employees to add as many MP3s as possible to their Grooveshark 'sharing folders', adding "If I don't have an email from you in my inbox by Monday [confirming you've done this], you're on my official shit list". So maybe if the company needs to raise some cash to cover legal fees, it could start selling Post-It notes with the headline 'Josh's official shit list'. I'm sure some of those 30 million listeners would buy them.

Talking of which, we're planning a line of CMU coffee mugs for Christmas. You'll all buy some of those, right? The Coffee Mug Upsell we're calling it. And we won't have to use the profits to pay off Universal for past copyright infringement.

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EMI Publishing faces new lawsuit on foreign royalties over 'Daydream Believer'
The Sony/ATV-controlled EMI Music Publishing is facing another lawsuit on the issue of fees taken by the music publishing major's foreign subsidiaries. The movement of money around global music rights firms, and the commissions taken along the way, is an old favourite of artist and songwriter managers, many of whom suspect the process could be used to short-change their clients.

The latest lawsuit on the issue comes from the widow of songwriter John Stewart, a one-time member of folk-pop outfit the Kingston Trio, though in music publishing terms the fact he wrote the Monkees' hit 'Daydream Believer' is probably most important. Stewart signed a publishing deal with Screen Gems-Columbia Music in 1967, which was subsequently acquired by EMI.

Stewart's widow claims that under that deal, her late husband was due 50% of royalties generated outside the US, after any fees were taken by regional sub-publishers. But 'Daydream Believer' is, in the main, repped outside North America by other EMI Publishing subsidiaries, which then take 50% of the money before handing the rest over to the firm's US division, which pays 50% to Stewart. However, says the lawsuit, where a regional rep is another branch of EMI there should be no additional fees taken.

As previously reported, the family of Duke Ellington has been fighting a very similar lawsuit against EMI based on the same dispute. In that case the publisher won at first instance, with a judge ruling that EMI subsidiaries established since the original contract was signed could charge fees as monies moved through the system, even though they are all ultimately part of the same business. Ellington's grandson is currently appealing.

Legal reps for Stewart reckon she could be due $450,000 in lost royalties if successful in the case. EMI is yet to comment on the litigation.

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Date set for Terra Firma and Citigroup's EMI deal retrial
Ah, remember when Terra Firma owned EMI? They were happy, heady days. I miss em. The job culls. The amusing statements from big cheese Guy Hands. The random short-lived hires from Planet Tech and FMCG Central. The unhappy artists bad mouthing management to the press. The billion dollar debts and the constant rumours of doom, gloom and repossession, and then the actual day of doom, gloom and repossession. And above all, I miss the threat of libel action.

Anyway, as regular viewers will remember, there is one final chapter of Terra Firma's EMI adventure that was never fully closed. Its legal battle with the wanker bankers at Citigroup over the advice they gave Hands that led to him buying the record company in the first place, resulting in a blood-letting of Terra Firma cash.

Hands claimed that Citi man David Wormsley lied about another bidder for EMI, which made Terra Firma rush to a decision to acquire the music company. Citigroup was also working for EMI at the time, and stood to gain from the massive loans it provided to help fund the deal. Those massive and highly public loans - which couldn't be restructured down the line as originally planned once the credit crunch had, well, crunched - made it nigh on impossible for the revamped EMI under Terra Firma's control to become a viable concern.

The legal dispute went before a court in New York in 2010. Both sides came out of the trial looking like fools, but Wormsley and the bankers prevailed. Except an appeals court then ordered a retrial, on the basis that some specifics of English law - which governed the acquisition - had not been properly explaining in the New York courtroom.

After some back door waffling, it was agreed by both Terra Firma and Citigroup to move the dispute to the London courts, who should know a thing or two about English case law, and now, according to Bloomberg, a date has been set for that hearing. So, get this in your diaries, June, erm, 2016. It seems that it was Citigroup who asked for the court hearing to be set sometime off in the future. Perhaps they've heard something about the world ending in March that year.

Confirming the trial date, Judge Julian Flaux said: "Serious allegations of fraud are made against the defendant and against three individual bankers".

Meanwhile Citigroup said in a statement: "As demonstrated by the original verdict in New York, Citi and its bankers treated Terra Firma honestly and did nothing wrong in connection with the EMI transaction. We will continue to vigorously defend ourselves and those bankers against these baseless accusations".

And press reps for Terra Firma added: "Can't wait, we'll bring the biscuits". No, actually, they declined to comment. Spoilsports. So people, see you here in the legal spot in June 2016, and we'll get that final chapter written.

Universal Music's long-standing US distribution chief to step down
The boss of Universal Music's distribution division in the US, Jim Urie, has announced he will depart the major at the end of the year.

He's been with the company since 1998, leading what became known as Universal Music Group Distribution since 2000. He oversaw the mega-major's US distribution network during a period of considerable change in the record industry, and led a number of big initiatives along the way. He was also very vocal on the need for American legislators to do more to crack down on online music piracy, not least via the Music Rights Now initiative.

Confirming his departure from Universal in a memo to staff subsequently published by Billboard, Urie wrote: "I feel like it's time for me to make a change. Some of it is to be free to pursue the entrepreneurial opportunities that I've been eyeing. Most importantly is having the opportunity to do some of the many things that I haven't had the time to do for all of my working life".

He added: "My leaving in no way reflects on my optimism for the music business. There is no doubt that we are at a turning point that will bring us more ways to monetise our product and better marketing of our wonderful artists to a world that is hungry for what only we can give them".

Paying tribute to Urie, overall Universal boss Lucian Grainge responded: "Your expertise and commitment are remarkable. "We owe you an enormous debt of gratitude. Moreover, you have built a first-rate team. Each one of them has made an important contribution and they will continue to do great things here".

Vinyl sales could top a million this year
It's no secret whatsoever, I mean, not at all, everyone knows, even my Mum mentioned it on the phone last week, and she'd heard it from the local butcher, who'd got the lowdown from the local baker, who'd possibly heard about it from his old mucker Master Harry Styles, but the point is, everyone knows that vinyl sales are up. Well, Bob doesn't know. But that's because Bob's an idiot. I mean, he was even pleased when U2's new album arrived on his iPhone, and he doesn't even own an iPhone.

Anyway, the Entertainment Retailers Association last week confirmed that the vinyl revival continues and, while we should probably keep things in perspective (vinyl accounts for about 3% of physical album sales overall), the trade group reckons that sales of good old fashioned black discs of musical goodness could top a million this year. Vinyl sales were a quarter of that back in 2008.

Sales for 2014 were at 844,122 as good old quarter three reached its conclusion last week, which is already ahead of the total sales figure for 2013, 829,243. Says ERA boss Kim Bayley: "This is an extraordinary turnaround. Independent retailers were first to identify the untapped potential for vinyl and made it the focus of Record Store Day. With record labels now making more vinyl available, this trend shows no sign of abating".

But what are these vinyl records that the kids are all buying (mainly from Urban Outfitters apparently, though Billboard's maths says Amazon is still the biggest seller overall)? Well, here's the UK vinyl top ten for the year so far. Look at all that fabulous new music.

1. Arctic Monkeys - AM
2. Jack White - Lazaretto
3. Oasis - Definitely Maybe
4. Royal Blood - Royal Blood
5. Led Zeppelin - Led Zeppelin
6. Stone Roses - The Stone Roses
7. Led Zeppelin - Led Zeppelin III
8. Pink Floyd - The Dark Side of the Moon
9. Led Zeppelin - Led Zeppelin II
10. Arctic Monkeys - Whatever People Say I Am That's What I'm Not

Apple to push for lower subscription price point for Beats
It's no secret whatsoever, I mean, not at all, everyone knows, even my Mum mentioned it on the phone last week, and she'd heard it from the local butcher, who'd got the lowdown from the local baker, who'd possibly heard about it from his old mucker Master Harry Styles, but the point is, everyone knows that streaming music can't go fully mainstream while it's priced at ten pounds a month. Well, Bob doesn't know. But that's because Bob's an idiot. I mean, he's the guy who signed up to Rara.com. Yeah, that's right, he's the guy.

Aaaaannnyyyway, while for the music geeks that work in both the labels and the streaming start-ups, a tenner a month to access millions and millions of tracks seems like very good value indeed (and it is), most consumer research has shown that for the majority of consumers, who don't even want access to millions and millions of tracks, it's actually a bit steep. Various players in the streaming music space have been trying to work out how to revamp the business model so that there are cheaper entry points.

And that now includes Apple, according to Re/Code, who are said to be talking to the labels about new licensing deals that would enable it to offer a cheaper option when it revamps its recently acquired streaming toy Beats Music. That revamp isn't expected to occur until next year, so the five dollar Beats package isn't going to appear anytime soon, though the tech giant is already exploring all the possible options.

Of course, there are plenty of people in the labels and the artist community who reckon that $10 a month is already too cheap, so there is some work to be done to work out how a $5 a month (or even a $1 a month) service might work.

The fact that many streaming services already offer their full catalogues for free - albeit with ads - will make limited catalogue access, an obvious way to distinguish between different price points, tricky to achieve. Beats, of course, doesn't currently have a freemium option, though it is now closely aligned (behind the scenes at least) to the free-to-use ad-funded personalised radio service iTunes Radio.

  Approved: Jonnie Common
Glaswegian musician Jonnie Common released his debut album, 'Master Of None', through Red Deer Club in 2011. Having shifted over to the Song, By Toad label, he's now ready to release his latest, 'Trapped In Amber', on 31 Oct.

There are definite touches of The Books in places, particularly on 'Crumbs', but whether that's a genuine influence or not, Common's work is still very much his own. The album blends disarming humour, interesting instrumentation and solid pop tunes to create something thoroughly infectious.

The brief intro, recounting a story of telling someone they were on the guestlist for a free gig, instantly invites you into his world as a co-conspirator, rather than trying to keep you at arm's length. It makes listening to the record feel like sitting down with a friend who just happens to have written some brilliant songs.

Listen to album track 'Shark' here.
CLICK HERE to read and share online
 

Holloways guitarist Robb Skipper dies
Holloways guitarist Robb Skipper died last week, aged 28, it has been confirmed.

In a statement, Primary Talent - the band's booking agency before their split in 2011 - said: "Everybody at Primary Talent is sad to hear that Robb Skipper, former guitarist/vocalist with The Holloways, has passed away at the age of 28. Our thoughts go out to his friends and family at this difficult time".

Primary Talent's Matt Bate, who worked directly with the band throughout their career, added: "[The Holloways] were one of my first ever acts. I'm so sorry to hear the terrible news today. Robb was always a true gentleman".

Prior to his death, Skipper had been performing with new band Hares.

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Jerry Dammers comments on death of Spaceape
The Specials' Jerry Dammers has paid tribute to MC Stephen Gordon, aka The Spaceape, who died last week. News of Gordon's death was broken by the Hyperdub label, with which he was closely associated. The indie revealed that he had been suffering with a rare form of cancer for the last five years.

In a statement, Dammers, who had collaborated with Gordon in the past, said: "Stephen was not only a very pleasant and humble person, but remained incredibly brave and positive in the face of his terrible illness ... The relative lack of recognition he received in the mainstream, reflects on it, not on him, or his talent, but there were plenty of people who did understand. It was a great honour that he recorded a version of The Specials' 'Ghost Town' with Kode 9, by far and away the best version from the very very many I have been sent over the years".

Gordon also performed a number of times with Dammers' Special AKA Orchestra, including at 2008's Love Music Hate Racism festival in London's Victoria park. Of that show, Dammers said: "To me it was fitting that Stephen was the very last artist to voice at that show, carrying to some extent as he did, the Jamaican 'dub poetry' tradition, championed in the RAR era by Linton Kwesi Johnson, forward into the 'dubstep' era of recent years".

Gordon was best known for his work with Hyperdub founder Kode9, the pair working on two albums together, 2006's 'Memories Of The Future' and 2011's 'Black Sun'. He also recorded with Burial and The Bug.

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Courtney Love to star in alt-opera
Courtney Love's 'Magic School Bus'-ride of a life has careered somewhat wildly into the realm of "visionary opera-theatre", as it's been confirmed that the rock vocalist will star in a new all-singing show titled 'Kansas City Choir Boy'.

Technically, the 'opera' - a "theatricalised concept album about love altered by unexpected fate" inspired by Greek mythology - isn't really an opera at all, at least not in the conventional sense. It's rather a kind of narrative-driven musical 'in the operatic style' or, as its creator, composer Todd Almond, says, something akin to a "long-form music video for the stage", which I'd say means his choosing Love to sing it was quite logical, really.

Love, who'll play a woman living in the Midwest, who leaves her lover in order to follow 'a greater destiny', has told the New York Times she is listening to (and by implication, learning???) the score "constantly" at the moment, adding: "I'm looking to do things that are different. I wanted to do something challenging".

'Kansas City Choir Boy' is set to premiere at the NYC-based festival Prototype: Opera/Theatre/Now, which takes place next year, between 8-17 Jan. It'd be mean, inappropriate and pointless at this stage to post that video of Love singing 'Celebrity Skin' live, with her vocals and guitar isolated, as that has no relevance to the opera. None at all.

So this is the clip anyway.

Warner Australia, Marathon Artists, Glasto tickets and more

Other notable announcements and developments today...

• On Friday, Warner Music confirmed reports circulating last week that Warner Bros Australia MD Mark Poston had stepped down. He took the role in January, a year after leaving his previous record industry role as Chairman of EMI Australia.

• Label, publisher and management firm Marathon Artists has announced an alliance with Kobalt, which will see the latter's label services wing assist in the marketing and distribution of Marathon releases, while the Kobalt publishing team will provide administration and sync services for Marathon's songs catalogue. The first release under the new deal will be the debut album from We Are Shining later this month.

• Tickets for next year's Glastonbury Festival sold out in super fast time yesterday morning. The tickets went on sale at 9am, and were all gone by 1988, meaning the next edition of the popular music fest sold out in a record breaking minus 26 years. As the hipsters would say, "Wowser".

• Should you be unable or unwilling to part with £50 to get hold of the new Wu-Tang Clan album, 'A Better Tomorrow', hard coded into a portable speaker in mid-November, you'll be able to buy it via more traditional means on 2 Dec. Phew.

• David Guetta is b-b-b-back! I know how much you've missed him. His new single, 'Dangerous', out TODAY. An album will follow on 24 Nov. Here's a teaser to get you in the mood.

• Fresh from signing on with William Morris Endeavor for booking agency services and all round good times, A$AP Rocky has unveiled a new track called 'Multiply'. It features that there Juicy J.

50 Cent only wants to help you, Roland
That guy who made a couple of cool songs and picked a couple of good roles in film and television, Curtis '50 Cent' Jackson has said he'd like to be remembered as a person who helped others. Like a rap game Janet off of 'Grange Hill', you might say.

To be fair to Jackson, his 'helping people' comments were made in ref to forthcoming American reality TV show 'Dream School', which he's appearing in.

As in Jamie Oliver's British version, the series will feature 50 professionals at the top of their respective games acting as 'teachers' for children considered 'problem kids', and trying to advise them on ways they can make the most of themselves. Which is cool, like something Janet off of 'Grange Hill' might do if she was real, and not a frozen-in-time child herself.

Talking to Rolling Stone the other day, a reflective 50 said: "I started assessing my legacy and how I want people to remember me. Not as a guy who made a couple of cool songs or picked a couple of good roles in film and television, but more as someone who helped others the most".

Actually, I can only think of one film 50 Cent has been in, and that was the one where he played himself in a (not very good) movie version of his own life. Can't argue with the 'couple of cool songs' bit, though.

And this is 50 Cent's Justin Timberlake-featuring cool song 'Ayo Technology', which I for one can say has helped me through some very trying times.

 
ANDY MALT | Editor
Andy heads up the team, overseeing the CMU bulletin and website, coordinating features and interviews, reporting on artist and business stories, and contributing to the CMU Approved column.
Email andy@unlimitedmedia.co.uk (except press releases, see below)
   
CHRIS COOKE | Co-Publisher, Business Editor & Insights Director
Chris provides music business coverage, writing key business news and analysis. Chris also leads the CMU Insights training and consultancy business, and is MD of CMU publisher UnLimited Media.
Email chris@unlimitedmedia.co.uk (except press releases, see below)
   
ALY BARCHI | Staff Writer
Aly reports on artist news, coordinates the festival, gig and release round up columns, and contributes to the CMU Approved column. She also writes for CMU's sister title ThisWeek London.
Email aly@unlimitedmedia.co.uk (except press releases, see below)
   
SAM TAYLOR | Commercial Manager & Insights Associate
Sam oversees the commercial side of the CMU media, leading on sales and sponsorship, plus helps manage and deliver the CMU Insights training courses and consultancy services.
Email sam@unlimitedmedia.co.uk or call 020 7099 9060
   
CARO MOSES | Co-Publisher
Caro helps oversee the CMU media, while as a Director of UnLimited Media she heads up the company's other two titles ThisWeek London and ThreeWeeks Edinburgh, and supports other parts of the business.
Email caro@unlimitedmedia.co.uk
Send ALL press releases to musicnews@unlimitedmedia.co.uk - this is checked daily by the whole editorial team meaning your release will definitely get to the right person.

For details of the training and consultancy services offered by CMU Insights click here - Andy and Chris are also available to provide music business comment, just email them direct.

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