WEDNESDAY 15 OCTOBER 2014
TODAY'S TOP STORY: The trade body which represents Australian record shops has backed plans to make Friday the weekly release day for music the world over. Though given that records already come out on a Friday down there, it's not exactly going to inconvenience them. As previously reported, the IFPI is currently in discussions to standardise the day of the week that music is released worldwide, with Friday... [READ MORE]
 
TODAY'S APPROVED: Porches is - principally - the given alias of Aaron Maine, who is sometimes name-checked as 'Ronnie' by his long-time girlfriend, and oftimes collaborator, the also approved Frankie Cosmos, aka Greta Kline in real life and 'Frank' in her lyrics (hear details of the pair "holding hands at the bank" via Cosmos' track 'Owen'). Having, like many artists in a similar position, released split... [READ MORE]
TOP STORIES Australian Music Retailers Association supports Friday as global release day
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LEGAL Kesha and Dr Luke enter legal battle over sexual assault allegations
Ford fires back at Alliance Of Artists And Recording Companies
Industry faces new copyright data challenge following collapse of GRD
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LABELS & PUBLISHERS Warner Music Group monkeys around with executive team
Association For Electronic Music campaign highlights £100 million missing performance royalties
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BRANDS & MERCH Rihanna 'designs' scent for men
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DIGITAL & D2F SERVICES YouTube says Content ID has paid out a billion (dollars)
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MEDIA Time Out to launch new UK websites
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OBITUARIES Mark Bell 1971-2004
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ARTIST NEWS Jack White cancels tour dates after keyboardist's death
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GIGS & FESTIVALS Yes way, Cliff Richard is going on tour
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ONE LINERS IMS, Sankeys, Mykki Blanco and more
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AND FINALLY... Mastodon ensure twerking debate continues by launching twerking competition
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KOBALT LABEL SERVICES - INTERNATIONAL PRODUCT MANAGER (LONDON)
Kobalt Label Services is looking for an International Product Manager, based out of our London office. The role will involve working with the Label Services team as well as our network of International label managers, distribution partners and licensees to plan, implement and deliver successful international marketing promotion campaigns.

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THE BIG M LONDON - OPERATIONS MANAGER (LONDON)
A fast developing talent management company is seeking a operations manager to handle the day to day support of the client roster. The successful candidate will ideally have 2-3 years experience in a organisational and client focused role in the entertainment industry, preferably in the music industry; and be an organised, resourceful and social individual.

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YOUR ARMY - DJ PROMOTIONS MANAGER (LONDON)
Your Army Promotions is an industry leader working with the biggest and most credible acts in the world. Our Club Promotions Department get their music into the hands of VIP DJs. We are looking for someone with a deep understanding of dance music with preferably at least one years experience in a similar promotions role. Your role will involve researching and building relationships with taste maker club DJs, plugging for specialist radio plays and reporting back to clients.

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KEELE UNIVERSITY STUDENTS' UNION - EVENT CO-ORDINATOR (NEWCASTLE-UNDER-LYME)
We are seeking a highly motivated and experienced individual who will assist our Bars and Entertainment Manager in delivering a comprehensive programme of quality entertainment and hospitality in a well established and respected licensed venue. You will also be responsible for the marketing and promotion of events working in conjunction with our Marketing Department.

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DHP FAMILY - VENUE ASSISTANT/DUTY MANAGER, RESCUE ROOMS AND STEALTH (NOTTINGHAM)
DHP Family seeks a Venue Assistant/Duty Manager for Nottingham's Rescue Rooms and Stealth venues, to ensure the venue is operating at a safe and excellent level of service through management of venue staff and compliance procedures and to ensure the venue is operating at a profit through monitoring of controllable costs on a nightly basis.

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229 THE VENUE - ASSISTANT VENUE MANAGER (LONDON)
229, music venue in central London is looking for an Assistant Venue Manager to assist in the management and development of 229's entertainments schedule and venue operations. 229 is a multi-faceted entertainments venue with extensive technical capabilities. In the past 6 years 229 has established itself as one of London's leading mid-sized live music venues.

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DHP FAMILY - VENUE DUTY MANAGER, THE BODEGA (NOTTINGHAM)
DHP Family is seeking a Venue Duty Manager for The Bodega in Nottingham. The Bodega is a bar and live music venue playing host up-and-coming bands covering everyone from Arctic Monkeys to The xx. First opening its doors in 1999, it has since built a reputation as one of Nottingham's top alternative venues.

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DOMINO - ONLINE PR (LONDON)
Domino is looking for an experienced Online PR to join our busy in house promo team. Intuitive, strategic, diligent, brilliant applicants welcome.

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DHP FAMILY - DEPUTY GENERAL MANAGER, RESCUE ROOMS AND STEALTH (NOTTINGHAM)
DHP Family seeks a Deputy General Manager for Nottingham's Rescue Rooms and Stealth venues, to ensure the venue is operating at a safe and excellent level of service through management of venue staff and compliance procedures and to ensure the venue is operating at a profit through monitoring of controllable costs on a nightly basis.

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BIBLIOTHEQUE MUSIC - PRODUCTION MUSIC LIBRARY MANAGER (LONDON)
We are looking for an enthusiastic motivated library manager to help increase our capacity and develop new opportunities. The role will focus on marketing the catalogues to all relevant sectors of media and corporate industries, establishing and developing solid relationships, conducting searches, and taking the lead with all client-facing activity. The position has excellent career prospects going forward with scope for autonomy, innovation and growth.

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Australian Music Retailers Association supports Friday as global release day
The trade body which represents Australian record shops has backed plans to make Friday the weekly release day for music the world over. Though given that records already come out on a Friday down there, it's not exactly going to inconvenience them.

As previously reported, the IFPI is currently in discussions to standardise the day of the week that music is released worldwide, with Friday leading from the outset. However, this has not been without controversy. US indie label trade body A2IM and retailer Target have opposed moving to Friday (the release day in America is currently Tuesday, of course), while the UK's Entertainment Retailers Association says that the labels are yet to present any compelling research - or, actually, any research at all - that supports Friday as the big global sales day.

But that lack of evidence is something that the Australian Music Retailers Association is now disputing, on the grounds that Australia already changed its release day from Sunday to Friday in 2006 and it all turned out great. Like, marvellously good.

"[It] made sense for the Australian industry then and it makes sense for the global industry now", AMRA Executive Director Ian Harvey told Billboard. "The decision to move to the Friday release date in Australia was not based on numbers and empirical evidence as [ERA Director General] Kim Bayley suggests it should be, but on the belief that retailers had to meet the needs of their customers and that for those customers Friday, Saturday and Sunday are shopping days".

On concerns over the logistics and costs of making the change, he added: "We picked the smallest sales week of the year to make the change (mid/late January) and we prepared at both record company and record store level over the previous six months. No one complained, no one said there were increased costs, no one baulked at the idea because there were logistical issues and the implementation went off without a hitch".

Responding, Bayley at ERA told CMU: "We are grateful for the input of the Australian Music Retailers Association and note their statement that their decision to embrace a switch to a Friday release date was 'not based on numbers and empirical evidence' but on a 'belief' that it was a good idea. We would be very interested in any evidence that the switch to Friday in Australia has had any measurable benefits to justify that belief".

She added: "Our position remains that with music sales sharply down in 2014 we would happily agree to a switch in release dates if there was a clear benefit, but without evidence of such a benefit, it is difficult to understand why the major record companies seem so determined to pursue this move".

Kesha and Dr Luke enter legal battle over sexual assault allegations
Kesha has made a number of serious allegations against pop producer Dr Luke, real name Lukasz Gottwald, whose label and music publishing outfit she signed to aged eighteen.

The singer says Gottwald forced her to "take drugs and alcohol in order to take advantage of her sexually while she was intoxicated". The claims appear in a lawsuit filed by Kesha against Gottwald in the LA courts, which also accuses the producer of actual rape, and of creating an environment that led to the singer suffering from bulimia.

Pre-empting any questions as to why she hadn't aired these allegations earlier, the lawsuit says Kesha feared for her career if she spoke out against Gottwald, adding that "she lived in a prison of his abuse and was terrified of speaking, messaging, tweeting or doing anything at all that he might disapprove of in the event that he would later use it to torture her and her family, as he had done so many times before".

But Gottwald has quickly hit back at Kesha's litigation, denying all the allegations and arguing that her claims are part of the singer's bid to get out of her contractual commitments to him and his companies. The producer is already counter-suing, accusing Kesha and her mother of defamation, breach of contract and contractual interference.

Sky News quotes Gottwald's legal rep Christine Lepera as saying: "Kesha and her mother are engaged in a campaign of publishing outrageous and untrue statements about Dr Luke to third parties, including scurrilous and false statements of purported physical and mental abuse of Kesha. [We are confident Gottwald will] prevail in all matters, and that our client will be awarded substantial damages for this malicious conduct".

But Kesha's lawyer, Mark Geragos, countered: "This lawsuit is a wholehearted effort by Kesha to regain control of her music career and her personal freedom after suffering for ten years as a victim of mental manipulation, emotional abuse and sexual assault at the hands of Dr Luke".

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Ford fires back at Alliance Of Artists And Recording Companies
Ford has hit back in the previously reported legal battle instigated by the often forgotten (or entirely forgotten until this lawsuit) Alliance Of Artists And Recording Companies, an American organisation that exists to collect, distribute and administer royalties generated by the copying levies that are applied in some jurisdictions on products that allow users to make copies of copyright works.

In the wider scheme of things the royalties collected by the AARC are pretty modest - less than $1 million last year - but those figures would shoot up if it was successful in its legal action against both Ford and General Motors. The lawsuit argues that the car firms are in breach of America's Audio Home Recording Act for putting hard disks into its vehicles - which, amongst other things, allow users to rip music onto the disk for in-car enjoyment - without paying a levy into the music industry.

Unsurprisingly, given the AARC is looking for $2500 for every car sold with a hard disk on board, Ford has moved to have the lawsuit dismissed. According to The Hollywood Reporter, as expected the car firm is relying on a late 1990s ruling that said that MP3 players - specifically the Rio MP3 player - did not fall under the Audio Home Recording Act because it could store files other than sound recordings. That ruling greatly limited the reach of the Act, and should render it irrelevant in this case, says Ford.

The litigation does seem ambitious on the AARC's part, but it will be interesting to see how it fairs if and when the case gets to court.

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Industry faces new copyright data challenge following collapse of GRD
"What next following the collapse of the music publishing sector's Global Repertoire Database?" asks CMU Business Editor Chris Cooke in the latest edition of the CMU Digest Report.

As previously published, efforts by the music publishers to create one united database of song copyright ownership faltered earlier this year, and while the International Confederation Of Music Publishers still hopes a lite version of the project can proceed, the big publishers and collecting societies that supported GRD are currently not involved.

Outlining why copyright ownership is often complex, Cooke notes the challenges that face individuals and companies who seek to legitimately use - and pay to licence - music content. He writes: "If a licensee wants to make use of a track, they need to think about the separate copyrights in the lyrics, music and recording. All of which may be co-owned, and controlled by different entities in different territories, some for life of copyright, some for a set period of time, so owners may be different today than last year".

"And the controller may differ depending on whether you want to copy, perform, communicate or adapt the track, even though you may want to do all those things, or you may not actually know which of those applies to what you plan to do. And on top of that, someone needs to work out whether recording artists involved in the track are due any statutory royalties, and if so how they are being paid".

A central publicly-accessible copyright ownership database would greatly simplify that process and, Cooke reckons, unlock a steady stream of revenue currently being missed, while making the distribution of royalties to rights owners and creators more accurate and more cost efficient. While only involving the publishers and therefore song copyrights, the GRD was a stepping stone towards that missing database.

Aside from the commercial incentives, Cooke reckons that legislators will put only more pressure on rights owners to get their act together in this regard, ultimately with the threat of compulsory copyright registration if they fail. Though, one solution, he concludes, might simply be each rights owner publishing its ownership data, and allowing the start-up space to develop the technology that brings it all together.

The latest edition of the CMU Digest Report also considers how copyright could be better communicated, Google's role in combating piracy, and the one thing the labels could do to placate their artists. There's also an interview with the founder of innovative new ticketing app Dice.fm. You can download the PDF report for £9.99 from the CMU Shop.

CMU Digest subscribers received a link to download their copies in last week's weekly email bulletin. To receive twelve copies of the Report plus a weekly news digest and other benefits for just £50 a year, become a CMU Digest subscriber by clicking here.

Warner Music Group monkeys around with executive team
Warner Music Group has announced two changes to its senior management team. Brian Roberts is moving into the newly created role of Executive Vice President Of Corporate Strategy & Operations, and is then replaced as CFO by Eric Levin.

Roberts became WMG's CFO in January 2012, and was heavily involved in the acquisition of the Parlophone Label Group in February 2013. In his new role he will have a particular focus on Warner's artist and label services division. Levin, meanwhile, is new to Warner, having held the CFO role in a number of companies in the US and China, most recently the North Asian division of hygiene technology company Ecolab.

Commenting on the new appointments, WMG CEO Steve Cooper said: "Eric's impressive experience in global commerce and his deep understanding of local markets make him ideal for the CFO position. We are very pleased to have a finance leader of his stature step into this critical role as Brian transitions to his important new responsibilities ... These two appointments will accelerate the evolution of our worldwide infrastructure, while strengthening our ability to invest in new talent".

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Association For Electronic Music campaign highlights £100 million missing performance royalties
The Association For Electronic Music has launched a campaign to highlight the £100 million in performance royalties it reckons dance music makers are missing out on globally each year, through incomplete or missing data.

The Get Played Get Paid campaign was unveiled yesterday at the Amsterdam Dance Event. In the UK alone, AFEM estimates that PRS and PPL collect £15 million per year in royalties for public plays of dance music in clubs, on radio and elsewhere, but often this is not finding its way to the recording artists and songwriters who made it.

AFEM CEO Mark Lawrence explains: "The problem is that the money collected does not necessarily go to the right people. Part of the problem is down to writers, artists and tracks not being registered at collection societies so the organisations don't know who to pay, but even more significantly, most societies do not have accurate granular data on what is actually played in clubs. AFEM is working with the electronic music community and the collection society network in an attempt to tackle these problems head-on".

PRS itself previously recognised that many dance music creators were not registered with the collecting society system and launched the Amplify campaign to encourage them to sign up. Meanwhile, the problem of incomplete reporting into the collective licensing system from the clubbing space has been a contentious topic in the dance music community for a while.

Various companies have been attempting to address the problem with technological solutions, ie bits of kit that automatically monitor what music is played in clubs and report back to the collecting societies. Irish tech firm Future Music Audio began testing such a system, called GeoTrack ID earlier this year, while AFEM has partnered with Pioneer's KUVO system on its campaign. Pioneer is also working with Richie Hawtin's RADR.dj platform.

Ensuring that all these different technologies adopt some sort of global standard is another aim of the campaign, said Lawrence: "We want to make sure, even if a number of solutions are adopted around the world, that there is dialogue across the music industry and the value of misallocated electronic music royalties is reduced significantly".

Rihanna 'designs' scent for men
Popstar and woman Rihanna is releasing a new fragrance soon, and - imagine! - it's her first ever to be designed for men only. Rebel men. Bold men. Men who wish to smell like black pepper, herbs and lemons. It's strictly not for chickens. Though it might be nice to drizzle over an actual chicken and stick it in the oven.

'Rogue Man', as it says on the bottle, is designed to "intoxicate men with a choreographed clash of fragrance notes that are both masculine and ultra-sexy", perhaps as Rihanna's 'eau de au naturel' might do in real life. Only, for men.

So anyway, said 'notes' are a sensually vinaigrette-esque mix of "fresh citrus, herbs, and spicy black pepper" (for a "clean opening impression", obvs), "velvet floral blends, strong undertones of cedar wood, and the primal sensation of labdanum".

And if that hasn't sold it, nothing will. Bar possibly an enticing photo of Rihanna clinging onto a 'Rogue Man', which is what the sensation of wearing the fragrance will be like. Basically having Rihanna physically draped all over you. Only in a gaseous form.

Rihanna's first (and probs not last) man-cologne will, when it's available, be available online and in physical Macys shops in America. In the meantime its press release is endlessly entertaining, so have a read here.

YouTube says Content ID has paid out a billion (dollars)
Ah, YouTube. YouTube, YouTube, YouTube. I can't remember, do we still hate YouTube? Is it still screwing over indie labels everywhere? And exploiting creators for kicks? Or is it now fully focused on providing a platform for aspiring celebrity sex pests? It's so hard to keep up. But as long as it is still filling massive metal sheds with dollars and roubles so that the glassholes that run Google can keep buying big meaty pies, I guess that's all fine.

But - oh here comes a but - YouTube would like you all to know that they don't just fund the pie habits of the Google board. Oh no, any pies you find at the HQs of big content companies (and boy, visit any big content company and you'll find a lot of pies), they're courtesy of the YouTube machine too. Because the video site has now paid out over $1 billion via its Content ID system since launching the thing in 2007, according to the Financial Times.

Content ID, of course, is YouTube's proprietary rights management system which helps bigger content owners, like record companies, monitor when their content is uploaded to the video platform by third parties, either via a straight music video rip off MTV or as the soundtrack to a piece of user generated content. If and when alerted to an upload via Content ID, the rights owner can choose whether to block the video or let it stay on the site and take a cut of any ad revenue generated.

The per-play royalties for a record company on a piece of user-generated content are not as good as on an official video uploaded to its own channel. But plenty of labels nevertheless choose to monetise rather than block vids using their tunes, because providing they don't directly compete with your official pop promos, the UCG can provide extra revenue where someone else does all the work.

Basically everyone's sitting around hoping one of their tracks will become the next 'Harlem Shake' phenomenon. "Oh, when will one of our tracks become the next 'Harlem Shake' phenomenon", they all say, looking at the depleting pile of pies on their meeting room table, and tapping the YouTube control panel on their computer screen, like that will help.

"Content ID has empowered creators to remix, curate and celebrate their favourite songs and videos", YouTube's pie maker in chief Matthew Glotzbach told Billboard, "resulting in videos that are both entertaining legions of fans and rewarding rights holders with revenue".

So YouTube. It's not all fucked over indie artists and wannabe teenage misogy-stars. No, it's also an innovative UCG monetisation platform for serious content owners. Pies all round.

Time Out to launch new UK websites
Time Out is to launch new websites to serve six other British cities, in addition to London. A Manchester site launches today, while Edinburgh will follow later this month, Leeds and Glasgow in November, while Bristol and Birmingham will have to wait until early next year for their cultural listings.

Each site will have an editor (for Manchester and Leeds it has been announced that this will be freelance marketing man Rob Martin), who will source local content via an also newly launched Time Out blogger network. Local listings will be created in house at each website, while some nationally relevant content will be drawn from the existing London site.

Time Out attempted to launch a local print edition of its magazine in Manchester in 2006, following the demise, as a standalone title, of a local equivalent called City Life. That version of Time Out Manchester, however, was not a success (publishing just one issue). Since then, of course, the flagship Time Out edition in London revamped its print version as a free title, in a bid to face off new competition, both in print and online.

Like City Life in Manchester, some other regional though unaffiliated equivalents to Time Out - including Leeds Guide and Venue magazine in Bristol - have shut down in the last few years as both magazines and especially the regional press have tackled the challenges thrown up by the web. Which has possibly created new opportunities for Time Out to operate in those areas online.

Though in Scotland's Central Belt you still have both The List and younger freesheet The Skinny, both of which operate online, so there, at least, Time Out is entering a more crowded marketplace.

Mark Bell 1971-2004
As was first confirmed earlier this week, electro pioneer, Björk collaborator and long-time Warp signing Mark Bell has died of complications following an operation.

Born in West Yorkshire in 1971, the first significant phase of Bell's career was in his and Gez Varley's pioneering project LFO. The pair released their first track, also titled 'LFO', as one of the early singles on the then-nascent Warp Records in 1990, leading a wave of so-termed 'IDM' techno acts that came to define the 'intelligent' end of the 90s-era British rave scene. Their first LP 'Frequencies', which is still cited as a classic of its time, followed in 1991, and, whilst Varley left LFO after the making of 1996's 'Advance' album, Bell went on to solo-release 'Sheath' in 2003, this featuring high-profile LFO track 'Freak'.

His prolific involvement with Björk began in 1995, when he sent a cassette tape of LFO material to her, only to have her select a track that later became 'I Go Humble' - a title on her third LP 'Post'. Bell notably acted as principal producer on Björk's 1997 record 'Homogenic', staying on to watch over all the LPs she's released since then, most recently 2011's innovative app-based 'Biophilia'.

He also worked on various Björk tours, remixed tracks both for Björk and the likes of Erasure and Depeche Mode - also producing the latter's 2001 album 'Exciter' - and even appears briefly in the Michel Gondry-directed video for Björk's 2007 'Volta' single 'Declare Independence' (which stems from an instrumental he composed), floating mid-air and playing a giant loom-shaped bass guitar.

Paying tribute to Bell yesterday, Björk said via Facebook: "I love you Mark, and I feel so blessed to have made so much music with you. May your hypersensitive nature blossom fine. And wherever you're at [I] hope you've got good speakers".

  Approved: Porches
Porches is - principally - the given alias of Aaron Maine, who is sometimes name-checked as 'Ronnie' by his long-time girlfriend, and oftimes collaborator, the also approved Frankie Cosmos, aka Greta Kline in real life and 'Frank' in her lyrics (hear details of the pair "holding hands at the bank" via Cosmos' track 'Owen').

Having, like many artists in a similar position, released split singles and Bandcamp mixtapes in dribs and drabs, Maine and band reached a long-playing climax in 2013's 'Slow Dance In The Cosmos' LP, which, in case you didn't know that he and Kline are really a lot in love, will make that fact nice and clear in a pleasingly wry and realist (and most vitally, non-sickening) way.

Since scooped into the bosom of 'Brooklyn-cool'-label-nonpareil Terrible Records, Maine's taste appears to have taken a synth-pop sideroad off the 'sad rock' tone of 'Slow Dance...', with Porches' glossy new inclinations taking shape in their new AA-side single 'Prism/Forgive'.

The Kline-featuring 'Forgive', especially, is the shiniest starship in Maine et al's flotilla so far; bringing a Milky Way of 'Time After Time''-style synths to the top of the mix as his and Kline's voices dip, sway and... yeah, 'slow dance' by the light of the night sky. Okay, that IS sickening. Anyway, hear both tracks now.
CLICK HERE to read and share online
 

Jack White cancels tour dates after keyboardist's death
Jack White has cancelled a number of up coming concerts following the death of his band's keyboard player, Isaiah 'Ikey' Owens, perhaps best known as a member of The Mars Volta. Owens was found dead in his hotel room while touring with White in Mexico. White had worked with Owens since 2012, and the keyboardist appeared on both of the former White Stripe's solo albums.

A rep for White posted on his Facebook page last night: "It is with great sadness that we tell the world of the passing of the incredible musician Isaiah 'Ikey' Owens. He will be missed and loved forever by his family, friends, bandmates and fans. Ikey Owens was an astounding keyboard player in Jack White's backing band. He also played with Mars Volta, Free Moral Agents, and many other projects. Out of respect for Ikey, the remaining shows of the Jack White Tour in Mexico have been cancelled. We will all miss you Ikey. You were and are an incredible artist".

According to Consequence Of Sound, a representative for Owens has said the keyboard player died of a heart attack.

Yes way, Cliff Richard is going on tour
Perhaps over-optimistically or perhaps not, Cliff Richard has confirmed that he'll 'hit the road' next year for a series of shows celebrating his 75th birthday. Providing, of course, the police investigation into allegations of historic sexual assault doesn't escalate. Though the fact that he's announced the tour possibly implies a confidence on Cliff's part that that isn't going to happen.

Nothing so far has come to public light of the police raid on Richard's Berkshire-based property back in August, which, as previously reported, became a story in itself when it was reported that police had 'tipped off' BBC journalists ahead of the operation. The police argued that the Beeb, with pre-existing knowledge of their investigation, had forced their hand, though the Home Affairs Select Committee ruled that the Corporation had "acted perfectly properly in respect of this matter".

Either way, Richard has always strongly denied the "completely false" claims made against him and, despite being interviewed under caution by officers directly following the search on his home, has been neither arrested nor charged.

Aaaaanyway, back to those 75th b-day dates, the first of which is on 29 Sep 2015 at the Birmingham Symphony Hall. Find listings via the OFFICIAL Cliff site!

IMS, Sankeys, Mykki Blanco and more

Other notable announcements and developments today...

• Don your sailors' caps, everyone, the International Music Summit is shipping out to Singapore. Pete Tong will host IMS Asia-Pacific on 11 Dec. More details here.

• Having set up a new clubbing space in Manhattan last year, Sankeys has now decided it would much rather be over the river in Brooklyn. And so over the river to Brooklyn it is moving. "We always felt the area and aesthetics of the [Manhattan] venue was not quite right for us but we went with it", said owner David Vincent.

• Rapper Mykki Blanco has announced that he will release a new mixtape, 'Gay Dog Food', on 28 Oct. It'll feature a spoken word track by Bikini Kill's Kathleen Hanna. Here's a different track featuring Cities Aviv, called 'Moshin In The Front'.

• Mums' favourite King Creosote (well, my mum quite likes him) has announced that he'll be touring all up and down the UK like nobody's business in January and February. Just look and these dates.

• Yours and your dad's favourite band, Future Islands, will play the biggest show they've ever played on 31 Mar at the Roundhouse in London. Leap sweatily on over to this link to get tickets, which have been on sale since 9am this morning, so might be all gone. Still... leap, leap I say!

• Life-giving rock princes (and 2014 Mercury Prize nominees) Royal Blood have confirmed their highest-capacity European dates, to date, so that's gotta be a big deal. RB's forthcoming Euro tour hits the UK on 22 Feb at Glasgow's Barrowlands. Here are the dates in a list, and here is the video for Royal Blood's new single 'Ten Tonne Skeleton' because blah.

• This year's shortlist for Wales' rarest bit of awards-based acclaim, the Mercury Prize-esque Welsh Music Prize, has gone public. The latest LPs by 9 Bach, Cate Le Bon, Euros Childs, Future Of The Left, Gruff Rhys, Gulp, Joanna Gruesome, Manic Street Preachers, Samoans, Slowly Rolling Camera, The Gentle Good and The People The Poet are all nominated for the top award, which will be presented at big ole Welsh ceremony on 28 Nov. Info here.

• The ten recipients of ten European Border Breakers Awards in 2015 have been revealed, and MØ, Hozier, Todd Terje, John Newman and Tove Lowe are five of them. Those lot and the rest will receive their prizes at next year's Eurosonic Noorderslag festival. Hurrah!

Mastodon ensure twerking debate continues by launching twerking competition
A couple of weeks ago, Mastodon were defending the video for their new single, 'The Motherload', from claims that it might have been a little bit sexist.

As I'm sure you remember, the video featured Mastodon playing the song and a lot of women twerking. It was a bit confusing. And that was the point. So said drummer Brann Dailor. It was just a low budget video that was supposed to be confusing. He thought the dancing was "awesome", as a matter for fact. And he hadn't even considered that it might be seen as sexist. He hadn't even noticed that the dancers were all women. Possibly.

Anyway, definitely helping the situation and not playing up for attention, Mastodon have now launched a competition for fans to get free tickets to upcoming gigs. And all they have to do is post a photo of themselves twerking on Facebook, using the hashtag '#Asstodon'. Bonus points if you're wearing the specially made 'Asstodon' short shorts they're now selling in their online store - for THIRTY FUCKING DOLLARS.

Of course, before you cry sexism, this competition is open to men as well as women. Though you might have noted that those shorts are only available in small, large and extra large sizes. What about us mediums, huh Mastodon? What have you got against us who aren't really notable for our size, big or small? Maybe we want to twerk a bit too. (We don't.)

 
ANDY MALT | Editor
Andy heads up the team, overseeing the CMU bulletin and website, coordinating features and interviews, reporting on artist and business stories, and contributing to the CMU Approved column.
Email andy@unlimitedmedia.co.uk (except press releases, see below)
   
CHRIS COOKE | Co-Publisher, Business Editor & Insights Director
Chris provides music business coverage, writing key business news and analysis. Chris also leads the CMU Insights training and consultancy business, and is MD of CMU publisher UnLimited Media.
Email chris@unlimitedmedia.co.uk (except press releases, see below)
   
ALY BARCHI | Staff Writer
Aly reports on artist news, coordinates the festival, gig and release round up columns, and contributes to the CMU Approved column. She also writes for CMU's sister title ThisWeek London.
Email aly@unlimitedmedia.co.uk (except press releases, see below)
   
SAM TAYLOR | Commercial Manager & Insights Associate
Sam oversees the commercial side of the CMU media, leading on sales and sponsorship, plus helps manage and deliver the CMU Insights training courses and consultancy services.
Email sam@unlimitedmedia.co.uk or call 020 7099 9060
   
CARO MOSES | Co-Publisher
Caro helps oversee the CMU media, while as a Director of UnLimited Media she heads up the company's other two titles ThisWeek London and ThreeWeeks Edinburgh, and supports other parts of the business.
Email caro@unlimitedmedia.co.uk
Send ALL press releases to musicnews@unlimitedmedia.co.uk - this is checked daily by the whole editorial team meaning your release will definitely get to the right person.

For details of the training and consultancy services offered by CMU Insights click here - Andy and Chris are also available to provide music business comment, just email them direct.

To promote your company or advertise jobs or services to the entire UK music industry via the CMU bulletin or website contact Sam on 020 7099 9060 or email ads@unlimitedmedia.co.uk
© UnLimited Publishing a division of UnLimited Media

CMU, Fl2 Unicorn House, 221 Shoreditch High Street, London, E1 6PJ.
t: 020 7099 9050 (editorial) 020 7099 9060 (sales)

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