THURSDAY 16 OCTOBER 2014
TODAY'S TOP STORY: The recent court win for songwriters Flo & Eddie in their royalties dispute with US satellite radio firm Sirius XM has had an impact on a very similar case being pursued by the record companies. As much previously reported, there is some dispute over whether or not American online and satellite radio services are obliged to pay royalties to record companies for recordings they play that... [READ MORE]
 
TODAY'S APPROVED: You probably think you've got Mr Oizo pegged. Whether you only know him from 'Flat Beat', or you've kept at least a cursory glance on his career since that yellow puppet invaded our lives, you're going to have a pretty firm view. But stop now. Stop and try to forget who Mr Oizo is to you. He's now signed to Brainfeeder and will release his first album for three years on 17 Nov... [READ MORE]
TOP STORIES Labels look set to win pre-1972 lawsuit against Sirius after Flo & Eddie ruling
JUMP | ONLINE
LEGAL Dancing Jesus file-sharer changes plea to guilty
JUMP | ONLINE
LABELS & PUBLISHERS "End the NDA cult", managers tell the labels
JUMP | ONLINE
LIVE BUSINESS Bloc Weekend to return in 2015, founders discuss rebuilding the festival
Glastonbury asks traders to 'hold off' on sale of Native American-style headwear
JUMP | ONLINE
MARKETING & PR New digital promo platform launches
JUMP | ONLINE
DIGITAL & D2F SERVICES Bandcamp launches artist subscription option with Candy Says
JUMP | ONLINE
ARTIST NEWS Bono apologises for forcing album on iTunes users (with doubtable sincerity)
Snoop apologises over Iggy row (with doubtable sincerity)
JUMP | ONLINE
ONE LINERS Nick Cave And The Bad Seeds, Scott Walker, Meghan Trainor and more
JUMP | ONLINE
AND FINALLY... Slipknot camel shit stink fest hits a snag
JUMP | ONLINE
 
Click JUMP to skip direct to a section of this email or ONLINE to read and share stories on the CMU website (JUMP option may not work in all email readers). For regular updates from Team CMU follow us on Twitter, Facebook or Tumblr.
 
 
BE BETTER AT THE BUSINESS OF MUSIC
A series of evening seminars providing a complete overview of the music business in 2014 - covering all key revenue streams, music rights in detail, music PR and social media, direct-to-fan and artist deals.

For more information and to book on to individual seminars or the whole programme click here.
   
KOBALT LABEL SERVICES - INTERNATIONAL PRODUCT MANAGER (LONDON)
Kobalt Label Services is looking for an International Product Manager, based out of our London office. The role will involve working with the Label Services team as well as our network of International label managers, distribution partners and licensees to plan, implement and deliver successful international marketing promotion campaigns.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
THE BIG M LONDON - OPERATIONS MANAGER (LONDON)
A fast developing talent management company is seeking a operations manager to handle the day to day support of the client roster. The successful candidate will ideally have 2-3 years experience in a organisational and client focused role in the entertainment industry, preferably in the music industry; and be an organised, resourceful and social individual.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
YOUR ARMY - DJ PROMOTIONS MANAGER (LONDON)
Your Army Promotions is an industry leader working with the biggest and most credible acts in the world. Our Club Promotions Department get their music into the hands of VIP DJs. We are looking for someone with a deep understanding of dance music with preferably at least one years experience in a similar promotions role. Your role will involve researching and building relationships with taste maker club DJs, plugging for specialist radio plays and reporting back to clients.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
KEELE UNIVERSITY STUDENTS' UNION - EVENT CO-ORDINATOR (NEWCASTLE-UNDER-LYME)
We are seeking a highly motivated and experienced individual who will assist our Bars and Entertainment Manager in delivering a comprehensive programme of quality entertainment and hospitality in a well established and respected licensed venue. You will also be responsible for the marketing and promotion of events working in conjunction with our Marketing Department.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
DHP FAMILY - VENUE ASSISTANT/DUTY MANAGER, RESCUE ROOMS AND STEALTH (NOTTINGHAM)
DHP Family seeks a Venue Assistant/Duty Manager for Nottingham's Rescue Rooms and Stealth venues, to ensure the venue is operating at a safe and excellent level of service through management of venue staff and compliance procedures and to ensure the venue is operating at a profit through monitoring of controllable costs on a nightly basis.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
229 THE VENUE - ASSISTANT VENUE MANAGER (LONDON)
229, music venue in central London is looking for an Assistant Venue Manager to assist in the management and development of 229's entertainments schedule and venue operations. 229 is a multi-faceted entertainments venue with extensive technical capabilities. In the past 6 years 229 has established itself as one of London's leading mid-sized live music venues.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
DHP FAMILY - VENUE DUTY MANAGER, THE BODEGA (NOTTINGHAM)
DHP Family is seeking a Venue Duty Manager for The Bodega in Nottingham. The Bodega is a bar and live music venue playing host up-and-coming bands covering everyone from Arctic Monkeys to The xx. First opening its doors in 1999, it has since built a reputation as one of Nottingham's top alternative venues.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
DOMINO - ONLINE PR (LONDON)
Domino is looking for an experienced Online PR to join our busy in house promo team. Intuitive, strategic, diligent, brilliant applicants welcome.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
DHP FAMILY - DEPUTY GENERAL MANAGER, RESCUE ROOMS AND STEALTH (NOTTINGHAM)
DHP Family seeks a Deputy General Manager for Nottingham's Rescue Rooms and Stealth venues, to ensure the venue is operating at a safe and excellent level of service through management of venue staff and compliance procedures and to ensure the venue is operating at a profit through monitoring of controllable costs on a nightly basis.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
BIBLIOTHEQUE MUSIC - PRODUCTION MUSIC LIBRARY MANAGER (LONDON)
We are looking for an enthusiastic motivated library manager to help increase our capacity and develop new opportunities. The role will focus on marketing the catalogues to all relevant sectors of media and corporate industries, establishing and developing solid relationships, conducting searches, and taking the lead with all client-facing activity. The position has excellent career prospects going forward with scope for autonomy, innovation and growth.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
 
CMU Jobs is a proven way to recruit the best music business talent for roles across the industry at all levels, from graduate to senior management. To book an ad contact Sam on 020 7099 9060 or email ads@unlimitedmedia.co.uk
 
 

Labels look set to win pre-1972 lawsuit against Sirius after Flo & Eddie ruling
The recent court win for songwriters Flo & Eddie in their royalties dispute with US satellite radio firm Sirius XM has had an impact on a very similar case being pursued by the record companies.

As much previously reported, there is some dispute over whether or not American online and satellite radio services are obliged to pay royalties to record companies for recordings they play that pre-date 1972. The date is significant because US-wide federal law - that says such services do have to pay royalties - only specifically applies to recordings made since 1972. Tracks recorded prior to then are protected by state-level copyright laws.

Sirius and others have therefore assumed that that means they can play recordings from before 1972, including the all important 1950s and 1960s rock n roll catalogue, without paying royalties to the labels. Needless to say, the record industry does not approve.

It has led to some debate over whether or not some principles of federal copyright law should apply to all recordings, to avoid extra complexities in the copyright system. Though the labels' legal action on the matter has more focused on the argument that state law also requires royalties to be paid.

That argument needs to be considered on a state-by-state level, of course. Various lawsuits have been filed, with both Flo & Eddie, previously of the band The Turtles, and the major record companies filing some litigation in California. In their case, the labels urged the judge to provide instruction to any jury to the effect that Californian law should indeed be interpreted as putting a royalty obligation on companies like Sirius.

It was an ambitious request that would have pretty much settled that court battle before it had even started, so it wasn't surprising when, in August, judge Mary Strobel said she was hesitant of granting the labels their wish in terms of the jury instructions. But then Flo & Eddie won in their legal battle, and Strobel now seems pretty convinced by the judgement made in that case, even though she's not obliged to follow the ruling in her courtroom.

According to The Hollywood Reporter, Strobel's analysis of the Flo & Eddie case throws some more light on that ruling. The crucial piece of Californian copyright law, dating from 1982, makes no specific reference to public performance rights - the element of the copyright that usually covers broadcasters - hence the confusion over whether or not public performance is in fact an 'act restricted by the copyright'.

Sirius would argue that, because that bit of law doesn't specifically give the labels an exclusive public performance right, it has no such right, and therefore no royalty is due. But the judge in the Flo & Eddie case points out that the law in question does exclude a different element of the copyright (relating to cover versions), leading to the conclusion that if that rule did not intend the labels to have a public performance right it would have explicitly said so.

And Strobel now seems to share that viewpoint, in doing so making it very likely the labels will win its litigation against Sirius too. Strobel wrote: "As the district court found significant, this court finds significant that the California legislature specifically adopted one exception ... but did not specifically adopt the other exception found in that law for public performance rights. The court concludes that the exclusive ownership right in pre-1972 recordings includes a public performance right, as not specifically excluded".

Federal copyright law is explicit that while there is a public performance right for lyrics and musical score, it doesn't extend to sound recordings unless the performance is "by means of a digital audio transmission" (ie satellite or online). Because of that labels haven't generally collected public performance royalties in the US.

Of course, the Flo & Eddie ruling is basically saying that, in California at least, they could collect that royalty for pre-1972 recordings. But they haven't, mainly because until recently public performance royalties were very much a side income for the labels, who were primarily in the business of selling records. This means that, even if Sirius has to accept an unfavourable (to the broadcaster) interpretation of Californian law in both the Flo & Eddie and labels case, they are bound to ask, 'Well, why haven't the labels been collecting these royalties from everyone else since 1982?'

So, basically, things are looking good for the labels in this one, though there is likely plenty of lively debate on the issue still to come.

Dancing Jesus file-sharer changes plea to guilty
Both the men prosecuted for infringing copyright via one-time file-sharing forum Dancing Jesus have now pleaded guilty to illegally distributing music, according to record industry trade body the BPI, which instigated the private prosecution.

As previously reported, the UK-based site - where users shared links to unlicensed music content, including pre-release tracks - was taken offline in 2011 after US Homeland Security seized the server on which it was hosted. According to reports at the time, City Of London Police arrested both the site's administrator and one of its most prolific uploaders, known as Trix, though it was the BPI's private prosecution that took the matter to Newcastle Crown Court.

The site's operator, Kane Robinson, had already pleaded guilty to copyright infringement before the trial began, while the second defendant, Richard Graham, who initially disputed the charges against him, changed his plea at the outset of the hearing, seemingly after seeing the evidence stacked up against him.

Commenting on the case, the boss of the BPI's Copyright Protection Unit, David Wood, told reporters this morning: "This case is significant. The guilty verdict confirms that posting illegal online links to music is a criminal offence which economically harms musicians and the labels that support them. Pre-release piracy, in particular, robs musicians of artistic control, leaving them with no say in when and how their music - which has taken blood, sweat and tears to produce - is released".

On the specifics of the investigation that led to the guilty pleas, Wood added: "In a first-of-its-kind operation, the collaboration of UK enforcement bodies and the US authorities shows that the protection of intellectual property is a global issue that can and will be dealt with across borders. I'd like to thank the City Of London Police, Leicestershire Police and the US Department of Homeland Security for their commitment to this investigation and professionalism shown throughout the case".

Robinson and Graham will now be sentenced on 10 Nov.

"End the NDA cult", managers tell the labels
The relationship between artists and labels is in flux, we know that. And whereas there was once talk of artists cutting the big bad labels out of their business affairs entirely, in most cases, especially with new talent, labels are now actually involved in more elements of an act's career. There are plenty of opportunities in these new style artist/label alliances, though trust issues remain, not least because of the secrecy that surrounds the deals rights owners are doing with the digital service providers.

Providing clarity on those digital deals, says CMU Business Editor Chris Cooke in the latest CMU Digest Report, is the single biggest thing the labels could do to placate artists in 2014. Cooke writes: "As CMU's survey of the UK artist community earlier this year proved, while some high profile popstars are outwardly hostile to the rise of streaming music and some of the key players in the market, most music-makers think streaming is the future, and while that's probably fine, they are just really, really confused about how royalties are paid. Their managers may know a little more, though much confusion remains across the board. And where there's confusion in the music industry, artists and managers will assume something dodgy is going on".

Volker May, Vice Chair of the International Music Managers Forum agrees. Indeed his organisation published a short paper at the recent Reeperbahn conference on this very issue, in particular seeking clarity on the kickbacks and equity the labels enjoy when signing up with new digital services. The IMMF's statement following the indie label community's recent Fair Deal Declaration, which pledged more clarity on digital issues, and which was a welcome development for May, though he wants to see labels make good on that promise.

He told CMU: "We like labels, indie and major. There are a lot of good people at labels, and a lot of resources are invested by labels in artists. [But we need] to draw attention to the fact that transparency failures are failures of action not of sentiment. Broad statements of good intentions are only valuable if backed up with actions, otherwise they are meaningless. We haven't issued a declaration of what we think should be done with the [label's] side payments and equity deals, we are simply asking for the artists' partners at labels and at publishers to respond by acting to bring transparency on specific issues".

Labels and DSPs are prone to shout 'NDA' whenever asked about the nitty gritty of the label/digital deals, and ending the non-disclosure agreement obsession that has dominated most of the big digital agreements in recent years is one of the artist and management community's top priorities.

Says May: "Regardless of who started the NDA cult, the artist signs a deal with the labels and the publishers. A starting point would be for them to recognise the trust and commitment made by artists, and to reciprocate. Not to point across the table at the services as a problem that somehow prevents us equitably dividing the money on our side. Lets deal collectively with the value of music as an industry, lets go and get more money, but first lets agree that the value will be shared, and what sharing actually involves".

The latest edition of the CMU Digest Report also considers copyright ownership data challenges, how copyright could be better communicated and Google's role in combating piracy. There's also an interview with the founder of innovative new ticketing app Dice.fm. You can download the PDF report for £9.99 from the CMU Shop.

CMU Digest subscribers received a link to download their copies in last week's weekly email bulletin. To receive twelve copies of the Report plus a weekly news digest and other benefits for just £50 a year, become a CMU Digest subscriber by clicking here.

Bloc Weekend to return in 2015, founders discuss rebuilding the festival
The Bloc Weekend festival has announced its return to Butlins in Minehead next year, three years on from the ill-fated London version of the event. Taking place in March, the first wave of artists have been announced - including Jeff Mills, Modeselektor and Hudson Mohawke - with the festival returning to the holiday camp format it previously ran successfully for a number of years.

As you may remember, Bloc's 2012 event in London was shut down by police mid-way through its first night due to overcrowding at the London Pleasure Gardens complex where it was taking place. People seemingly managing to gain entry without tickets exacerbated existing problems caused by the Pleasure Gardens site not been completed on schedule and therefore not being fully ready to receive visitors. The complex was put into administration just weeks after the Bloc cancellation as other promoters lost confidence in it.

The debacle forced the company behind Bloc into administration too, though its founders returned less than a year later with a series of parties, and opened a permanent venue in East London.

And on 13-15 Mar next year, founders Alex Benson and George Hull will relaunch the Bloc festival, back at the site it previously occupied from 2009 to 2011. So far confirmed to play are Jeff Mills, Ben Klock, Marcel Dettmann, Modeselektor, ESG, Carl Craig, Hudson Mohawke, Jackmaster, Omar S, Robert Hood, Karenn, Hessle Audio, and Moritz Von Oswald Trio.

Discussing the process of rebuilding Bloc back up to a large-scale event, Benson told CMU: "We had to restore ourselves personally and professionally. We built a venue in an ex-furniture factory, got a permanent licence and the correct planning permission, and processed over a thousand people on a busy weekend. We then relaunched Bloc as an internal promotion at that venue last year, rebuilding all of our relationships and starting to consistently sell it out. That operation, coupled with our past history delivering weekenders, restored a lot of confidence".

"The actual reasons for the failure of the [London] event were well known in the industry", he added, talking about the support his company has received from fans and the music business over the last two years. "We have found many people we worked with in the past to be very sympathetic, especially given our history prior to the London event. We weren't the only organisation to be badly burned by the whole thing - but we were perhaps the most high profile".

Throughout all of this, it's notable that Bloc has remained independent. With a brand strong enough to survive what happened in London, and large companies currently in acquisition mode in the dance festival market, there must have been a temptation to try to partner with an SFX or Live Nation.

"Yes, we considered everything that could possibly bring Bloc back to its previous position, and have talked seriously about these kind of deals many times before", he agreed. "But it's not like you're walking down the street and Live Nation are driving behind you slowly calling out the window, 'C'mere you little festival, we want to gobble you up...' To make it work for everyone you have to both want a deal, and sometimes the situation just isn't right".

And, he continued: "Being independent is great because it makes you more agile and responsive. We feel like we know the people who go to Bloc better than anyone and not having any buffer between us and them helps us reach them better".

Asked what he and Hull had learned from the fall out of the 2012 event, Benson concluded: "To choose your partners very, very carefully. And that Butlins is an organisation you can depend on".

More information and tickets for the 2015 event are available at blocweekend.com

Here's a short video to set the mood

--------------------------------------------------

Glastonbury asks traders to 'hold off' on sale of Native American-style headwear
The proprietors of on-site shops at the Glastonbury Festival have been asked nicely not to sell anymore Native American-style headdresses (kind of like the one Pharrell wore on that cover of Elle magazine, and later apologised for). Speaking to NME yesterday, Glasto co-organiser Emily Eavis emphasised that "it isn't a ban, it's just that we've asked the two traders selling them to hold off".

This mirrors a similar, far more strict prohibitory move by Canada's Bass Coast festival earlier this year, which as well as veto-ing its on-site shops from selling items of feathered headgear, also asked ticketholders to refrain from bringing in and wearing the garments.

The far less severe decision over at Glasto - which presumably doesn't cover individuals who want to carry in and sport the 'hats' for their own potentially-racially-insensitive pleasure - follows the launch of an online petition on Change.org calling on Emily Eavis et al to "lead the way this side of the pond and take a principled stand". It only attracted 65 signatures but I guess the saying is true, that from little acorns mighty oaks do grow.

"Our petition, small in numbers but passionate in support, pushed this issue right up to Emily Eavis, and she listened", confirms the campaign's creator Daniel Round, adding: "Although it is only one UK festival, I hope that if we spread the news of Glastonbury's decision online, positive discussions about the stereotyping of Native Americans and the headdress will grow in the UK and elsewhere".

New digital promo platform launches
Ah, promo track delivery systems. There's been a few of them, hasn't there? As the music industry has slowly moved away from throwing CDs into jiffy bags at DJs, journalists and other opinion forming types in favour of doing the pre-release promo thing digitally.

Sending CDs in jiffy bags was bad for the environment, the cost-cutting labels told us, somewhat unconvincingly, hence the shift to digital promos. Though for many media people, opening hundreds of jiffys each month was no more fun than it was for the PRs to stuff the envelopes in the first place, so DJs and journos weren't entirely opposed to receiving pre-release preview content in digital form. Even if it meant giving up that traditional little cash-boost that came from flogging your promos to the record sellers of Berwick Street (though as a responsible journalist, obviously I don't even know what that means).

The only problem was that most of the digital promo systems employed by the labels were God awful, clearly designed to serve the needs of the PR team, and the PR team alone. Indeed, it often felt like no one involved in designing these platforms had ever actually spoken to a journalist. Even to this day the sinister words "Play MPE" will result in a short-sharp gasp of horror from anyone who regularly reviews new music.

Anyway, although things have improved slightly over the years, Belfast-based Inflyte reckons that no one has got it totally right yet, and so it is launching a new music promo system all of its own. Promos can be sent to a media contact's mobile phone where it can me cached, listened to offline, and on any device, making the whole thing, and I quote, "much more lifestyle compatible". Whatever the hell that means.

The new platform has been conceived by former BBC presenter Paul Hammil and technology developer Paul McConnon, with consultancy from Darren Hemmings off of digital marketing consultancy Motive Unknown, so at least we know this one has had input from people on both sides of the label-to-media equation.

For the label or PR agency there's plenty of extra tools too, including one-click feedback, because those PRs love getting feedback direct from their contacts (anyone would think they didn't actually read the mags or listen to the radio shows they service).

Commenting on the Inflyte system, Hammil told reporters: "As a radio presenter and DJ I was becoming increasingly frustrated at the inefficiency of sending and receiving promotional music. Inflyte was borne out of that frustration and we have, as a result, developed a platform that is much more flexible and lifestyle friendly. By allowing recipients to store and listen to music when it suits them and by enabling them to give timely, detailed feedback on the go, Inflyte is making the process of listening and responding to promos much more enjoyable and productive".

Bandcamp launches artist subscription option with Candy Says
CMU Approved indie pop duo Candy Says have become the first act to make use of Bandcamp's new subscription option. Fans are now able to pay £20 per year to receive all of the band's releases, plus exclusive subscriber-only content.

In a blog post announcing the news, the duo said that in the past they've shied away from crowdfunding because "the 'pledge' always seems like an expensive pre-order, and the band gets more out of it than the pledger ... And as a band, once you've run a campaign like that you've exhausted the goodwill of your audience and you're back at square one - you have to run another one if you want to make another record".

But this feels different they said, continuing: "We would subscribe to our favourite bands if we could. We would happily send them a bit of money once a year, knowing that they would make music we love and send it to us. So that's what we're doing with Bandcamp".

Find out more and subscribe to Candy Says for £20 a year here.

  Approved: Mr Oizo - Bear Biscuit
You probably think you've got Mr Oizo pegged. Whether you only know him from 'Flat Beat', or you've kept at least a cursory glance on his career since that yellow puppet invaded our lives, you're going to have a pretty firm view. But stop now. Stop and try to forget who Mr Oizo is to you.

He's now signed to Brainfeeder and will release his first album for three years on 17 Nov. Called 'The Church', the first track from that album, 'Machyne', hit the internet at the tail end of last month. It contains Oizo-esque elements but ramps them all up to harder (you might say more annoying) levels.

But this was just a stepping stone on the way to 'Bear Biscuit', a track that manages to be aggressively whimsical. Or whimsically aggressive. Maybe just aggressive. It's loud, abrasive and prone to making sharp turns when you really hadn't asked it to.

It is not, I think it's fair to say, anything like what you'd have previously described to someone asking what Mr Oizo sounds like. But, blimey, I hope there are more like it.
CLICK HERE to read and share online
 

Bono apologises for forcing album on iTunes users (with doubtable sincerity)
U2 did a Facebook video Q&A earlier this week, in which they spent five minutes answering stupid questions from fans. #engagement #content

Amongst the stupid questions was this one: "Can you please never release an album on iTunes that automatically downloads to peoples' playlists ever again? It's really rude".

Applying heavy sarcasm, Bono responded: "Oops... I'm sorry about that. I had this beautiful idea. [We] might have got carried away with ourselves. Artists are prone to that kind of thing. A drop of megalomania. A touch of generosity. A dash of self-promotion. And deep fear that these songs that we've poured our life into over the last few years mightn't be heard. There's a lot of noise out there. I guess we got a little noisy ourselves to get through it".

The album in question, 'Songs Of Innocence', was of course released as a freebie through iTunes, much to the dismay of many who found it suddenly appearing on the phones and computers. Apple was forced to release an app that fully deleted the files, the only option previously being to hide them, which wasn't enough for some people.

That promotion now over, the album is available to acquire via direct financial transaction this week.

--------------------------------------------------

Snoop apologises Iggy over Iggy row (with doubtable sincerity)
An online 'row' of sorts between Snoop Dogg and Iggy Azalea has been going on this week, and hey, it kind of still is. Great.

It aaaaallll started with Snoop - whose main complaints re Iggy are that she's white, female and raps (occasionally all at the same time) - dissing Azalea via a 'basic' and pretty racist/sexist meme on Instagram. I should say that Snoop, as his Insta-feed will testify, does love a good meme, and quite a lot of bad and deliberately distasteful ones too, and that initial one involving Iggy was only a drop in an ocean of memes.

Inevitably, Iggy wasn't so fond of the one dedicated to her, and replied in a series of since-erased tweets (saved by XXL) to the effect that, since she and Snoop had met in the past and been amicable, she felt "disappointed that [he'd] be such an ass for no reason".

There's been a lot of 'developing hip hop beef'-themed press since that first to-and-fro; and many, many more anti-Iggy Insta-jabs from Snoop, who is basically revelling in the whole thing, even going to these highly-questionable lengths.

It's all kind of silly, really, and certainly symptomatic of a feeling within certain camps that, as a white Australian 'chick' with a highly-sexualised image, an American rap accent and what's best described as a very 'lite' and poppy best-selling LP in 'The New Classic', Azalea is some kind of hip hop interloper to be picked on and maybe, prised off the scene altogether. And Snoop, who isn't exactly famed for his earnest demeanour (ie he's done some pretty silly and 'lite' things himself - a list-and-a-half), nor strident and enlightened feminist views, is only the latest in a long line to do the picking.

And pointing finally to misogyny, which is perhaps at the heart of people like Snoop's real gripe with all female rappers/female humans, whether they choose to realise it or not, let's end this long and winding road to nowhere with a 'POV of the day' from Pitchfork / Complex / Billboard / Fader / everything writer Craig Jenkins, who says: "It's easy to say what Snoop did was wrong because he crossed a line. Tougher to think about all the shit that DOESN'T bother us that should".

So please all go away and think, for God's sake. Though following some of the thinking I've just done about it all, Snoop posted a new video announcing that the beef with Iggy is now "officially over". In fact, he claims, there will be "no more bad talk" and that he's sorry. So it can work, see?

That said, I'm not really sure quite how sincere one can be in a fifteen second Instagram video. Especially while smirking like that.

Nick Cave And The Bad Seeds, Scott Walker, Meghan Trainor and more

Other notable announcements and developments today...

• Fourteen historic(al) Nick Cave And The Bad Seeds LPs are going to be released on heavyweight vinyl for the first time; the first seven in the remainder of this year, and the next seven next year. Starting off the programme on 27 Oct are 1984's 'From Her To Eternity', 1985's 'The Firstborn Is Dead', and 1986's 'Your Funeral... My Trial'. Rich Nick Cave fans can place their orders in advance here.

• Highbrow pop bizarro Scott Walker is going to write the score for 'The Childhood Leader', a far-off film about "the rise of facism in the 20th Century" starring Robert Pattinson, Stacey Martin and Tim Roth. Watch this intriguing space.

• Bonobo has an EP on the way (on 1 Dec) featuring three all-new tracks, ie not ones off his last LP 'The North Borders'. Hear the leading one, 'Flashlight', via this link.

• American band Viet Cong, an offshoot of very good American band Women, are all set to release their self-titled first LP (via a new deal with Jagjaguar) on 19 Jan 2015. Hear one of its tracks, 'Continental Shelf', here, and check the listings for VC's 2015 UK tour here.

• Virgin-signed-band-on-the-rise Vaults are playing some shows next month (between 20-28 Nov here in Britain) behind their new EP 'Vultures'. Tickets via entervaults.com

• Normal-sized popstar Meghan Trainor has given MTV a stream of her new single 'Lips Are Movin'. And another thing. Justin Bieber has 'climbed on' a new Maejor remix of Trainor's 'All About That Bass', because Justin is also all about that bass. Sometimes I hate this world.

Slipknot camel shit stink fest hits a snag
Slipknot's plan to make the site of their upcoming Knotfest festival in California stink of camel excrement has hit a snag. Local authorities have told the band that the method that they've come up with for disseminating the poo smell is no good. Illegal, in fact.

Excitedly explaining the idea earlier this month, Shaun Crahan of the band told Rolling Stone that the plan was to ensure that the festival - and therefore the band - had a distinct smell, which would stay in fans' memories for them to revisit in their minds at a later date. They'd always be transported back to that time when they had a ton of fun in a field. Or at least that time they couldn't get the smell of camel crap out of their clothes.

"You can't huff it, but it's got this smell", explained Crahan. "And it's not necessarily the most comfortable thing, but it's not necessarily the worst thing".

The plan had apparently been to mix the shit with oil and then burn it in big metal drums. But under Californian law, burning oil (regardless of whether it's in a big metal drum and/or mixed with camel poop) is against the law. Also, those pesky authorities thought that intentionally making a large area smell bad might be a public nuisance.

The dream isn't dead just yet though. According to TMZ, the band are exploring alternative ways to disperse that dromedary butt smell.

 
ANDY MALT | Editor
Andy heads up the team, overseeing the CMU bulletin and website, coordinating features and interviews, reporting on artist and business stories, and contributing to the CMU Approved column.
Email andy@unlimitedmedia.co.uk (except press releases, see below)
   
CHRIS COOKE | Co-Publisher, Business Editor & Insights Director
Chris provides music business coverage, writing key business news and analysis. Chris also leads the CMU Insights training and consultancy business, and is MD of CMU publisher UnLimited Media.
Email chris@unlimitedmedia.co.uk (except press releases, see below)
   
ALY BARCHI | Staff Writer
Aly reports on artist news, coordinates the festival, gig and release round up columns, and contributes to the CMU Approved column. She also writes for CMU's sister title ThisWeek London.
Email aly@unlimitedmedia.co.uk (except press releases, see below)
   
SAM TAYLOR | Commercial Manager & Insights Associate
Sam oversees the commercial side of the CMU media, leading on sales and sponsorship, plus helps manage and deliver the CMU Insights training courses and consultancy services.
Email sam@unlimitedmedia.co.uk or call 020 7099 9060
   
CARO MOSES | Co-Publisher
Caro helps oversee the CMU media, while as a Director of UnLimited Media she heads up the company's other two titles ThisWeek London and ThreeWeeks Edinburgh, and supports other parts of the business.
Email caro@unlimitedmedia.co.uk
Send ALL press releases to musicnews@unlimitedmedia.co.uk - this is checked daily by the whole editorial team meaning your release will definitely get to the right person.

For details of the training and consultancy services offered by CMU Insights click here - Andy and Chris are also available to provide music business comment, just email them direct.

To promote your company or advertise jobs or services to the entire UK music industry via the CMU bulletin or website contact Sam on 020 7099 9060 or email ads@unlimitedmedia.co.uk
© UnLimited Publishing a division of UnLimited Media

CMU, Fl2 Unicorn House, 221 Shoreditch High Street, London, E1 6PJ.
t: 020 7099 9050 (editorial) 020 7099 9060 (sales)

publishing@unlimitedmedia.co.uk | complaints@unlimitedmedia.co.uk