FRIDAY 5 DECEMBER 2014
TODAY'S TOP STORY: Organisers of Manchester's Parklife Festival have been fined £70,000 after they sent out a promotional text message ahead of this year's event which was set to appear on the recipient's phone as if it had come from 'Mum'. Promoting a series of post-festival club nights, the text read: "Some of the Parklife after parties have already sold out. If your going, make sure your home for breakfast... [READ MORE]
 
TODAY'S APPROVED: The Hydra and Ninja Tune take over East London's Studio Spaces E1 tomorrow night, with a pretty phenomenal line-up. Ready to provide a mix of live and DJ sets are Lee Bannon, my man to watch FaltyDL, Bonobo, The Bug, Illum Sphere, Actress, Machinedrum and the rather excellent Dutch beatster Martyn. The collection of big names and relatively short set times make this more... [READ MORE]
   
BEEF OF THE WEEK: Two years ago, Universal International CEO Max Hole said that classical music needed to overcome its "perceived elitism" and ditch its "unwritten etiquette" in order to convince more people to experience live performances. "I am worried that the very traditions and institutions that seek to celebrate, promote and preserve classical music are in danger of causing the genre great... [READ MORE]
TOP STORIES Parklife Festival fined £70,000 over Mum text
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LEGAL iTunes chief blames labels for Apple removing download rivals from the iPod
Phil Rudd back in court over scrap with 'witness'
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LIVE BUSINESS Ethical ticket exchange Scarlet Mist closes down
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MEDIA Leona and Lily arrive in PPL's top Christmas songs list
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EDUCATION & EVENTS CMU:DIY to return to The Roundhouse this weekend
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INDUSTRY PEOPLE Music exec walks 60 mile commute to raise awareness for campaign against female genital mutilation
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OBITUARIES Ian McLagan 1945-2014
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ARTIST NEWS Nick 'Gravenhurst' Talbot dies
The Script rescue woman from motorway crash
Andre 3000 bemoans 'sell out' Outkast reunion
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ONE LINERS Olly Murs, Future Brown, Mikky Ekko, and, oh, you know...
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AND FINALLY... CMU Beef Of The Week #234: Classical Music v Its Audience
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Click JUMP to skip direct to a section of this email or ONLINE to read and share stories on the CMU website (JUMP option may not work in all email readers). For regular updates from Team CMU follow us on Twitter, Facebook or Tumblr.
 
 
OFFICE SPACE AVAILABLE
Office space to rent with Full Time Hobby and SALT Films. Music and film companies looking for another likeminded company to share a new office space at Tileyard Studios. £400 per desk including most bills (phone separate). For full information click here.
 
For information on placing classified ads in the CMU Daily contact Sam on 020 7099 9060 or email ads@unlimitedmedia.co.uk
 
 
HOUSE OF 27 - SOCIAL MEDIA & DIGITAL MARKETING MANAGER (LONDON)
House Of 27 is looking for an experienced Social Media & Digital Marketing Manager to join their team. You will be responsible for the day to day social media activity for artists and music brands; creative content creation, copywriting, influencer outreach, content flow management, community engagement and fan growth. You will be working alongside external partners to amplify artists' social media presence and relevance.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
WFS COMMS - JUNIOR MUSIC PUBLICIST (LONDON)
Worldwide Friendly Society Communications is looking for a junior publicist. Ideally with one or two years experience, you will have delivered complete album campaigns across print and digital music media with attention to detail, determination and panache.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
THE ORCHARD - MARKETING COORDINATOR PAID INTERNSHIP (LONDON)
The Orchard has an opening for a marketing coordinator on a twelve month paid internship basis. This is a pivotal support role for our UK and European retail and interactive marketing teams. The position sits within the marketing department that is comprised of two branches - retail marketing and interactive marketing.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
GRECO-ROMAN - LABEL MANAGER (LONDON)
Greco-Roman is an independent record label based in London specialising in left of field electronic popular music, releasing singles from Lxury, Roosevelt, Joe Goddard, Disclosure, Totally Enormous Extinct Dinosaurs and many more over the last six years. We make colourful music because we dance in the dark: we are also a speakeasy party with irregular events around the UK, Paris and our second home of Berlin.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
LIVE NATION - JUNIOR DIGITAL DESIGNER (LONDON)
All our marketing is done in-house and we're looking for a talented junior digital designer to join our marketing department. You must be both creative as well as technically and commercially savvy. The ideal candidate would have a strong interest in digital delivery within the entertainment business or a similarly fast paced environment.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
7DIGITAL - LABEL & PROMOTIONS MANAGER - GERMAN-SPEAKING (LONDON)
7digital is looking for an enthusiastic and experienced Label & Promotions Manager to join our team based in East London. The Label & Promotions Manager will be solely responsible for all label relationship and promotions in Germany, Switzerland and Austria as well as our G/S/A websites and apps and all social media. They will work closely with other Label & Promotions Managers as well as internal content teams to ensure content availability and to run promotions.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
WARP PUBLISHING - COPYRIGHT AND ROYALTIES COORDINATOR (LONDON)
Warp Publishing's London office is looking for a full-time copyright and royalties coordinator to provide administrative support to an expanding team. The candidate will be highly organised and meticulous, with good numeracy skills. Along with being passionate about Warp artists, the ideal candidate will have a good understanding of copyright and a great eye for detail. Some experience with royalties is necessary and Counterpoint knowledge would be a big plus.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
[PIAS] UK - RADIO PLUGGER (LONDON)
[PIAS] UK is seeking an experienced radio plugger to join its growing in-house promotions team. The successful candidate will be based at the company's Bermondsey head office and will work as part of a team offering radio promotion services for its in-house and distributed label partners.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
MN2S - DIGITAL MARKETING ASSISTANT (LONDON)
Leading independent booking agency MN2S is looking for a Digital Marketing Assistant. Our booking agency represents both emerging and world-renowned DJs, producers and live performers across a spectrum of underground and mainstream sounds. In addition, we represent personalities from the world of sports, media and entertainment, arranging bookings for appearances and speaking engagements.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
INGROOVES - MANAGER, INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT (LONDON)
Based in London, England, with a split role of project management, business development and ongoing client relationship management. The candidate will be both; running album campaigns as part of the company's artist services team INresidence and helping introduce new clients to INgrooves Music Group alongside managing key label clients.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
INGROOVES - MANAGER, INTERNATIONAL LABEL AND PROJECT MANAGEMENT (LONDON)
Based in London, England, with a split role of project management, business development and ongoing client relationship management. The candidate will be both; running album campaigns as part of the company's artist services team INresidence and helping introduce new clients to INgrooves Music Group alongside managing key label clients.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
DEF - ARTIST PROJECT MANAGER (LONDON)
DEF Ltd is an international music company working in the artist management sector extending into label services, rights management and publishing. DEF is working worldwide with Moby, Royksopp, The Knife, Mylo, M83, Robyn and Fever Ray amongst others. We are now looking for someone who can come in and join our small dedicated team to be an Artist Project Manager starting in January 2015.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
NAME PR - SENIOR ACCOUNT MANAGER (LONDON)
Name PR is looking to hire a Senior Account Manager with significant experience in music and tech media relations. One of the world’s leading music industry PR agencies, Name PR clients include Merlin, Kobalt, the International Music Summit and Cooking Vinyl.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
 
CMU Jobs is a proven way to recruit the best music business talent for roles across the industry at all levels, from graduate to senior management. To book an ad contact Sam on 020 7099 9060 or email ads@unlimitedmedia.co.uk

Parklife Festival fined £70,000 over Mum text
Organisers of Manchester's Parklife Festival have been fined £70,000 after they sent out a promotional text message ahead of this year's event which was set to appear on the recipient's phone as if it had come from 'Mum'.

Promoting a series of post-festival club nights, the text read: "Some of the Parklife after parties have already sold out. If your going, make sure your home for breakfast! xxx" There was then a link to a web-page listing the after parties.

Now for starters, you might object to the event's suggestion that your Mum doesn't know the difference between 'your' and 'you're'. But such pedantry is pretty inconsequential when you consider the impact the Mum text might have had on recipients who had lost their mothers.

Like nineteen-year-old Ros Prior, whose mother had died of multiple sclerosis three years earlier. She is quoted by the BBC as explaining: "My phone went off and I clicked to read it.
It said, 'new message from mum' and my heart stopped. Even though it was only two seconds of sheer panic, it was horrible because I just saw 'mum'. You just think, 'Oh my god, is she still alive?' I started crying. And then I read the text and realised it was Parklife".

When people started to complain about the promotional SMS, both directly and on the social networks, Parklife organisers initially responded in a flippant matter, tweeting - according to the BBC - "so this is what it feels like to be a jar of Marmite #LoveItOrHateIt".

Though, on subsequently realising the substance of complaints from people like Prior, the festival's promoters changed their tune, admitting to media that their text campaign may have caused "unnecessary personal distress" to some recipients and adding that they would like to "apologise to them directly". They later added: "The communication was intended as a fun way of engaging festival-goers. However, the festival acknowledges that this was not an appropriate theme for everyone".

Following a number of complaints, the promotion was subsequently investigated by the Information Commissioner's Office which oversees data protection issues. And it has now fined the festival on the grounds that the tweet breached data rules because the identity of the acual sender was "disguised or concealed".

Head Of ICO Enforcement Steve Eckersley told the BBC: "This was a poorly thought out piece of marketing that didn't appear to even try to follow the rules or consider the impact that their actions would have on the privacy of individuals".

Of course the Parklife Festival didn't set out to hurt anyone's feelings with its Mum promotion, which probably did seem like a "fun way of engaging festival-goers" at the time. Though the incident - costly in terms of the both the fine and consumer anger - will presumably make marketeers using text messaging as a promotional channel a little more wary of both data laws and how recipients may respond to their messages.

iTunes chief blames labels for Apple removing download rivals from the iPod
Apple's Eddy Cue yesterday basically blamed the record companies for the fact that in the first years of the iTunes Store competitors were pretty much kept out of the music download market because of the IT giant's software.

A very long running legal squabble about the way iTunes worked in its audio DRM days has finally reached court in California. The legal complaint was first made in 2005, but the case now in court focuses on the period between 2006 and 2009. Apple is accused of continually changing its iTunes and iPod software during that period so that download stores other than Apple's couldn't sell music that worked on what was by that point the market leading digital music player.

The classic iPod played MP3 and AAC files, the latter of which could come with digital rights management controls embedded, though the DRM employed Apple's proprietary FairPlay software and only iTunes was able to sell tracks encoded in this way. It meant that if labels were unwilling to sell their music as DRM-free MP3s - and at this stage all the majors were still in the midst of their love affair with pointless DRM - iPod users could only download tracks from iTunes.

iTunes rivals - most notably RealNetworks - tried to develop their own AAC-with-DRM technology, so they could sell tracks in a format the labels were happy with but which would work on iPods. But Apple kept tweaking iPod software so that those files wouldn't play.

Indeed, often users would see tracks bought from rival download stores being deleted from their iPods whenever they did a software update (of course in these post-U2-promotion days, Apple customers probably have a nostalgic glow towards the days when the IT firm deleted tracks from devices, rather than forcing Bono's latest tedious warbling onto them).

Apple always blamed the software updates and the removal of non-iTunes tracks from iPods on the labels, saying that the measures were necessary to fulfil its DRM and anti-piracy obligations to the major record companies. The labels occasionally countered that Apple should let its rivals access FairPlay technology.

Though in the end - as the legal dimension of this debate gained momentum - the majors finally kicked their dirty DRM habit, meaning everyone (Amazon especially) could start selling iPod-compatible MP3s, and the digital music market exploded. Though the dominance iTunes built in key markets during that era continues to this day (in the download space and, in some markets, in digital music in general).

iTunes supremo Eddy Cue, the first major Apple exec to take to the stand in the court case accusing Apple of competition law violations dating to this era of its digital music business, returned to the old arguments in his testimony yesterday.

Referring to the efforts of RealNetworks et al to sell iPod-compatible DRM-ed music files as 'hacking', and name-checking former Apple chief Steve Jobs (who is due to appear in the court case posthumously via a video deposition made before his death), Cue told the court, according to CNET: "Steve was mighty upset with me and the team whenever we got hacked. If a hack happened, we had to remedy that hack within a certain time period or they [the record labels] would remove all their music from the store".

As for the labels' argument back in the DRM days that Apple should allow third parties to use its FairPlay system, Cue denied that the IT firm deliberately vetoed such proposals to block out rivals from the rapidly growing digital music space. "We thought about licensing the DRM from the beginning", he argued. "It was one of the things that we thought was the right move [that would] expand the market faster".

But technical and user-experience issues prevented such a move, he went on: "We couldn't find a way to do that and make it work reliably. Microsoft failed miserably when it tried to do this. They tried to build a DRM they could license. It would sometimes work and sometimes it didn't".

Blaming the labels more overtly for their DRM obsession, Cue went on: "We believed in interoperability, which was DRM-free. They [the record labels] wanted to have their cake and eat it too. They wanted to have all the interoperabilities of DRM-free but with all the protections of a DRM".

Not that I'd ever want to stick up for the almost certainly evil Apple empire which pretty much controls my digital life, but that's sort of how I remember that era too.

Of course, the outcome of this case won't really have a big impact on the digital music business, given the download space has moved well beyond DRM, and the digital music market at large is starting to move being the download entirely. But if it is found liable for anti-competitive activity, Apple could face big fines, and a precedent would be set for the tech community at large about allowing competitors to piggy-back on successful software ecosystems.

The case continues.

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Phil Rudd back in court over scrap with 'witness'
Former (it's increasingly looking like) AC/DC drummer Phil Rudd appeared in court again yesterday for breaching the terms of his bail, having had an alleged altercation with an unidentified man, and also with another man thought to be his own bodyguard.

One of Rudd's lawyers, Craig Tuck, has apparently confirmed - says New Zealand-based site 3News - that the man, whom Rudd approached in a local shop in the NZ town of Tauranga, is acting as a witness in drummer's ongoing case of threatening to kill and possessing drugs, charges to which he pleaded not guilty earlier this week.

Leo Rojas, a local coffee shop owner who claims to have seen the fracas happening, is reported to have said of Rudd: "I saw him following a taller, bigger guy and trying to punch the guy", adding that the other man had tried to back away from the drummer, warning him "look, I don't want to break your face", and eventually pushing Rudd away.

"[Rudd] literally fell away like a fly", says Rojas.

A third man, allegedly Rudd's bodyguard, is said to have then got involved in the confrontation, though only to hold Rudd back, at which point Rudd started "punching and kicking" him. Police later arrived, handcuffed Rudd and took him to court, where a judge placed an additional condition on his bail: that he not take any illegal drugs so as to limit any "erratic behaviour".

Ethical ticket exchange Scarlet Mist closes down
Ethical ticket exchange Scarlet Mist has closed down, founder Richard Marks announced via its Facebook page this week.

Launched in 2003, the website acted as a means for music fans to sell unwanted gig and festival tickets at face value, in reaction to the increasing numbers of tickets being sold at high mark ups by online touts. The site previously closed in 2011 because of "unacceptably high levels of fraud carried out [on the platform] by a small number of criminals", but reopened again early the following year.

In a statement about this week's closure, Marks explained: "I've been running Scarlet Mist more or less single-handledly for the past eleven years, as a part-time hobby whilst doing my day job as a hospital doctor. It has been fun to run it, and it has been a useful service. Unfortunately my wife is now disabled and I need to devote more time to caring for her and my family".

Although he admitted that continued problems with scammers using the site were also to blame, the "final straw" being the discovery of the latest fraudster to use the site to con users out of money. However, he also held out a glimmer of hope for anyone keen to see the site back online - possibly as a Facebook app.

"I am very sorry to those of you who have been hit by fraudsters", he said. "I've tried everything I can to stop them, but I cannot do enough to protect you. I'd be interested in finding anyone who wants to develop the site and use the knowledge and expertise that I have developed, but I don't have time any more for the day-to-day running".

Commenting on the continued need for sites like Scarlet Mist, he added: "Ticket touts and the secondary ticket market are here to stay. There is very little political will to address it, money talks in this world".

As previously reported, the House Of Lords recently voted to include a new clause in the Consumer Rights Bill that would force people touting tickets online to provide buyers with a bunch of extra information, a move designed to make it clearer who exactly it is reselling tickets, how big a mark-up is being added, and what the risks are to the consumer by buying tickets via the secondary market.

Though this amendment - which is not government-backed - is yet to be approved by the House Of Commons, so may or may not become law. And, as Marks notes, even if it does, while the new measures would provide some protection for consumers, it would not cease the market for secondary tickets sold at inflated prices.

Leona and Lily arrive in PPL's top Christmas songs list
So, it's Christmas everybody. I mean, it's not Christmas Day, don't worry, you didn't accidentally sleep through advent. For starters there wouldn't be a CMU Daily if it was Christmas Day, would there? Come on, think about this logically. When has there ever been a CMU Daily on Christmas Day? Never, that's when.

Not that we wouldn't like to provide you with a CMU Daily on Christmas Day. Indeed nothing would give us more pleasure than getting up at the crack of Christmas dawn to pen a music business-based missive. It's just nothing of note in music ever happened on Christmas Day. Never. I mean, there's the 'Top Of The Pop's Christmas Special'. So like I say, nothing of note in music ever happened on Christmas Day.

So you'll just have to entertain yourself the good old fashioned Yuletide way, by flicking between the music channels on Sky (we'll have none of this Vevo nonsense during the festive period thank you very much) to see what laboured formats they've devised this year as they play back-to-back Christmas songs: '4Music's Festive Adventure'; 'Magic TV presents Olly Murs' Top 40 Festive Tunes'; 'The Box Couldn't Be Bothered This Year, But Here's Some Fucking Christmas Songs'.

But what Christmas songs will you all be enjoying? Well, the record industry's collecting society PPL has done some maths and worked out what were the most played Christmas songs on broadcast channels during last year's festivities as an indication of what will be played this year.

New additions to the list, compared to PPL's last most-played festive tunes poll, include Leona Lewis's 2013 seasonal tune 'One More Sleep' and Lily Allen's cover of Keane's 'Somewhere Only We Know', which has done particularly well to appear in a list of Christmas songs given it has absolutely nothing whatsoever to do with Christmas. I mean, it's barely a song. So, well done Lily. You can have the fifth chocolate from CMU HQ's One Direction advent calendar. It'll probably be another bloody teddy bear.

Anyway, here's PPL's list of most played Christmas songs...

1. The Pogues (feat Kirsty MacColl) - Fairytale Of New York
2. Lily Allen - Somewhere Only We Know
3. Mariah Carey - All I Want For Christmas Is You
4. Wham! - Last Christmas
5. Slade - Merry Xmas Everybody
6. Wizzard - I Wish It Could Be Christmas Everyday
7. Band Aid - Do They Know It's Christmas?
8. Chris Rea - Driving Home For Christmas
9. Leona Lewis - One More Sleep
10. Shakin Stevens - Merry Christmas Everyone

CMU:DIY to return to The Roundhouse this weekend
The CMU:DIY team will return to The Roundhouse in Camden this Sunday to host the venue's Artist Toolkit Day for the second year running, and the full line-up for the proceedings has now been confirmed. Led by CMU Business Editor Chris Cooke, the day of sessions for brand new artists, and young people who aspire to work in the music industry, will consist of three main sessions.

In 'Get Started', Cooke will provide a concise overview of how the music industry works, how artists turn their content, performance and fanbase into revenue, and the companies and people they will work with along the way. He'll then be joined by an artist manager, booking agent, label exec and publishing rep to discuss what role they play in their artists' careers, with Agency X's Grant Heinrich, Coda's Matt Hanner, Island Records' Louis Brown and BMG's Michael Orchud all providing insights.

'Get Noticed' will look at how new artists can start to build a profile for themselves, and connect with key gatekeepers, including journalists, radio, and gig and festival bookers. Offering tips and advice on when it's right for new artists to reach out, and how to go about doing it, will be Alex Dale from ANASA Music, Billy Clark from Roundhouse Radio and Joe Schiavon from Transmission Music Group.

Finally 'Get Planning' will provide a guide to how aspiring artists and music industry professionals can kickstart their careers, including how grass roots artists can start to generate revenues, capture fanbase and build a direct-to-fan store, and what people could and should be doing to secure work opportunities in music companies large and small. Artists Chris T-T and Cynikal will dish out some advice, as will Music Glue's Dan Rosies, The Roundhouse's Peter Quinn and Sony Music's Emma Adler.

So that's a packed day. For people aged 16-25 who aspire to work in music, on stage or behind the scenes (or both), a small number of tickets are still available via The Roundhouse at this link.

Music exec walks 60 mile commute to raise awareness for campaign against female genital mutilation
WeGotTickets' Head Of Sales & Marketing Sam Barlow has taken it upon himself to walk from the company's office in Oxford back to his house in South London, a journey of 60 miles, to raise money for female genital mutilation charity, 28 Too Many.

Having knocked off work early yesterday to begin the trip, Barlow walked through the night and expects to arrive at his destination at some point this afternoon, estimating that the entire journey will take around 26 hours. He's undertaking the challenge as part of the 'International Sixteen Days Of Activism Against Gender Based Violence', which began last month and will finish on UN Human Rights Day, 10 Dec.

28 Too Many Executive Director Dr Ann-Marie Wilson said in a statement: "We are often asked how men and boys can contribute to the campaign to end FGM and hear from many men that they want to be part of the change but struggle to find a way to do this. We are impressed that Sam has learnt about FGM, researched how he can help and found a simple but effective way to make a difference. We will be cheering him on for every step of his walk".

In the UK alone, over 66,000 girls under the age of thirteen are at risk of the practice of FGM, according to a recent report by the UK Parliament Home Affairs Select Committee.

You can track Sam's progress and donate at www.samswalkhome.com or via his Twitter feed @walkingsam.

Ian McLagan 1945-2014
Ian 'Mac' McLagan, organist in The Small Faces and The Faces, as well as a keyboard player for the likes of The Rolling Stones, has died in his adoptive hometown of Austin, Texas, aged 69. McLagan's official site confirms he suffered a stroke, for which he was hospitalised on Tuesday, dying the next day with his family and friends around him.

Born in London in 1945, McLagan was hired by legendary artist manager Don Arden to join the Small Faces in 1965, replacing original organist Jimmy Winston. The band released a series of acclaimed and still-iconic singles like 'Itchycoo Park', 'Lazy Sunday' and 'Tin Soldier', as well as psychedelic concept LP 'Ogden's Nut Gone Flake', before disbanding in 1969 following the departure of founding frontman Steve Marriot.

McLagan and Small Faces bassist Ronnie Lane and drummer Kenney Jones were later joined by Rod Stewart and Ronnie Wood to form The Faces, releasing their first LP, 'A Nod Is As Good As A Wink... To A Blind Horse', in 1971.

After The Faces finished in 1975, McLagan went on to play keyboards on The Rolling Stones' 'Some Girls' hit 'Miss You', also working as a big-league session musician with artists like Chuck Berry, Jackson Browne, Joe Cocker, Bob Dylan, Bonnie Raitt, Frank Black, Bruce Springsteen; and releasing a string of solo albums from the late 1970s onwards. He played with Billy Bragg in The Blokes in the late 1990s, co-writing Bragg et al's 2002 LP 'England, Half English'. He carried on collaborating and playing live right up to his death, and in fact had been billed to open for Nick Lowe and Los Straitjackets at a show in Minneapolis on the day he died.

Paying tribute, McLagan's Small Faces/Faces bandmate Kenney Jones has said: "I am completely devastated by this shocking news, and I know this goes for Ronnie and Rod also".

Billy Bragg, meanwhile, has written a piece honouring McLagan in The Guardian. He says: "Having been a teenage Faces fan, to simply meet Ian McLagan would have been an honour. To have played with him in a band and to know him as a dear friend was an immense privilege. It was his 'live in the moment' attitude that helped him keep his feet on the ground through the incredible highs and the lows that he experienced in a life lived to the full. I'm glad to have known him and sorry that he's gone".

McLagan is survived by his son Lee, his brother Mike and a granddaughter; his wife having died in a car crash in 2006.

  Vigsy's Club Tip: The Hydra presents Ninja Tune at Studio Spaces E1
The Hydra and Ninja Tune take over East London's Studio Spaces E1 tomorrow night, with a pretty phenomenal line-up. Ready to provide a mix of live and DJ sets are Lee Bannon, my man to watch FaltyDL, Bonobo, The Bug, Illum Sphere, Actress, Machinedrum and the rather excellent Dutch beatster Martyn.

The collection of big names and relatively short set times make this more of a gig than a club night, and that is reflected in the entry price somewhat. But, hey ho, it's hard to argue when you're presented with such a smorgasbord of treats from the Ninja stable.

Saturday 6 Dec, Studio Spaces E1, Unit 2, 110 Pennington Street, Wapping, London E1W 2BB, 10pm - 6am, £27.50. More info here.
CLICK HERE to read and share online
 

Nick 'Gravenhurst' Talbot dies
Musician, producer and journalist Nick Talbot, aka Gravenhurst, has died aged 37, his label Warp announced yesterday.

Talbot was due to begin the UK leg of a tour celebrating the tenth anniversary of his signing to Warp in Leeds last night. Last month he played the first three dates of the tour in Europe, performing his debut album for the label, 'Flashlight Seasons', in full.

In a statement yesterday afternoon, Warp said: "We are shocked and saddened to share the news that Nick Talbot aka Gravenhurst has passed away aged 37. An immensely talented singer-songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, record producer and journalist, he will be hugely missed. Nick's family and friends request privacy at this difficult time".

His manager, Michelle Hilborne added: "I am utterly devastated to confirm that Nick Talbot, also known under the performing name Gravenhurst, has passed away aged 37. The finest, most extraordinary and inspirational songwriter, singer and performer, and a remarkable producer and journalist, Nick's work has deeply affected so many people all over the world. Outstandingly intelligent, compassionate, fascinating and witty, Nick was the dearest friend and his absence brings indescribable sorrow".

This week, Warp re-issued three of Talbot's albums as Gravenhurst, 'Flashlight Seasons' and 'Black Holes In The Sand', alongside a compilation of previously unreleased music titled 'Offerings: Lost Songs 2000-2004'. He also recently released a short documentary looking at how Bristol had shaped his music, which you can watch here.

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The Script rescue woman from motorway crash
The Script rescued a woman from a crashed car as they travelled to Manchester to perform at Key103's Christmas Live concert at Manchester Arena yesterday.

Interviewed by the radio station ahead of the gig, presenter Adam Catterall explained that the woman had called in to say what had happened. Guitarist Mark Sheenan confirmed that they had seen the car hit the central reservation and spin out of control down the motorway.

Frontman Danny O'Donoghue picked up the story, saying: "We jumped out and headed straight over to her car. I tried the door first and it was totally jammed, it wouldn't open. She was just looking straight forward in shock. I was just trying to get her attention, saying 'Are you all right, love? Are you all right?' Meanwhile, Mark noticed that there was smoke coming from the engine. Of course [you shouldn't usually] move somebody from an accident, but if there's smoke coming from the engine then you want to get them out as quickly as possible".

"The girl said she couldn't feel her legs and stuff", he continued. "I was really worried, so we just talked to her a little bit, talked her down. She went to move one of her legs, so I knew she had power in her legs. Then she went to get up out of the car but she couldn't, she was so weak, so we just helped her over to the side of the road, sat her down, put a jacket around her, gave her some drink and stuff and just waited for the ambulance".

He added that they had subsequently moved her onto their tour bus, where she recovered from the shock of the accident more, saying: "There was a moment when she just went, '...oh my god it's The Script!'"

Once in the ambulance, she apparently got the paramedics to come and ask if she could have a picture taken with the band. "The things people do to meet a band, eh?" joked Sheehan.

Watch possibly the first 'car crash interview' in history that the interviewee is happy for you to see in full here.

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Andre 3000 bemoans 'sell out' Outkast reunion
Andre 3000 has shockingly revealed that Outkast's big 20th anniversary re-activation earlier this year was, on his part at least, done for financial reasons, rather than for the love of, in his words, "pedalling" the same old hits once more. Like I said, shocking, right?

He made the claim whilst talking to Nicholas Jaar (no idea why) in a conversation for The Fader, which was meant to centre on 'I Feel Ya', a Miami-based exhibition that's taking place at the moment featuring the 47 jumpsuits 3000 created and wore for all the recent Outkast shows.

Andre said: "I didn't wanna do the tour. We hadn't performed in ten years. It was old songs". And then he was like: "I'm like, 'How am I gonna present these songs? I don't have nothing new to say'. So I was like, 'Maybe I can start saying new stuff while doing these old songs'". The "new stuff" became wearing a series of jumpsuits with slogans printed on them. "It became a theme" he went on, "where I was more excited about [the jumpsuits] than the actual show. This is fun, running out in these".

As for why he ever agreed to the reunion in the first place, he goes on: "It was a decision. I'm 39, I got a seventeen year old kid and I gotta support certain things. And my partner Big Boi is like, 'This is a great thing for all of us'. I didn't wanna do it - so I knew I was doing it for a reason - I felt like there was a certain sell-out".

But that's all fine, because now he's being honest about it. "Maybe if I'm telling people, 'I am selling out', then it's not as bad as pretending. It's being honest about it like, 'Shit, I did these songs when I was seventeen and I'm out here pedalling them now'. But it's the honest thing, that's what it is. I felt weird about going out on stage and doing it again. I felt like people would be like, 'Y'all are doing all these festivals, y'all are just doing it for money'. And I felt like a sell-out, honestly. So I was like, if I'm in on the joke, I'll feel cool about it".

Hey, at least now the fans are now in on the joke too; having paid for tickets to see Outkast 'pedalling' away joylessly at all those festivals. And Andre has his cash now so it's all fine. Ha ha ha. That's a good joke. Ha.

Olly Murs, Future Brown, Mikky Ekko, and, oh, you know...

Other notable announcements and developments today...

• Johnny Jewel's co-originator of the Italians Do It Better label, Mike Simonetti, has split and started a separate record company, Two Mikes Records, with Captured Tracks boss Mike Sniper. Cool. The first release on 14 Apr 2015 shall be 'The Past We Leave Behind', the first LP from Simonetti's side-band with Silver Hands' Elizabeth Wright. And this is the title track.

• Electronic type Powell has signed to the increasingly artist-acquisitive XL Recordings, who'll put out the producer's twelve-inch 'single' I guess you'd call it, the two-track 'Sylvester Stallone/Smut', on a mystery date. Thanks for the info, XL. NOT. Clips of both songs are available via Rush Hour.

CMU approved "'Power Rangers'-esque production super-corps" Future Brown are releasing their first LP on 24 Feb; with Kelela, Tink, Sicko Mobb and loads of other vocalists all 'locked in'. Stream lead track, the Shawnna and DJ Victoriouz-featuring 'Talkin Bandz' here, and read an in-depth Fader feature on FB here.

• Purity Ring are doing another circle of the old slightly sinister synth-pop racetrack, and are officially back! With a new single, no less, titled 'Push Pull'. Have a wrangle with it now via this sort of animated YouTube clip.

• Mikky Ekko has released a video for the title track of his soon-to-be-released debut album, 'Time'. So you might as well watch it.

• As they work towards their third album, Empire Of The Sun have released a new song called 'Wandering Star'. It is their contribution to the soundtrack of 'Dumb & Dumber' sequel, 'Dumb & Dumber To'. Listen here, I guess.

The world's "most viral" songmaker Hozier is going to go on a tour of the UK in May. What fun. To celebrate, he's postponed two January shows in Oxford and Birmingham. Tickets for the new dates go on sale a week today via Hozier's website. Oh, and here's the video for new single, 'From Eden', which is out on 26 Jan.

• Olly 'The Puppetmaster' Murs has added two new dates to his 2015 UK arena tour. The first at Glasgow's SSE Hydro on 16 Apr, the second at the O2 Arena in London on 7 May. Well I never.

CMU Beef Of The Week #234: Classical Music v Its Audience
Two years ago, Universal International CEO Max Hole said that classical music needed to overcome its "perceived elitism" and ditch its "unwritten etiquette" in order to convince more people to experience live performances. "I am worried that the very traditions and institutions that seek to celebrate, promote and preserve classical music are in danger of causing the genre great harm and hindering its growth", he added.

This memo possibly never reached violinist Kyung-Wha Chung, who made her return to the London stage this week, after twelve years, at the Royal Festival Hall. After such a long absence, there was a lot of pressure on Chung, who in the 70s and 80s became one of the world's most highly regarded violin soloists. And some reviewers at this week's show noted a tension in the room from the very beginning of her opening piece, Mozart's 'Sonata In G', which came to a head during a break in the performance.

Many in the audience took the silence as a cue to clear their throats, which seemingly annoyed Chung. And then, just as she was about to begin again, she apparently conferred with her piano accompanist Kevin Kenner before turning to the parents of a nearby child in the audience, who had also had a little cough, and telling them "maybe you should bring her back when she's older".

She then proceeded to stare them down occasionally during the remainder of the performance to ensure her point was properly made. So, good work making the world of classical music welcoming for all there.

"With one shrivelling put-down, a tetchy atmosphere turned toxic", wrote Times critic Anna Picard. Though The Guardian's Erica Jeal also noted: "Terrified into silence, the audience behaved impeccably during Prokofiev's 'Sonata No 1', from the first movement's muscular declamations to the silvery, shimmering melodies of the finale. I can't remember the first half of a concert ever feeling this tense".

So, everyone might have been having a shit time, but at least they were well behaved. Something some people thought was a reasonable pay-off, such as composer Sasha Valerie Millwood, who wrote in a comment on a Slipped Disc report on the incident: "I would like to publicly express my gratitude to Chang for drawing attention to this issue - poor audience behaviour has ruined a great many concerts in my experience, both on occasions where I was on stage and on occasions where I was in the audience".

According to the BBC's Magnus McGrandle, many of the other children in the audience responded by falling asleep as the concert continued. You don't get a harsher reviewer than a child. However, this too can backfire. In October at a concert in Miami, conductor Michael Tilson Thomas asked the mother of a sleeping/restless child (depending on whose story you believe) to move/leave (ditto).

Anyway, back to the coughing. The Royal Festival Hall issued a statement about the incident, telling the BBC: "At this time of the year in particular, coughing isn't uncommon at events at any venue. We don't discourage parents or carers who wish to bring young people to an evening event and we do, where possible, check that they are aware of the nature of the event. We are aware that Kyung-Wha Chung is also a keen supporter of young people experiencing classical music".

Whether or not Chung made a good a point by chastising the coughing girl's parents is still a matter for debate, though this incident does suggest that classical music is still an artform struggling to make itself accessible. If people holding in their coughs until breaks in the music is the worst thing performers in the genre have to contend with, then their audiences are either overly polite or terrified of breaking one of those unwritten rules Hole noted.

Of course it's a matter of balance. Outside of classical music, audiences could do with being a bit more considerate. I reckon I can count the number of non-classical gigs I've been to in the last five years where a sizeable number of people in the audience didn't act like fucking dicks on one hand. Classical music shouldn't be seeking to move to a domain where performers (and other audience members) have to learn to tolerate people talking and waving their phones around throughout the show. But that said, maybe let's not make every (or any) child's first experience of live music involve being told off for something pretty minor, eh?

 
ANDY MALT | Editor
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