MONDAY 11 MAY 2015
TODAY'S TOP STORY: Both festival and delegate tickets for this year's Great Escape - the tenth anniversary edition - have now sold out, as the music industry prepares to amass in Brighton later this week for three days of gigs, parties, networking, talks and debates. And as tickets for the event sold out on Friday, organisers confirmed that there would be a record number of secret shows taking place this year... [READ MORE]
 
TODAY'S APPROVED: Having been working on this solo project for the last two years, former Zulu Winter drummer Guy Henderson has now launched Oxon's first track into the world - 'Falling Leaves' - taken from a forthcoming EP, which was recorded between London and Berlin. "Now the gloves are off", threatens the song's chorus, washed in a blend of live and electronic sounds. It's actually a... [READ MORE]
TOP STORIES Great Escape sells out: Paul Weller secret gig, Ghetts and Mike Skinner films, CMU Insights programme and microsite
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LEGAL Record industry's Google takedown frenzy passes 200 million mark
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LABELS & PUBLISHERS PRS For Music confirms revenue growth in 2014
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LIVE BUSINESS A2IM calls on US to relax visa requirements of Canadian musicians
Bestival's Ben Turner discusses taking festivals international
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DIGITAL & D2F SERVICES Spotify revenues and losses up last year
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EDUCATION & EVENTS CMU's music rights evening course returns
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INDUSTRY PEOPLE John Whittingdale named Culture Secretary
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ARTIST NEWS Amorphous Androgynous on why their Noel Gallagher collaborations didn't result in much
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RELEASES Prince releases protest song for Baltimore
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AND FINALLY... Sugar? No thanks. Maroon 5's Adam Levine changes his tune
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HOUSE OF 27 – SOCIAL MEDIA INTERNSHIP (PAID) (LONDON)
House of 27 is a UK digital PR company representing both development and established artists across unsigned, independent label and major record label setups. We require an intern to support our small, friendly team in our daily work environment. An additional interest in A&R and scouting new bands would be ideal, but passion for new music and enthusiasm for digital is a must.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
DOMINO RECORDING CO - DIGITAL OPERATIONS MANAGER (LONDON)
Domino Recording Co is seeking a high calibre individual to oversee its digital operations processes, based in the London office. This full-time position will be responsible for managing direct global operations relationships across digital music partners (eg iTunes, Spotify, Google Play, Millward Brown), and ongoing management of the digital catalogue across the label.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
LIVE NATION - EVENT TICKETING MANAGER (LONDON)
Live Nation requires an Event Ticketing Manager to maximise ticket sales for Live Nation events by providing effective ticketing information and advice; and proactively managing inventory, ticket agents and allocations.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
[PIAS] - BUSINESS AFFAIRS MANAGER (LONDON)
[PIAS] Entertainment Group is looking for an experienced lawyer to join their UK legal team at their head office in Bermondsey. The role will take primary responsibility for [PIAS] Artist and Label Services division, but will also have significant involvement in all other legal areas of the business to include [PIAS] Co-operative and its roster of partner labels and its own Play It Again Sam label.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
KOBALT LABEL SERVICES - MARKETING CO-ORDINATOR (LONDON)
Kobalt Label Services requires a Marketing Co-ordinator to assist the UK and International Marketing teams at KLS, as well as support the MD for KLS in the running of day to day activities within the KLS marketing team. The candidate will report to KLS MD but will get direction day to day from the VP, International Marketing, as well as the Head of UK Marketing for KLS.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
MAMA & COMPANY - GENERAL MANAGER, LIVERPOOL ARTS CLUB (LIVERPOOL)
This is a fantastic opportunity to work and grow with an exciting company that owns some of the UK’s most established venues. To manage the venue both efficiently and effectively ensuring that the diary is commercially maximised and all statutory duties are discharged. To effectively manage the kitchen and restaurant operation, ensuring GP is maintained and customer satisfaction is the primary focus.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
SJM CONCERTS - DEPUTY MARKETING MANAGER (MANCHESTER)
SJM Concerts seeks a Deputy Marketing Manager to support our marketing team to maximise exposure of events promoted by the company, and to implement marketing campaigns to generate sales for new tours and events via various platforms including press, radio, TV, digital and print.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
SUPAPASS - BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT EXECUTIVE (LONDON OR NORWICH)
SupaPass is an exciting new digital music platform connecting superfans with their favourite bands. SupaPass gives labels and artists a smart way to monetise their digital content, unlocking new revenue streams and amplifying superfan loyalty by bringing everything essential from social to streaming in one place. We are seeking an ambitious and driven business development executive with a deep understanding and strong network across music, entertainment and music-tech.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
DOMINO - WAREHOUSE MANAGER (LONDON)
We are looking for a bright, energetic warehouse manager with plenty of enthusiasm to supervise our warehouse operation.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
MANAGEMENT ASSISTANT (LONDON)
Experienced Management Assistant required for established London based artist management company. Candidates must have relevant experience in all areas of artist management and must demonstrate their knowledge and experience in assisting with a global release and live campaign. Role will include providing support to artist managers, co-ordinating day to day activities for artists including general administrative duties and personal assistant duties.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
 
   
DOMINO - UK DIGITAL MARKETING MANAGER (LONDON)
Domino is seeking a UK Digital Manager to work alongside our Digital and Project Management departments. The ideal candidate will take full responsibility for defining and implementing digital marketing strategy and will evaluate and communicate ongoing campaign effectiveness. Extending the reach and engagement of our marketing campaigns with creative ideas is key.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
THE STATE51 CONSPIRACY - SUPPORT TEAM ASSISTANT (LONDON)
The state51 Conspiracy is looking for a bright, enthusiastic, collaborative and well-organised person to join its support team. Support Team Assistants provide critical support to our partners (labels, artists), customers, music services, suppliers and to the rest of the business, as needed.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
 
CMU Jobs is a proven way to recruit the best music business talent for roles across the industry at all levels, from graduate to senior management. To book an ad contact Sam on 020 7099 9060 or email ads@unlimitedmedia.co.uk
 

Great Escape sells out: Paul Weller secret gig, Ghetts and Mike Skinner films, CMU Insights programme and microsite
Both festival and delegate tickets for this year's Great Escape - the tenth anniversary edition - have now sold out, as the music industry prepares to amass in Brighton later this week for three days of gigs, parties, networking, talks and debates.

And as tickets for the event sold out on Friday, organisers confirmed that there would be a record number of secret shows taking place this year, including Amazon Music presenting Paul Weller, which isn't a secret (we just told you), but the venue is. Festival-goers and delegates can find out more about the secret gigs via the TGE text service and app.

Also added to the bill this year are two short film premieres complete with Q&A sessions involving the people they feature: Mike Skinner and Ghetts. The latter film is 'War Of The Minds', created as part of the Jack Rocks music programme led by Jack Daniel's, and chronicles the life and career of Ghetts by "looking at the inner creative tensions that Ghetts faces as an artist - represented by three characters, Ghetts, Ghetto and Justin".

On the convention side, as much previously reported, we are pleased to present CMU Insights @ The Great Escape, four full-day mini-conferences putting the spotlight on licensing, brands, music marketing and the artist/label relationship. Taking place at Dukes @ Komedia on Thursday and Friday, you can check the full CMU programme here online, or in this PDF guide.

And for those not in the room, we'll be providing coverage of the CMU sessions this year via a special CMU@TGE microsite, which will feature reports, guides and key facts and figures during the event itself and then a series of CMU@TGE podcasts in the weeks that follow. Follow this coverage at tge2015.cmuinsights.com

Record industry's Google takedown frenzy passes 200 million mark
The record industry has passed the 200 million mark in its Google takedown frenzy, which is pretty impressive given it only passed the 100 million point in January 2014.

Not that record label trade groups like the UK's BPI and America's RIAA get too many kicks out of such stats. As previously reported, the industry associations now submit takedown notices on an industrial scale to Google, each requesting that links to unlicensed recordings be removed from the web giant's search engine. But while Google does enact such takedown requests, the record labels would like the firm to be more proactive, for example removing entirely all links to websites that have been labelled rampant copyright infringers by the courts.

Noting the recent landmark takedown stat, a spokesperson for the BPI told Torrentfreak: "The fact that BPI and RIAA have together removed 200 million illegal results from Google demonstrates just how much more needs to be done to clean up search".

While noting the European Commission's previously reported digital single market initiative, the spokesperson continued: "If the digital single market is to unlock growth, consumers need be directed to legal sources for entertainment ahead of the online black market".

Google has, of course, made some alternations to its mysterious algorithms in a bid to demote unlicensed sources of content, the most recent of which, the BPI admits, were a "positive step". But the trade group adds: "If further progress is not made swiftly to ensure that searches for entertainment content yield overwhelmingly legal results - for instance by boosting the ranking of known licensed sites for appropriate types of search - then the new UK Government and the EU Commission should intervene to make that happen".

PRS For Music confirms revenue growth in 2014
The UK music publishing sector's collecting society PRS For Music last week reported a total royalty income for 2014 of £664.3 million. This including royalties generated by both the public performance and mechanical licensing of songs represented by the organisation (the latter licensed on behalf of MCPS of course, which is now a standalone society). Total revenues for last year were up 1% on 2013 on a constant currency basis.

The PRS figures reflected trends we've already seen in record industry stats for 2014, in that digital royalties surpassed the monies publishers received from CD sales for the first time, and income from streaming platforms was higher than the publisher's cut of download monies, also for the first time. The online market contributed £79.7 million to PRS revenues in total, while physical product sales generated £63.1 million.

Though public performance and broadcast remain bigger earners for the collecting society, the former bringing in £168.3 million in total, and the latter £165 million. International revenues, which are grouped as one in the society's figures, were also up to £188.2 million.

And if that's enough numbers to be processing for now, how about some words from PRS boss Robert Ashcroft? He told reporters: "Despite the impact of a challenging economic backdrop in key international territories, a strong pound and the decline of the physical market, we managed to achieve our budgeted revenues in 2014".

Meanwhile, bigging up his own organisation's efforts to make the collection and delivery of monies more efficient, he continued: "We work hard to provide an outstanding service to members with the lowest possible charge to them. Despite the potential disruption of two office moves, a major systems upgrade and a dramatic increase in the volume of music usage to process, we managed to contain our costs to within budgeted levels while at the same time increasing our distribution frequency to ensure that the money reached our members more swiftly than ever before. Though there remains much more to be done as we modernise PRS For Music's operations, this was nonetheless a landmark performance in our centenary year".

A2IM calls on US to relax visa requirements of Canadian musicians
American indie label trade group A2IM used the Canadian Music Week conference in Toronto last week to call on the US to remove visa requirements for Canadian artists who wish to tour the States.

The Canadian government last year axed the red tape American artists used to have to navigate to tour north of the border, and A2IM reckons its home country should return the favour, which seems reasonable.

The trade group said on Friday: "Under current legislation, Canadian artists are only able to tour within the US after securing a P Visa, a practice that is mandated to be processed in two weeks but can often stretch to six months time. This can stall tours and result in artists, US clubs and restaurants losing revenue. Relaxing visa requirements would allow for an open exchange of ideas and cultural reciprocity between two neighbouring countries".

Noting how this impacts on its members, A2IM added: "Our diverse membership nationwide with Canadian artists on their roster has been impacted by this practice and support eliminating the visa requirement".

UK artists are also familiar with the visa frustrations connected to playing your tunes on American soil. It remains to be seen if Canadian musicians get to circumvent all that hassle anytime soon.

--------------------------------------------------

Bestival's Ben Turner discusses taking festivals international
Bestival co-founder Ben Turner appeared at the Live Touring Summit at Canadian Music Week last Friday, ostensibly to discuss the festival brand's move outside the UK via its new Toronto edition due to take place next month, though he also had plenty of thoughts on the international festival market as a whole.

Explaining how Bestival differentiates itself in a crowded market place, Turner cited its creativity as being the most important factor, reckoning that when the festival first launched in the UK it did so in a sector dominated by events that just offered "burgers and bands". But that creativity has cost implications. "We looked at selling Bestival six or seven years ago", he admitted. "But the minute buyers saw our creative spend they said, 'These guys are crazy, let's not go near them'".

Ultimately, he said, the decision to keep Bestival independent was the right one, even if he understands why other festivals look to ally with major players. Though he reckons such alliances are bad for the independent festival sector in general. Noting Bonnaroo's recent deal with Live Nation, he said: "I think the Bonnaroo owners are pretty strong willed, so I don't think Bonnaroo will change, it's a strategic alliance, but that's still a concern".

Though the biggest challenge for the festival market, Turner mused, is the increasing cost of big name acts. "The agent world has to take note of what we're saying", he told his audience. "It can't always be a million dollars, two million dollars a time. We have a huge internal fight for talent budget every year at Bestival. Every year the prices go up, but we have to compete or die".

Nevertheless, Turner was positive about the future of festivals, identifying Asia - where his dance industry conference IMS recently launched a new event - as a particular area for growth. "Asia is a hugely exciting opportunity. IMS decided to do something in Asia, just to see what we could do. We had a local partner, and we learned about the amazing opportunity that's out there".

As for further growing the Bestival brand, he added: "We're getting bizarre offers for Bestival in unusual places. I think you're going to see a growth in international festival brands. The interest Coachella gets around the world is mind-blowing".

But, he cautioned, it's important to be careful when taking an established festival brand into new territories. "We've dealt with promoters who've built up something independently over the years in their home territory, and then in rolls the Ultra Festival and that means the existing event will never be able to book any of the big acts again. It's not right that the little guy gets squeezed out. I really hope that Bestival has been seeded into Toronto in an honest way. We were going to come in and potentially do something bigger, but I'm glad we haven't, we're starting small, just like we did in England".

Of course not everyone can travel the world to experience all these festivals and, as a slight aside, Turner noted the hype surrounding virtual reality, suggesting that, while the focus is currently on gaming, it could be a big deal for the live music industry too. "Virtual reality is the next big ticketing innovation", he said. "Watching bands in your living room. I don't think you can recreate the club experience that way, but for live gigs and sport, I think it has really exciting potential".

Spotify revenues and losses up last year
Spotify saw both revenues and losses rise last year, which is no surprise really, given we knew the monies it pays into the music industry shot up in 2014, but at the same time an aggressive growth strategy in a tight-profit-margin business is costly.

According to figures published by the Spotify parent company last week, revenues in 2014 were up 45% to 1.08 billion euros. As a result payouts to the music industry rose more or less the same amount to 882 million euros. But Spotify itself remains a loss-making business, with net losses up 190% year-on-year to 162 million euros.

Which, as we say, isn't surprising given where the streaming service currently sits in its grand master plan. Though it's a reminder that - while the founders and early investors in companies like Spotify may earn big when they eventually sell - for the time being the streaming sector remains a loss-making industry for the digital platforms.

John Whittingdale named Culture Secretary
MP for Maldon, John Whittingdale, has been given the role of Secretary Of State For Culture, Media And Sport in that there David Cameron's new cabinet.

Whittingdale's appointment will please some in the music industry. A long-term chair of Parliament's Culture, Media And Sport Select Committee, he has been supportive of the creative industries in the past, and pushed for provisions to prevent illegal file-sharing to be included in the 2010 Digital Economy Act (which may have come to nothing, but he helped get them in the statute).

He replaces Sajid Javid, now Business Secretary, who proved a controversial figure in the culture job for his support of the secondary ticketing industry.

CMU's music rights evening course returns
The latest season of CMU Insights evening seminars kicks off tonight, and that means the three part course 'Understanding Music Rights - A Complete Overview' starts next Monday.

This three-parter explains all you need to know about music copyright law, and then explores music licensing, including when and why the music industry decides to license as one through the collective licensing system. The third session provides an overview of the music rights sector at large, including a review of the digital market in 2015.

The three two-hour seminars - taking place at 6.30pm on Monday 18 May, 1, 8 Jun - are designed to equip anyone working with music copyright - as an owner, administrator or customer - with all they need to know to properly understand how music rights work.

A place on the three-part course is just £125 - tickets are available here.

  Approved: Oxon
Having been working on this solo project for the last two years, former Zulu Winter drummer Guy Henderson has now launched Oxon's first track into the world - 'Falling Leaves' - taken from a forthcoming EP, which was recorded between London and Berlin.

"Now the gloves are off", threatens the song's chorus, washed in a blend of live and electronic sounds. It's actually a pretty relaxed piece of music though, layers slowly added over its four minutes that draw you in, meaning there's more to hear in the track with each listen.

Keep an eye on SoundCloud for more music from Oxon and watch the newly posted video for 'Falling Leaves' here.
CLICK HERE to read and share online
 

Amorphous Androgynous on why their Noel Gallagher collaborations didn't result in much
Garry Cobain off of Amorphous Androgynous has been discussing his collaborations with Noel Gallagher.

As previously reported, Gallagher originally planned to release a collaborative album with Future Sound Of London's psychedelic rock offshoot, but then he said the success of his debut solo record had delayed the venture somewhat, adding in October 2012 that the "moment had now passed" for the joint venture.

Speaking to the Guardian, Cobain says that their collaboration ran aground when it turned out that Gallagher wasn't looking for quite the radical new sound he'd initially implied: "It started out promisingly. When Noel first came round to my house with a bunch of demos, he was strangely subdued and insecure. Oasis were past their sell-by date. I saw a guy with a guitar who needed something exciting. We were all over the press with our new vision of psychedelia and he leaned very heavily on us. He went into it with all the right intentions".

But, Cobain goes on, "[while] the studio wasn't disharmonious, I did have to work around his limitations and it quickly became apparent that rather than singing and playing differently, he wanted to do things exactly the same as ever. We tried to force him to write new material. But he dragged his heels and failed to stretch himself"

In the end Amorphous Androgynous did provide the backing tracks to two songs that appeared on Gallagher's more recent High Flying Birds album 'Chasing Yesterday': 'The Right Stuff' and 'The Mexican'.

"We spent six months on them", Cobain says. "[And] now people are citing 'The Right Stuff' as one of the best things he has done, and proof of how good he can be when he explores."

Prince releases protest song for Baltimore
Prince has released a protest song following the death in Baltimore of Freddie Gray, the man who died while in police custody last month.

Gray's death, the latest in a number of incidents involving police brutality against young African-American men, has resulted in six Baltimore police officers facing charges including murder and manslaughter. Subsequent protests led to rioting in the city.

Titled 'Baltimore', Prince's track opens with the lyrics, "Nobody got in nobody's way. So I guess you could say it was a good day. At least a little better than the day in Baltimore. Does anybody hear us pray for Michael Brown or Freddie Gray? Peace is more than the absence of war".

A reporter for Fox News was invited to watch the recording of the original demo version of the song with ThirdEyeGirl, before Prince re-recorded the track from scratch. Guest vocals on the final version are provided by singer Eryn Allen Kane.

Listen to 'Baltimore' here.

Sugar? No thanks. Maroon 5's Adam Levine changes his tune
"Your sugar. Yes, please", sang Adam Levine on 'Sugar' by Maroon 5. "Won't you come and put it down on me?" And yet, when someone did just that, he did not look very happy at all. Be careful what you wish for, I guess.

While signing autographs for fans outside the 'Jimmy Kimmel Live!' studios in LA last week, a man appeared in the crowd and poured a bag of icing sugar over the singer. The man was restrained by security and arrested on suspicion of battery, police confirmed to CNN. However, as we all know, batter is made with eggs, milk and flour.

Watch Levine as he moves like Jagger (I imagine) away from the sugar cloud that suddenly envelops him here.

 
ANDY MALT | Editor
Andy heads up the team, overseeing the CMU bulletin and website, coordinating features and interviews, reporting on artist and business stories, and contributing to the CMU Approved column.
Email andy@unlimitedmedia.co.uk (except press releases, see below)
   
CHRIS COOKE | MD & Business Editor
Chris provides music business coverage and analysis. Chris also leads the CMU Insights training and consultancy business and education programme CMU:DIY, and heads up CMU publisher 3CM UnLimited.
Email chris@unlimitedmedia.co.uk (except press releases, see below)
   
SAM TAYLOR | Commercial Manager & Insights Associate
Sam oversees the commercial side of the CMU media, leading on sales and sponsorship, plus helps manage and deliver the CMU Insights training courses and consultancy services.
Email sam@unlimitedmedia.co.uk or call 020 7099 9060
   
CARO MOSES | Co-Publisher
Caro helps oversee the CMU media, while as a Director of 3CM UnLimited she heads up the company's other two titles ThisWeek London and ThreeWeeks Edinburgh, and supports other parts of the business.
Email caro@unlimitedmedia.co.uk
Send ALL press releases to musicnews@unlimitedmedia.co.uk - this is checked daily by the whole editorial team meaning your release will definitely get to the right person.

For details of the training and consultancy services offered by CMU Insights click here - Andy and Chris are also available to provide music business comment, just email them direct.

To promote your company or advertise jobs or services to the entire UK music industry via the CMU bulletin or website contact Sam on 020 7099 9060 or email ads@unlimitedmedia.co.uk
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