FRIDAY 15 MAY 2015
TODAY'S TOP STORY: Day two of CMU Insights @ The Great Escape kicked off this morning with the #VoteForMusic keynote, which saw TGE co-founder Martin Elbourne, Cooking Vinyl's Martin Goldschmidt, Yellowbrick Music's Meredith Cork and Dan Le Sac delivering speeches outlining what they would like the new government to do for music and the music industry. Also... [READ MORE]
 
TODAY'S APPROVED: New York's Johnny D has had a fair impact on house history as owner of the Henry St label. This Saturday he's DJing at Plan B launching the '20 Years Of Henry St' compo next week on BBE with some proper classics, including The Bucketheads' 'The Bomb', Ashley Beedle & Phil Asher's 'Sunrize', Armand Van Helden's 'Hey Baby'. If you're looking for that quality vibe... [READ MORE]
   
BEEF OF THE WEEK: Who do you think about when you think about sexual problems? Thom Yorke, right? I know, every time. It's like, you're sitting there thinking about erectile dysfunction of an evening, and then suddenly there he is. I mean, to be fair, this gif does pop into my head roughly every six seconds, but that's by the by. Anyway, I don't need you to confirm the inner working... [READ MORE]
TOP STORIES The Hub presents results of #VoteForMusic campaign at CMU Insights @ The Great Escape
JUMP | ONLINE
LEGAL BMI wins Pandora royalties case, streaming service to appeal
JUMP | ONLINE
LABELS & PUBLISHERS How the global music market is changing
JUMP | ONLINE
BRANDS & MERCH Brands increasingly asking for cut of publishing rights on ad sync music
What to do when an advert rips off your music
Five steps to better brand partnerships
JUMP | ONLINE
THE GREAT ESCAPE Yellowbrick Music's Meredith Cork calls on government to offer more financial support for musicians
Dan Le Sac: An open letter to David Cameron
JUMP | ONLINE
ARTIST NEWS BB King dies
JUMP | ONLINE
AND FINALLY... CMU Beef Of The Week #254: Iran v Thom Yorke
JUMP | ONLINE
 
Click JUMP to skip direct to a section of this email or ONLINE to read and share stories on the CMU website (JUMP option may not work in all email readers). For regular updates from Team CMU follow us on Twitter, Facebook or Tumblr.
 
 
ELITE MUSIC MANAGEMENT - BOOKING AGENT & ASSISTANT BOOKING AGENT (BRIGHTON)
Since 1999, Brighton based Elite Music Management has represented breakthrough DJs, producers and label parties. We are looking for two dynamic, talented individuals to work as part of a hard-working team. You will be required to promote a roster of acts, and manage their worldwide tour diaries. You will liaise with artists, managers and promoters on a daily basis.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
UNDER THE BRIDGE - ACTING GENERAL MANAGER (LONDON)
We require an Acting General Manager to manage and deliver the content of events at Under the Bridge including corporate events, private events, showcases, public music events and match days. To ensure the smooth operational running of Under The Bridge.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
LISTEN UP - EVENTS PRESS OFFICER (LONDON)
Listen Up provides a bespoke 360 promotional service offering radio, club, online and print campaigns in the UK and worldwide, consistently delivering results to clients in a diverse range of musical genres. We are hiring an experienced Events Press Officer to join the events team at Listen Up. The candidate will need 3-4 years' experience running print and online events campaigns and will be working across Listen Up’s extensive festival and events roster.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
MAMA & COMPANY - E-MARKETING CO-ORDINATOR (LONDON)
MAMA & Company are looking for an experienced E-marketing Co-ordinator. This is a fantastic opportunity to work and grow with an exciting company who own some of London's most established venues. You will need to have experience of managing email marketing campaigns, database management and analysis, as well as holding high levels of computer literacy. Knowledge of HTML, CSS and Java is essential.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
HOUSE OF 27 – SOCIAL MEDIA INTERNSHIP (PAID) (LONDON)
House of 27 is a UK digital PR company representing both development and established artists across unsigned, independent label and major record label setups. We require an intern to support our small, friendly team in our daily work environment. An additional interest in A&R and scouting new bands would be ideal, but passion for new music and enthusiasm for digital is a must.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
DOMINO RECORDING CO - DIGITAL OPERATIONS MANAGER (LONDON)
Domino Recording Co is seeking a high calibre individual to oversee its digital operations processes, based in the London office. This full-time position will be responsible for managing direct global operations relationships across digital music partners (eg iTunes, Spotify, Google Play, Millward Brown), and ongoing management of the digital catalogue across the label.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
LIVE NATION - EVENT TICKETING MANAGER (LONDON)
Live Nation requires an Event Ticketing Manager to maximise ticket sales for Live Nation events by providing effective ticketing information and advice; and proactively managing inventory, ticket agents and allocations.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
[PIAS] - BUSINESS AFFAIRS MANAGER (LONDON)
[PIAS] Entertainment Group is looking for an experienced lawyer to join their UK legal team at their head office in Bermondsey. The role will take primary responsibility for [PIAS] Artist and Label Services division, but will also have significant involvement in all other legal areas of the business to include [PIAS] Co-operative and its roster of partner labels and its own Play It Again Sam label.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
KOBALT LABEL SERVICES - MARKETING CO-ORDINATOR (LONDON)
Kobalt Label Services requires a Marketing Co-ordinator to assist the UK and International Marketing teams at KLS, as well as support the MD for KLS in the running of day to day activities within the KLS marketing team. The candidate will report to KLS MD but will get direction day to day from the VP, International Marketing, as well as the Head of UK Marketing for KLS.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
MAMA & COMPANY - GENERAL MANAGER, LIVERPOOL ARTS CLUB (LIVERPOOL)
This is a fantastic opportunity to work and grow with an exciting company that owns some of the UK’s most established venues. To manage the venue both efficiently and effectively ensuring that the diary is commercially maximised and all statutory duties are discharged. To effectively manage the kitchen and restaurant operation, ensuring GP is maintained and customer satisfaction is the primary focus.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
SJM CONCERTS - DEPUTY MARKETING MANAGER (MANCHESTER)
SJM Concerts seeks a Deputy Marketing Manager to support our marketing team to maximise exposure of events promoted by the company, and to implement marketing campaigns to generate sales for new tours and events via various platforms including press, radio, TV, digital and print.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
SUPAPASS - ARTIST/LABEL RELATIONS AND BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT EXECUTIVE (LONDON OR NORWICH)
SupaPass is an exciting new digital music platform connecting superfans with their favourite bands. SupaPass gives labels and artists a smart way to monetise their digital content, unlocking new revenue streams and amplifying superfan loyalty by bringing everything essential from social to streaming in one place. We are seeking an ambitious and driven artist/label relations and business development executive with a deep understanding and strong network across music, entertainment and music-tech.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
DOMINO - WAREHOUSE MANAGER (LONDON)
We are looking for a bright, energetic warehouse manager with plenty of enthusiasm to supervise our warehouse operation.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
MANAGEMENT ASSISTANT (LONDON)
Experienced Management Assistant required for established London based artist management company. Candidates must have relevant experience in all areas of artist management and must demonstrate their knowledge and experience in assisting with a global release and live campaign. Role will include providing support to artist managers, co-ordinating day to day activities for artists including general administrative duties and personal assistant duties.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
 
   
DOMINO - UK DIGITAL MARKETING MANAGER (LONDON)
Domino is seeking a UK Digital Manager to work alongside our Digital and Project Management departments. The ideal candidate will take full responsibility for defining and implementing digital marketing strategy and will evaluate and communicate ongoing campaign effectiveness. Extending the reach and engagement of our marketing campaigns with creative ideas is key.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
 
CMU Jobs is a proven way to recruit the best music business talent for roles across the industry at all levels, from graduate to senior management. To book an ad contact Sam on 020 7099 9060 or email ads@unlimitedmedia.co.uk
 

The Hub presents results of #VoteForMusic campaign at CMU Insights @ The Great Escape
Day two of CMU Insights @ The Great Escape kicked off this morning with the #VoteForMusic keynote, which saw TGE co-founder Martin Elbourne, Cooking Vinyl's Martin Goldschmidt, Yellowbrick Music's Meredith Cork and Dan Le Sac delivering speeches outlining what they would like the new government to do for music and the music industry.

Also presented were the results of a previously reported pre-election survey carried out by music development organisation The Hub, which asked the wider music community what music-related issues they would like the new government to tackle. And the top priority for David Cameron and his buddies, the survey found, are: music education, live music funding, tax reliefs and investment, and rules stopping a single noise complaint from closing down venues.

Or, more specifically:

• Re-introduce music as a mandatory part of the school curriculum and to not cut central government funding for music education.

• Protect funding for live music, particularly at a grassroots level, to help underpin the UK's position as a major player in the global music market, and the economic contribution music makes to the UK economy.

• Introduce into law the 'agent of change' principle, meaning that music venues would no longer have to spend thousands of pounds fighting off noise complaints, abatement notices and planning applications.

• Introduce new tax reliefs to the wider music industry, and either cut VAT on ticket sales or re-invest in the sector the VAT received on these.

Speaking about the campaign, The Hub's Director Julia Payne said: "#VoteForMusic did what it said on the tin, giving music fans, musicians and other industry professionals - real people, who care about music - the chance to tell the new government what measures they want them to take to support the UK's music sector. People have spoken, and the results we hope will help inform what the government chooses to prioritise as it makes its spending plans and looks at its legislative timetable".

Great Escape Director Kat Morris added: "The Great Escape spotlights great new music from the UK. We know that the music industry contributed £3.8 billion to the UK economy last year, and just looking at the new artists playing the festival, we know that the future is looking good too. But we need a framework, and that's where government can help. That's why we backed #VoteForMusic; it gave fans, musicians and others in music a chance to have their say".

The debate will continue with a Hub-hosted event at Cecil Sharp House in London on 1 Jul, which will see Arts Council Chair Peter Bazalgette and representatives of the music industry discuss the results of the #VoteForMusic survey with senior Conservative and Labour politicians. Find out more about how you can attend here.

BMI wins Pandora royalties case, streaming service to appeal
Having finally had a set back in its bid to cut royalty payments, Pandora has said that it will appeal a court ruling ordering it to increase royalty payments to US collecting society BMI from 1.75% to 2.5%.

As previously reported, American performing rights organisation BMI sued Pandora in its ongoing royalty dispute with the digital service back in 2013 and the case finally reached court in February this year. Ironically, by that time Pandora was busy elsewhere in its portfolio of music industry litigation attempting to stop the big publishers withdrawing their digital rights from societies like BMI and do direct deals with the streaming service.

But it was provisional negotiations between Pandora and Sony/ATV - before the courts said the publisher couldn't just pull digital from collective licensing - which BMI used to claim that the current 1.75% royalty rate it is receiving undervalued its catalogue. And yesterday a judge agreed, stating the 2.5% was "reasonable, and indeed at the low end of the range of fees of recent licenses".

In a statement, BMI CEO Mike O'Neill said: "Today is an important day for BMI and a huge victory for the more than 650,000 songwriters, composers and publishers we have the privilege to represent. After a nearly two-year legal battle over the value of the BMI repertoire to the Pandora digital music service, the Rate Court ruled resoundingly in BMI's favour".

"The decision also establishes that existing marketplace agreements can be taken into account when determining rates, a key factor for us, and the industry", he continued. "This is an important step forward in valuing music in the digital age".

Although this is a significant out for BMI, and Pandora is already planning to appeal, the final result of the case may only be shortlived. If the US government does overhaul the consent decrees that regulate BMI and ASCAP's collective licensing in the way the publishers want, that will open up a much more flexible system for rightsholders anyway.

How the global music market is changing
As part of the 'Music Licensing: Explained At Last!' strand at CMU Insights @ The Great Escape, the IFPI's Alex Jacob presented a guide to the organisation's global music industry figures for 2014.

Here are five interesting points we took away from his presentation:

1. The enduring physical market

In 2014, digital revenues matched physical sales globally for the first time, increasing by 6.9%, driven by subscription revenues (+39%) and ad-supported revenues (+38.6%). However, physical remains the dominant format for music in a number of markets:
Japan (78%)
Poland (71%)
Germany (70%)
Austria (65%)
South Africa (62%)
France (57%)

2. The vinyl revival?

The growth in sales of vinyl has been a big topic in the music industry and the media in the last few years, with revenues increasing 54.7% last year. However, it remains a niche product, making up just 2% of the global market.

3. The changing digital market

Download sales declined by 8% in 2014, compared to a 2% fall in 2013. They still account for 52% of digital revenues. However, streaming revenues have overtaken download sales in 37 markets. Music subscription services are now worth $1.57 billion, some 23% of the global digital market.

Ad-supported streaming services revenue growth accelerated from 16.6% in 2013 to 38.6% in 2014 and are worth $641 million.

4. Emerging markets to watch

For the last 30 years, the industry made 80% of its revenues in ten countries...
that is set to change.

Brazil (+2%) and South Korea (+19.2%) are both top ten global markets. The industry believes China, India and Russia have the potential to be top ten markets in the future. There is strong digital growth in many smaller markets such as Argentina (67.7%), Colombia (+94.9%), Indonesia (+129%), Peru (+96.5%), South Africa (+61.5%) and Venezuela (+272.8%)

5. The future

The recording industry has stabilised after years of decline, but still has to achieve sustainable growth. Record companies have transformed their business models and offer music in a portfolio of formats. We are still in the early stages of building a mass market around music subscription and streaming. The industry's revenue base is coming from a wider pool of countries as digital helps light up new markets.

Read more coverage of CMU Insights @ The Great Escape on our special microsite here.

Brands increasingly asking for cut of publishing rights on ad sync music
Much of yesterday's 'How To Sell Out Gracefully: Better Brand Partnerships' strand at The Great Escape looked at positive ways in which music and brands can and are working together. However, the 'How Sync Deals Work' panel brought up one worrying trend - that of brands demanding a cut of the copyrights in music they feature in their advertising.

"Brands are starting to get really savvy about publishing rights", said Nathalie Du Bois CEO at 6 Degrees Entertainment. "They're realising that there are all these royalties that they're missing out on. And that's a really scary proposition because they're starting to say that they want to own the publishing. That's where the industry is starting to go".

Highlighting the potential pitfalls of assigning your rights to parties who may not then exploit them as you wish them to, Sentric Music's Simon Pursehouse added: "Getting the right people to work on your behalf is really important, and you need to be careful what you agree to. I know an artist who was offered a deal by a guy who said he could get him a really great sync in the US, but in return he wanted 50% of the rights in perpetuity. The artist naively agreed, thinking it sounded great, but the sync never came off. It was one of the worst deals I've ever seen in paper".

Read more coverage of CMU Insights @ The Great Escape on our special microsite here.

--------------------------------------------------

What to do when an advert rips off your music
The final session of yesterday's 'How To Sell Out Gracefully: Better Brand Partnerships' strand at The Great Escape switched from looking at how bands and brands can work better together to what happens when things go wrong, in a discussion titled 'When Brands Rip You Off'.

The issue of soundalike songs appearing in adverts, either because use of the original was refused or it was deemed to be too expensive, is one that occurs fairly regularly. Jay Barbour of Quest Management, said that he'd seen "four or five" cases of this for his artists alone in recent years. Noting that there are "a lot under the radar that get settled out of court".

Putting into context how something like this can happen, Bella Union's Simon Raymonde outlined an instance of one of the bands signed to his label having a soundalike song appear in an advert.

"In this case, the script to the advert had been written around the song that was yet to be released", explained Raymonde. "The band didn't approve the advert, as they didn't feel that this was the right way to present a brand new song that nobody had heard yet, and the visual representation was not right. The song was about not being able to look after somebody, and the script was the opposite of that. The band weren't comfortable with that".

He continued: "The agency said, 'This is the only song we want. Can we talk to them, fly them over?' In the end, we had to say that it was just a no. It was a very firm no. I didn't hear it for a couple of weeks until I was home one night watching TV and this ad came on and I thought 'Fuck they've used it'. They actually hadn't, but it was damn near it. The melody was very similar, the lyrics were very slightly changed".

Acting quickly, Raymonde called a musicologist to confirm that the song could be seen as a rip-off by a judge. "I told him the whole story and he said, 'Look, I'm going to have to stop you there, I'm already representing the other side'. Which made it all the more stinking".

"There are only a handful of musicologists in this country", explained lawyer Tahir Basheer. "So what brands will sometimes do is approach all of them to get an opinion, which puts them all in a position of conflict of interest".

But how do you go about fighting back? "Always go the legal route", said Barbour, noting that "these sort of things don't have in brand relationships, it seems they're always advertising related".

"If somebody approaches you about licensing a song and you say no straight away, that protects you later down the line", added Basheer. "If you start negotiating and then pull out, later down the line that may limit your claim. The judge may say, 'Well this was just about money'".

While the panel all agreed that it was important to take legal action if an artist believes their music has been ripped off, it can be a costly process fighting a big company in this way, particularly if you're a small band. But coupling this with good PR can aid your situation.

"The bottom line is that you've got to assemble a team from point A", said PR expert Mark Borkowski. "And there's going to be a committed strategy and long term campaign of how you're going to fight back. Where a brand might think they have highly involved customers who buy into them, they don't. Not like an artist does with their fans".

"Ultimately, depending what the brand is, nobody on the corporate side wants negative publicity", he continued. "Trust is a thing they struggle to build. It is expensive, but the tools you have in order to be the David against Goliath is as never before. You've got to build a campaign and a fight to create as much embarrassment as possible. The more that you can do that, the deeper the scar is for someone to get fired".

"In that scenario, you're looking at pressure points", said Basheer. "In court, it's often not a level playing field. You can try to level the playing field with PR. But you do have to be careful, because part of that can lead to issues around defamation. If they lose market share as a result and you're wrong, that causes issues".

Borkowski continued: "If you were to go out on your own and be more maverick in seeking revenge and you haven't got a strong legal mind behind you to check each move, you're going to get caught. You have to find pressure point. Activate your fanbase. Go deep, do research. There may be someone at that company who's more sensitive to the stock price of their company, who doesn't know this is happening. If you can find them, you can get some traction very quickly".

"I think things are getting better", Basheer also noted. "A lot of this comes down to what incentivises people. A lot of the time, it's not the brand, it's the agency between them. Sometimes there are slips - people aren't aware what rights need to be cleared. If there's risk attached, the less people are likely to use stuff. The licensing industry is increasingly becoming an important industry, and there's business to be done there. Brands recognise that, the industry recognises that".

Read more coverage of CMU Insights @ The Great Escape on our special microsite here.

--------------------------------------------------

Five steps to better brand partnerships
In 1960, Elvis' first performance after he returned from Army service was a televised collaboration with Frank Sinatra, which saw the two singers duet together on each other's songs. That event was created as a partnership with Timex.

Kicking off the 'How To Sell Out Gracefully: Better Brand Partnerships' strand at CMU Insights @ The Great Escape, Marc Robinson, MD of Universal's partnerships division, and Jack Fryer, Head Of Insight at Universal Music, imagined that Elvis, Frank and Timex were being brought together in 2015 to show how such deals are done in the modern music industry.

Here are five things we learned about how Globe and Universal ensure that both artists and brands get the best out of their alliances.

1. It's not about selling out anymore

The music industry has changed, and where artists' income comes from is perhaps not as clear as it once was. Whereas there may have been a time where placing a song in an advert or endorsing a product would be a quick cash grab in the past - an added extra more than anything else - partnerships are now about ensuring that both artist and brand get something mutually beneficial out of coming together.

"Brand partnerships aren't about selling out anymore", said Robinson. "It's about how you can connect to create something that music fans really want. By working together, we deliver better work for our artists, and the brands get something that makes them keep coming back for more".

"First, we are nothing without great musical talent. The power of music will never be fully understood. Nor should it be. Secondly, the role of partnership is not to be the saviour of the music industry, it's an additional stream. And third, music and brands are separate. No two bands are the same, not two brands are the same. The key is understanding each other's priorities".

2. Data feeds, rather than leads the conversation

Analytic data is a key driver behind brand partnerships in 2015, but this does not supersede the human instinct that a partnership is the right thing for both artist and brand.

"When talking about data, it's easy to assume it's just the ones and zeros. But I'm talking about a far more human thing. I'm talking about qualitative, ethnographic, and attitudinal information", said Fryer. "There's a conversation between data and instinct. It's not about being led by data, it's about creating data".

"We've done research into what makes Frank fans tick. Who are Frank fans? What's Frank-ness really about? We're a smarter business now. Our artists do have huge data sets around them. That's very powerful. We know we can deliver granular focus for the people we want to speak to for Timex. If you begin to mash up the data, that becomes even more powerful".

3. You need to lay the groundwork

"Research can be incredibly stimulating for creative people", explained Fryer. "When presented right it can be a great creative launchpad. It tells a story that's right for Frank, right for Elvis, and right for Timex".

Using research from numerous sources, Universal has built an app which "tries to quantify the alignment of a brand and artist", which from the start can inform how well the partnership is working and how it can be improved.

"One of the things we're trying to do more of and are getting better at is building a framework right from the start. We work out right at the beginning of the campaign a way of measuring how well this partnership's performing. It's not about detracting from the magic, it's about sharpening the magic".

4. This data and research bolsters gut instinct

When Elvis' manager Colonel Tom Parker approached Timex and Frank Sinatra about their partnership, his aim was to try to reconnect the singer with an older audience.

"He was concerned that Elvis was going to be outflanked by new wave of teen popstars", explained Fryer. "Parker, folklore has it, persuaded Frank to do the duet. We can now ensure that Parker makes the best possible call in choosing the right songs".

"We can look at demographic data and see why songs resonate with which Elvis fans. We've got big data coming from partners like Spotify. Combining this with other data we can create pathways and connections around the people that listen to Frank's music. Parker just has his gut to go on. We can now add our data to the conversation. It's about sharpening it, and making a better conversation".

5. Social media is key

Of all the channels through which an artist and a brand can broadcast their alliance, social media is currently the most powerful.

"Social media is the most powerful marketing platform of all the artist channels", said Fryer. "Timex may have their own good social media channel too. The joy of the hashtag is that you can own a conversation without having one specific channel".

Read more coverage of CMU Insights @ The Great Escape on our special microsite here.

Yellowbrick Music's Meredith Cork calls on government to offer more financial support for musicians
As part of this morning's #VoteForMusic keynote at CMU Insights @ The Great Escape, Yellowbrick Music's Meredith Cork called upon the new Conservative government to provide more financial support to creative people and the creative industries, to support the growth of a stronger industry.

We are all here because of music. This is the common thread that has drawn us all together this morning.

Even if we are not involved in the business of making or selling music, we are clearly all associated by music one way or another. Music helps define who we are. To ourselves, perhaps who we are to our closest friends and then to groups in general - maybe not so much mixtapes, or browsing the CD or vinyl collection as an ice breaker at parties - but perhaps by streaming playlists we have created and then asking not to be judged if the odd guilty pleasure rears its poptastic head.

Danny Boyle's Olympics opening ceremony could not have expressed the importance of music to this country more clearly. Music defines not only us, but our cultures and our generations. It is a very essential part of all of our lives. It is also a business that has given birth to myriad other crafts and businesses - illustrators, film makers, photographers, clothing designers, promoters and so on the list is endless - many careers have been defined by the advent of music and risk being lost in its demise.

Making and selling music is still however, fundamentally, the root of what the business really is all about and what we are here today to consider. What do we need to do to survive?

The need to buy music or to actually 'own' music is fast becoming a distant memory - unless of course we have lucked upon something rare and collectable. I will come back to that further on.

So is the business a dying art because of this?

No. Possibly the opposite is true - but it does need help from our government during this period of change.

Harking back to the theory of Darwinism - those who adapt better to change will survive.
Those full hearted, fierce self-believers will - it's what we do.

The big ships of business are always slow to turn. But the business is global, it truly should be a simple one that seems to have been made very complicated over time. As I think Chris Cooke noted at The Great Escape convention last year - artists quite simply make music, find fans and then sell it to them.

Everything else just seems to have stepped in the way of this process.

OK, so the 'sell it to them' bit now is tricky and streaming seems to be setting itself up as the 'new era' of music consumption and punters are not buying as much music. The argument of correct share of income reaching the artist from streaming - companies such as Spotify / premium v freemium - is a huge battle, with great obfuscation by labels and issues of conflicted interests. Artists are now suing labels based on old deals that have been reneged upon and so on.

That said, even when the consumer did buy music, what percentage of that income actually really made it back to the artist even then? Unless of course the band were massive or it was a joint venture deal - those deals are few and far between. We were fortunate enough to have been able to cut a deal like that with the band Garbage.

But, by the time the label's approximate 85% has been deducted, the producers have had their percentage, and any recoupable costs have been deducted what really is left? Not much, if anything at all. Sure there is an advance, but over the years these have generally become smaller and smaller and mostly sucked up by business.

So publishing, income and gigs - and of course selling stuff to our fans.

Here's the good news. The direct-to-fan market now is massive. It covers every possible area you can think of. Direct engagement with your fan - and no more middle-man taking 85%! The artist also owns the copyright.

I was shown an app recently that actually lets you throw it out to your fans that you are looking for a gaming partner - the artists can then actually share their screen and play a game online with a fan... and if it all gets a bit dull, you can Graham Norton them, drop the lever and throw them off, bringing in the next fan. Engaging with your fanbase, crowdfunding is now putting the control directly back into the hands of the artist and their team. No longer dealing with the excuse of a jammed release schedule at the label, the mercy of an A&R guy who has been let go, the release of first single tanking and the album consequentially being shelved - perhaps with all these changes there is something to truly applaud?

These relationships with fans are priceless. Of course they need to be well managed and carefully directed - but these are the same fans as in my generation who stayed awake until midnight to hear 'Brown Sugar' by The Stones being released around the world at the same time (I was only ten, OK?) just closer up and a whole lot more personal. The opportunity to sell limited and rare items is now possible to fans that really do care and want to be a part of the journey. The ability to sell work and create communities globally with the aid of the internet and social media. The opportunity to have multiple markets operating at the same time.

Sync deals can also be more easily struck without the hindrance of a label - clearances are faster and easier.

But getting to first base does cost money. There is no denying that. Artwork, press, pluggers - there is only so much you can do yourself and people simply cannot live on air.

The people working in this sector, sure work harder for less and with so much passion than in any other commercial sector - I am sure you ALL will vouch for that one.

The entertainment business is a massive self-employment and small business sector in the UK - and when one is lucky enough to strike gold, it takes an age for any income stream to filter through and then boom! No matter how clever you are you are, you are taxed at the highest rate possible - your income is not amortised out over the ten years of hard graft (even though you scraped by paying staff and making ends just meet) and generally where you had to survive on faith and hope alone, snuggled up with the odd tin of baked beans perhaps - along with the loyal support of wealthier buddies who believed in you and shared that journey along the way with the supply of food and the odd cocktail.

So, let's push for a more balanced tax scheme that works for artists, producers and their managers - create a fairer platform that truly understands the peaks and the troughs of this business. A possible solution would be to also permit companies to easily offset some of the tax back into their own company as further investment into other artists, without complex schemes?

Let's create a fund for artists to have an opportunity to obtain small grants that help them on their way - a broader version of The PRS Momentum fund or a reflection of the Canadian scheme, Factor. Where checklists need to be met and certain criteria have to be reached, but with as little red tape as possible. These funds can also help pay for producers who are gifted with the art of recording the songs, pay for artists who create the artwork, promotion and press teams and so on.

Let's push for the government to give the businesses that take on the budding talent pool of today - whether it be in press, radio, marketing, engineering, and so on - some decent financial support, rewarding those companies that spend hours and days training these future business people.

Instead of making it harder by legislating that they cannot intern for free, please help cover the cost of this education. Instead of interning, perhaps this could be viewed as an apprenticeship in one of UK's most valuable invisible exports.

This government needs to put money back into the business and help these artists and all their affiliated teams succeed in the global market and not be invisible!

Read more coverage of CMU Insights @ The Great Escape, including later today the other #VoteForMusic speeches, on our special microsite here.

--------------------------------------------------

Dan Le Sac: An open letter to David Cameron
As part of this morning's #VoteForMusic keynote at CMU Insights @ The Great Escape, Dan Le Sac delivered the following plea to David Cameron and the new Conservative government on behalf of musicians.

Dear Dave,

Do you mind if I call you Dave? When I see you getting all pumped up, with no tie and sleeves rolled up, you certainly look like a Dave.

And before I forget, I must say well done on your election victory. It must feel great to be free from those tyrannical Lib Dems tying you to the centre ground. It must have been a nightmare them holding you back.

I hope I'm not being too forward either, but I'm a musician and wanted to ask a favour, if you don't mind. I honestly think you could help the music community grow in strength, diversity and creativity.

You see, there is a problem that creators of all stripes face. It's the problem of contentment. Contentment is a warm security blanket swaddling us, yet the tighter it wraps somehow it smoothers our creativity.

So what I want to ask is simple. Just get to work and do everything you've been planning to do...

Let Michael Gove strip away our Human Rights.

Let the 1922 Committee push you into dragging us out of the EU.

If Nicky Morgan could flip-flop on Gay marriage again, that would be appreciated.

Let John Whittingdale dismantle our BBC, because we clearly don't need the nearest thing we have to balanced news.

Make sure the poorest in our society stay there, give them more bedroom tax and food banks.

Abolish maternity pay.

Slash the disability living allowance.

And make sure you kill all those ridiculous foxes in the most preposterous way you can think of. They are red, after all.

Curb freedom of speech in the name of National Security.

Remember to push through TTIP.

Don't forget to ignore the 63% of voters who didn't put a cross in a Tory box.

Protect that electoral system which leaves millions of voices unheard.

And have you ever thought of privatising the NHS?

Oh and forget about those pesky SNP MPs and their "mandate for Scotland", what country wouldn't want to be governed by career politicians 350 miles away.

And if you could fix it for Iain Duncan-Smith to chuck a disabled veteran out of a wheelchair on 'Britain's Got Talent', that would be a great help as well. You know he wants to anyway, so why not let him have his fun?

Basically, I'm asking you to make us angry. You said you want to govern one nation. Well, unify us in hatred towards you, one nation against the blue. Put the fire in our bellies to create beautiful things.

Now, I know this is a big ask, you'll be taking huge risk that those votes you bought with fear last week might push back and look for fairness, compassion, altruism and equality in the arms of another party. It's also a risk that the Left might renew and refocus against good ole Tory you, but a generation of passionate, powerful new noise is a risk worth taking, no?

All that said, I may well be preaching to the choir here. You look like you're on top of this already, without me having to ask.

Yours hopefully,

Daniel Stephens

Read more coverage of CMU Insights @ The Great Escape, including later today the other #VoteForMusic speeches, on our special microsite here.

  Vigsy's Club Tip: The Date at Plan B London
New York's Johnny D has had a fair impact on house history as owner of the Henry Street label. This Saturday he's DJing at Plan B launching the '20 Years Of Henry Street' compo next week on BBE with some proper classics, including The Bucketheads' 'The Bomb', Ashley Beedle & Phil Asher's 'Sunrize', Armand Van Helden's 'Hey Baby'.

If you're looking for that quality vibe that came out of the mid 90s house then Johnny D'Mairo will be delivering the goods down in Brixton. He'll be accompanied by a rather big hitter, the highly rated soulful house Yoruban DJ extraordinaire Osunlade. Check the classic 'Blackman' from his seminal 2001 'Paradigm' album.

Also on the bill is homegrown talent from Soulsonic's Stuart Paterson and Greg Wilson to boot. A big line-up.

Saturday 16 May, Plan B, 418 Brixton Road, London, SW9 7AY, 10pm-6am, £10. More info here.

CLICK HERE to read and share online
 

BB King dies
Blues guitarist BB King has died, aged 89. He was recently admitted to hospital for issues related to diabetes and high blood pressure. Two weeks ago, it was announced on his website that he had been placed in hospice care.

The musician's lawyer Brent Bryson confirmed his death to the Associated Press, saying that he had passed away in his sleep yesterday evening.

Born in 1925, King began his recording career in 1949, going on to become one of the biggest names in R&B in the 50s. He later reached new audiences as the support act for The Rolling Stones on their 1969 US tour, and when he collaborated with U2 on 1988 single 'When Love Comes To town, and remained an influential figure throughout his lifetime.

CMU Beef Of The Week #254: Iran v Thom Yorke
Who do you think about when you think about sexual problems? Thom Yorke, right? I know, every time. It's like, you're sitting there thinking about erectile dysfunction of an evening, and then suddenly there he is. I mean, to be fair, this gif does pop into my head roughly every six seconds, but that's by the by.

Anyway, I don't need you to confirm the inner working of my subconscious, because Iran has already done it for me. Yes, Iran. Iran gets me. I don't know why I even talk to you people. Who even are you?

Yeah, so, Iran. Someone in Iran has published a book on sexual problems between married couples. I mean, someone posted a picture on Twitter of it and said that's what it was, and I see no reason not to believe them. I mean, it looks like it's probably a book, and it has writing on the cover that I don't understand - in keeping with books in general. And it has pictures of three men on it. One of whom is Thom Yorke, who, as we have already established, is synonymous with sexual health.

In fact, it seems that Yorke is synonymous with health in general, because another Twitter user posted a picture of a billboard in Russia featuring the same picture of the Radiohead frontman offering to "help you to forget about your headache and insomnia". Good old Thom.

Of course, it's possible that Yorke isn't very happy about this. Sometimes people become the face of something, but it turns out that they'd rather be the face of something else. It is conceivable that Thom Yorke would rather be thought of as 'the biscuit guy', rather than the patron saint of headaches, insomnia and intimacy issues. Which is what he definitely is.

He might also wonder how a photograph of him has come to be used in advertising against his will. I'm going to assume it's against his will, as he hasn't commented. But you have to wonder if there's some ropey stock image service out there with some interesting tagging going on, or if certain search terms in certain languages are a sure-fire route to his face.

We don't know. We may never know. But when he's calmed down (I don't know if he needs to calm down either, but let's assume he does) he should at least take some solace in the fact that he's helping people with his face. By accident. In Iran. In bed.

 
ANDY MALT | Editor
Andy heads up the team, overseeing the CMU bulletin and website, coordinating features and interviews, reporting on artist and business stories, and contributing to the CMU Approved column.
Email andy@unlimitedmedia.co.uk (except press releases, see below)
   
CHRIS COOKE | MD & Business Editor
Chris provides music business coverage and analysis. Chris also leads the CMU Insights training and consultancy business and education programme CMU:DIY, and heads up CMU publisher 3CM UnLimited.
Email chris@unlimitedmedia.co.uk (except press releases, see below)
   
SAM TAYLOR | Commercial Manager & Insights Associate
Sam oversees the commercial side of the CMU media, leading on sales and sponsorship, plus helps manage and deliver the CMU Insights training courses and consultancy services.
Email sam@unlimitedmedia.co.uk or call 020 7099 9060
   
CARO MOSES | Co-Publisher
Caro helps oversee the CMU media, while as a Director of 3CM UnLimited she heads up the company's other two titles ThisWeek London and ThreeWeeks Edinburgh, and supports other parts of the business.
Email caro@unlimitedmedia.co.uk
Send ALL press releases to musicnews@unlimitedmedia.co.uk - this is checked daily by the whole editorial team meaning your release will definitely get to the right person.

For details of the training and consultancy services offered by CMU Insights click here - Andy and Chris are also available to provide music business comment, just email them direct.

To promote your company or advertise jobs or services to the entire UK music industry via the CMU bulletin or website contact Sam on 020 7099 9060 or email ads@unlimitedmedia.co.uk
© UnLimited Media, a division of 3CM Enterprises Ltd

CMU, UnLimited Media, Kemp House, 152 City Road, London EC1V 2NX
t: 020 7099 9050 (editorial) 020 7099 9060 (sales)

publishing@unlimitedmedia.co.uk | complaints@unlimitedmedia.co.uk