MONDAY 18 MAY 2015
TODAY'S TOP STORY: The all new Grooveshark has been taken down already. Twice. Possibly three times by the time you read this. As previously reported, the original Grooveshark, a thorn in the side of the music industry for many years, finally went offline at the end of last month, as long-running legal battles between the record companies and the streaming start-up began to fall in... [READ MORE]
 
TODAY'S APPROVED: Fronted by Trash Kit's Rachel Aggs, Shopping provided the perfect Friday night boost in the grand Paganini Ballroom at The Great Escape last week. Channelling The Slits, Gang Of Four and a bit of highlife, and thanks to Aggs' distinct guitar and vocal styles, they're not entirely dissimilar in sound to Trash Kit. Which is by no means a complaint - there's definitely a dividing... [READ MORE]
TOP STORIES All new Grooveshark taken down, twice and counting
The Great Escape's tenth anniversary goes out with a bang (and then lots of confetti)
JUMP | ONLINE
LEGAL Band agreements: How and why a self-releasing act should write one
JUMP | ONLINE
LIVE BUSINESS Attitude Is Everything reveals impact of its Charter Of Best Practice on ticket sales
Festival Republic to launch new music festival in Shoreditch
JUMP | ONLINE
MARKETING & PR How streaming is changing music marketing
JUMP | ONLINE
DIGITAL & D2F SERVICES Spotify not limiting freemium to three months
JUMP | ONLINE
THE GREAT ESCAPE Martin Elbourne on how government can support music at a local level
Martin Goldschmidt calls on government to provide tax breaks for music
JUMP | ONLINE
ARTIST NEWS Five tips for getting the most out of studio recordings as an emerging artist
JUMP | ONLINE
AND FINALLY... West muted once again at Billboard awards
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Click JUMP to skip direct to a section of this email or ONLINE to read and share stories on the CMU website (JUMP option may not work in all email readers). For regular updates from Team CMU follow us on Twitter, Facebook or Tumblr.
 
 
ELITE MUSIC MANAGEMENT - BOOKING AGENT & ASSISTANT BOOKING AGENT (BRIGHTON)
Since 1999, Brighton based Elite Music Management has represented breakthrough DJs, producers and label parties. We are looking for two dynamic, talented individuals to work as part of a hard-working team. You will be required to promote a roster of acts, and manage their worldwide tour diaries. You will liaise with artists, managers and promoters on a daily basis.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
UNDER THE BRIDGE - ACTING GENERAL MANAGER (LONDON)
We require an Acting General Manager to manage and deliver the content of events at Under the Bridge including corporate events, private events, showcases, public music events and match days. To ensure the smooth operational running of Under The Bridge.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
LISTEN UP - EVENTS PRESS OFFICER (LONDON)
Listen Up provides a bespoke 360 promotional service offering radio, club, online and print campaigns in the UK and worldwide, consistently delivering results to clients in a diverse range of musical genres. We are hiring an experienced Events Press Officer to join the events team at Listen Up. The candidate will need 3-4 years' experience running print and online events campaigns and will be working across Listen Up’s extensive festival and events roster.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
MAMA & COMPANY - E-MARKETING CO-ORDINATOR (LONDON)
MAMA & Company are looking for an experienced E-marketing Co-ordinator. This is a fantastic opportunity to work and grow with an exciting company who own some of London's most established venues. You will need to have experience of managing email marketing campaigns, database management and analysis, as well as holding high levels of computer literacy. Knowledge of HTML, CSS and Java is essential.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
HOUSE OF 27 – SOCIAL MEDIA INTERNSHIP (PAID) (LONDON)
House of 27 is a UK digital PR company representing both development and established artists across unsigned, independent label and major record label setups. We require an intern to support our small, friendly team in our daily work environment. An additional interest in A&R and scouting new bands would be ideal, but passion for new music and enthusiasm for digital is a must.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
DOMINO RECORDING CO - DIGITAL OPERATIONS MANAGER (LONDON)
Domino Recording Co is seeking a high calibre individual to oversee its digital operations processes, based in the London office. This full-time position will be responsible for managing direct global operations relationships across digital music partners (eg iTunes, Spotify, Google Play, Millward Brown), and ongoing management of the digital catalogue across the label.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
LIVE NATION - EVENT TICKETING MANAGER (LONDON)
Live Nation requires an Event Ticketing Manager to maximise ticket sales for Live Nation events by providing effective ticketing information and advice; and proactively managing inventory, ticket agents and allocations.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
[PIAS] - BUSINESS AFFAIRS MANAGER (LONDON)
[PIAS] Entertainment Group is looking for an experienced lawyer to join their UK legal team at their head office in Bermondsey. The role will take primary responsibility for [PIAS] Artist and Label Services division, but will also have significant involvement in all other legal areas of the business to include [PIAS] Co-operative and its roster of partner labels and its own Play It Again Sam label.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
KOBALT LABEL SERVICES - MARKETING CO-ORDINATOR (LONDON)
Kobalt Label Services requires a Marketing Co-ordinator to assist the UK and International Marketing teams at KLS, as well as support the MD for KLS in the running of day to day activities within the KLS marketing team. The candidate will report to KLS MD but will get direction day to day from the VP, International Marketing, as well as the Head of UK Marketing for KLS.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
MAMA & COMPANY - GENERAL MANAGER, LIVERPOOL ARTS CLUB (LIVERPOOL)
This is a fantastic opportunity to work and grow with an exciting company that owns some of the UK’s most established venues. To manage the venue both efficiently and effectively ensuring that the diary is commercially maximised and all statutory duties are discharged. To effectively manage the kitchen and restaurant operation, ensuring GP is maintained and customer satisfaction is the primary focus.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
SJM CONCERTS - DEPUTY MARKETING MANAGER (MANCHESTER)
SJM Concerts seeks a Deputy Marketing Manager to support our marketing team to maximise exposure of events promoted by the company, and to implement marketing campaigns to generate sales for new tours and events via various platforms including press, radio, TV, digital and print.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
SUPAPASS - ARTIST/LABEL RELATIONS AND BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT EXECUTIVE (LONDON OR NORWICH)
SupaPass is an exciting new digital music platform connecting superfans with their favourite bands. SupaPass gives labels and artists a smart way to monetise their digital content, unlocking new revenue streams and amplifying superfan loyalty by bringing everything essential from social to streaming in one place. We are seeking an ambitious and driven artist/label relations and business development executive with a deep understanding and strong network across music, entertainment and music-tech.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
DOMINO - WAREHOUSE MANAGER (LONDON)
We are looking for a bright, energetic warehouse manager with plenty of enthusiasm to supervise our warehouse operation.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
MANAGEMENT ASSISTANT (LONDON)
Experienced Management Assistant required for established London based artist management company. Candidates must have relevant experience in all areas of artist management and must demonstrate their knowledge and experience in assisting with a global release and live campaign. Role will include providing support to artist managers, co-ordinating day to day activities for artists including general administrative duties and personal assistant duties.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
 
   
DOMINO - UK DIGITAL MARKETING MANAGER (LONDON)
Domino is seeking a UK Digital Manager to work alongside our Digital and Project Management departments. The ideal candidate will take full responsibility for defining and implementing digital marketing strategy and will evaluate and communicate ongoing campaign effectiveness. Extending the reach and engagement of our marketing campaigns with creative ideas is key.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
 
CMU Jobs is a proven way to recruit the best music business talent for roles across the industry at all levels, from graduate to senior management. To book an ad contact Sam on 020 7099 9060 or email ads@unlimitedmedia.co.uk
 

All new Grooveshark taken down, twice and counting
The all new Grooveshark has been taken down already. Twice. Possibly three times by the time you read this.

As previously reported, the original Grooveshark, a thorn in the side of the music industry for many years, finally went offline at the end of last month, as long-running legal battles between the record companies and the streaming start-up began to fall in the former's favour. Founders of the digital firm became panicked about the size of damages they could be ordered to pay by the courts, so they reached a deal with the labels, shut their company down and apologised big time.

But almost immediately a clone of the service went live at another domain - grooveshark.io - seemingly the result of an anonymous figure called Shark, supposedly a former affiliate of the always controversial streaming platform, having backed up the majority of the now defunct site before it went down.

Though, as Torrentfreak pointed out, while Grooveshark v2 might have used the original service's branding, and may have boasted a bulk of the dead streaming site's catalogue, it wasn't actually a straight copy of the recently deceased streaming platform. Rather, it was more of an MP3 search service akin to (and possibly copied from) MP3juices.se.

But either way, the music industry's legal people seemingly got to business with immediate effect, because last week the new Grooveshark site was taken down too, it's domain name seized in what the aforementioned Shark called a "brutal takeover" (his earlier ripping of an existing website and all its illegal content having been decidedly unbrutal, presumably).

Speaking to Music Week, Shark blamed the speedy takedown on "those who have the 'dough' [to] control the world". But he insisted he wasn't beaten, and sure enough the site soon reappeared at grooveshark.vc. That site too was quickly taken down, though currently there is something going on at grooveshark.li - as a simple Google search will tell you (thus again illustrating the problem with speedy domain takedowns, new sites always reappear and Google helps fans find them).

Concluding, Master Shark told Music Week: "I have one message for those responsible for this hostile take over: 'You will not stop us'. On the contrary. The harder you come at us the stronger we'll fight, and now after this hit we're more determined than ever to keep Grooveshark alive and kicking".

So, that'll be fun.

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The Great Escape's tenth anniversary goes out with a bang (and then lots of confetti)
The Great Escape's tenth anniversary year reached its climax on Saturday night as confetti exploded across a packed house enjoying a special midnight show from The Maccabees, alumni of the festival's very first year back to celebrate its birthday.

The biggest edition of TGE to date, Paul Weller, The Vaccines, Drenge and The Maccabees were all amongst the acts revealed at the very last minute to help celebrate the festival's ten years. Meanwhile across 35 venues over 450 great new artists from all corners of the world played to excitable punters and over 3500 industry delegates.

Those delegates also took part in the TGE Convention and the CMU Insights programme of conference sessions, which saw record numbers of industry players learn and debate about key current trends in the business of music, with the spotlight being put on marketing, licensing, brand partnerships and the artist/label relationship. A great mix of keynotes, presentations, interviews and panels meant CMU Insights @ TGE met its key objective: to explain and educate before we debate.

You can read CMU's coverage so far of our conference strands on the special CMU@TGE microsite, with some of those reports also included in this edition of the CMU Daily. Plus look out for additional reports and podcasts, going live on that site and here in the Daily each day over the coming weeks, as we share all the insights, opinions, tips and views shared during this year's event.

Band agreements: How and why a self-releasing act should write one
As part of the CMU:DIY programme at The Great Escape on Saturday, Scott McKinlay and Aneesh Patel from law firm Harbottle & Lewis gave a presentation on what self-releasing artists should do to ensure that everything is in order legally speaking, both between band members and with the people they work with.

And here are their five tips on how and why to write such an agreement...

1. Why write a band agreement?
You should put in writing key understandings about how you're going to move forward as a band. It's best to do this right at the outset, as things can become more complicated once the money starts rolling in.

2. Sharing the rights
Decide who owns the various rights to the band's output - recordings, artwork, use of the name and any goodwill associated with the act. These could be split equally, or certain things could be owned by specific members of the group - for example, if one of you creates all of the artwork.

3. Dividing up the loot
Once the rights are divided up, decide how you'll split the money - will everything be distributed equally, or will one or more band members get a bigger cut if you decide that they contribute more to the project? For example, one member of the band might do the bulk of the songwriting, or you may have a non-touring member who you decide shouldn't receive any contributions from your touring activity.

4. Access to the cash
You should also agree how often people can take money out of the pot. If you have enough coming in, you may decide that members can access a share each month. Or you may decide to pay yourselves less often, but you should make a decision on how often this is.

5. Quitting or splitting
What happens if someone leaves the group? When do they stop being entitled to any money generated by the group, beyond rights they personally own, such as publishing on any songs they wrote or co-wrote? Try and have a plan in place early on to deal with this eventuality.

Attitude Is Everything reveals impact of its Charter Of Best Practice on ticket sales
Attitude is Everything last week revealed a dramatic rise in the number of deaf and disabled fans attending live music events in the UK, a really positive development enabled by the efforts of some promoters and venues to attract more disabled audience members.

Attitude Is Everything, of course, campaigns for the live music sector to improve accessibility to its events. Having collated ticket sales data from festivals and venues signed to its Charter Of Best Practice, the charity said that 114,000 tickets were sold to disabled fans in 2014, compared to 67,000 in 2013, constituting an increase of 70%. The group added that the direct economic impact of those sales is an estimated £5.4 million.

Attitude Is Everything founder Suzanne Bull told reporters: "It is heartening to see such a strong correlation between the venues and festivals who embrace our Charter Of Best Practice and the numbers of disabled customers coming through their doors".

She goes on: "It also sends out a strong message to the wider music and entertainment industry: there are potentially millions of disabled customers wanting to attend your events and, if you improve access, then they will come. It doesn't have to be expensive and it doesn't have to be difficult. As impressive as these numbers are, they only represent the tip of the iceberg".

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Festival Republic to launch new music festival in Shoreditch
Festival Republic has announced plans to launch a new festival in Shoreditch in November championing new talent, and taking over unusual venues in the London district in a bid to involve the whole local community. Because the festival's called Community, see?

Confirming the new event, Festival Republic MD Melvin Benn told reporters: "This is an urban, multi-venue emerging talent event inspired by our love of the fact that live music just never stops getting better. But we want to present it in the Community; in the butchers and bakers and the basement offices and loft bedrooms as well as some of the more established venues of Shoreditch. It will represent the energy of our musical culture and the innovation of one of the most innovative and vibrant areas in the UK".

Meanwhile Festival Republic's Jon Mcildowie, who is set to curate Community, added: "As promoters but above all music fans we are constantly looking out for new and emerging talent. Community is an opportunity for us to share the music that we are all excited about and to introduce new artists to the public before anyone else. I'm delighted to be working with the Live Nation team to help bring the programme together".

How streaming is changing music marketing
Kicking off the 'Music Marketing Is Broken: Let's Fix It' strand on day two of CMU Insights @ The Great Escape, Spotify's Director Of Label Relations Will Hope delivered a keynote speech on how streaming is changing the way music marketing works.

Here are four points we took away from his presentation:

1. The relationship with fans is changing

"Our biggest problem is that everything that came before no longer applies", said Hope. "All the best practice, the way you set up a release, timelines, everything before was quite short-termist - first week sales, quarterly targets".

"One of the biggest issues we've had at Spotify, when working with labels, is trying to get away from that", he continued. "We're constantly trying to make the old way work for the new and, well, it doesn't really. Labels always focused on unit sales, but that is really just one piece of the puzzle, and trying to judge streaming in the same way doesn't really work. We need to look at success in a different way, and we think that comes down to fans".

Under the old system, one fan would equal one sale, where the value of each fan is the same. In the streaming world, the economic value of each fan varies based on how many times they play a song over a long period of time. Before the aim was just to get more fans, now it's to get more fans and then keep them engaged.

"For us, that means the 60 million music fans on Spotify every day, and that's a massive opportunity. Spotify as a platform allows you to find those fans and keep up engagement", Hope went on. "And that works especially well when we work together".

2. How Spotify approaches artist marketing

"We recognise that the two main things that Spotify can offer is a fanbase, and this more long-term monetisation", said Hope.

Spotify takes three different approaches to the artists the service promotes through its own playlists, dividing them into three categories: Spotlight, Partnership and Superstar.

• Spotlight: Flagship campaigns to develop new artists and find their audience.

• Partnership: Partnering with established artists to reconnect existing fans and grow their audience.

• Superstar: The biggest campaigns to support the biggest artists.

"The main thing is, these are all engaging users over time", Hope explained. "In the past, you just had to engage a user once to gain revenue from them, now you have to repeat it again and again. You use a mix of content, and a mix of marketing tools, and you use it over time".

"We started playlisting Hozier in December 2013 and it's still going on now", said Hope, as an example. "You have to use different pieces of content to keep the users interested - a track, a session, the single, an EP, and the album itself. If you frontload the content, people will get bored, so we try to to structure everything over a longer period".

3. Timeline of a hit

Hope broke down three different types of 'hits' on Spotify, using examples of artists who saw their music gain momentum on the platform from different starting points.

Viral hit (Mura Masa - Love Sick Fuck)
• Track is discovered and saved by early adopters who search for the track and save it to their own playlists.
• Spotify becomes aware of the track and adds it to relevant playlists.
• Spotify playlisting drives discovery.
• New fans share the track with friends.

Spotlight hit (Kygo - Stole The Show)
• Early Spotify playlisting drives saves to user's personal libraries.
• Initial playlisting success drives additional plays and then entry into chart playlist.
• Further playlisting grows audience who share track with friends.

Superstar hit (Mark Ronson & Bruno Mars - Uptown Funk)
• Track already popular with Spotify editors and users.
• Track moves up chart playlist and drives saves to user playlists.
• Track remains a staple in users' libraries and playlists.

4. The power of playlists and personal libraries, and the importance of traditional marketing

"One thing I've noticed in all this is that getting into people's personal music libraries is still really key", said Hope. "Spotify playlists and third party programmed playlists will only become more and more important, but they change a lot. Playlist owners need to keep them fresh. So they're really important for discovery".

"But if the life-cycle of a track, or an album, or an artist is going to be eighteen months to two years, you need your music in users' own playlists, which they're not changing that much - their go-to playlists if they're at the gym, commuting, or whatever it is they're doing".

However, while Spotify itself can boost a track through various means, and further momentum around buzz songs as they get playlisted, Hope said traditional artist and label led marketing is still key for initial discovery.

"All these things that are part and parcel of traditional artist marketing, they still have an effect. I guess you just need to change the objectives a little. It's not just about getting fans to spend more today, you're using the campaign as an engagement piece. And you need to build other things you're doing on streaming services like Spotify around that".

But how should that traditional marketing adapt, bearing in mind Hope's insights and comments? This was the topic in the spotlight for much of the rest of the CMU Insights marketing strand - more on which later.

Spotify not limiting freemium to three months
For a brief moment last week there was speculation that a compromise was on the horizon in the much rumoured impasse between Spotify and the majors - and mainly Universal - over the market-leading streaming service's freemium level.

As much previously reported, as Spotify seeks to renew is licensing deal with Universal, it's thought the mega-major has been putting pressure on the digital firm to limit its free-to-access offer, which brings in much lower royalties, and which is arguably so good it is making it hard for other digital start-ups to evolve middle-market streaming set-ups at a lower price point than £10 a month. But Spotify insists that freemium is needed to sign-up premium users, ie the people generating the main growth revenue stream for the record industry today.

So, that's all ongoing, and last week Digital Music News cited various sources as saying a compromise was being negotiated whereby Spotify would offer freemium for just three months for new subscribers, before upselling them to a paid-for option. Which would basically be what most of Spotify's competitors without a freemium level already do, though possibly with a longer sample period. But it doesn't sound like something Spotify would be up for.

And it is not. The streaming service has categorically denied that this is an option being considered. Though some sources say the proposal was made by Universal and Sony, only to be quickly knocked back by Team Spotify.

Martin Elbourne on how government can support music at a local level
In Friday's CMU Daily we shared two of the #VoteForMusic speeches that kickstarted the second day of proceedings at this year's CMU Insights @ The Great Escape. Well, four music people in total addressed the new UK government, and so today we share the other two speeches that were made.

First up, Great Escape founder Martin Elbourne, who spoke about how government can support regional cities by supporting music and musicians at a local level. Here are the key points he made...

I spent a year on and off working for the South Australian government, where my official title was the rather grand Thinker In Residence. My topic was live music, which was pretty much non-existent in southern Australia at the time, and we ended up writing a report with about 40 recommendations, most of which are now being implemented.

The reason they originally set up the project was because a key venue had shut down, basically the only small venue in Adelaide. But Adelaide's problem wasn't really just one venue shutting down - and that venue has now re-opened - though it provided the impetus to review the music community in the city.

What we really focused on was trying to stop talented young people moving away to Melbourne and Sydney. We wanted to find a way to cultivate a buzzing city, by attracting culture and tech companies, something that is very important for government.

A big thing in South Australia was the licensing laws. It was incredibly difficult to set up a new venue. So that was one of the things we addressed to get this process moving.

The day before The Great Escape this year, we staged another one day conference called Music Cities, and even though it was only on sale for two months, we had 50 cities from 20 countries signed up to it. We looked at the impact a thriving local music industry can have on a city, in terms of employment, boosting the economic and social welfare of an area, and keeping talented people within the region.

Music Canada are officially launching their own report on the impact music can have on a regional city at Midem this year, and they gave us some highlights of that work at Music Cities. And a lot of what their report says is very similar to what my findings were in Australia. The benefits - and the way to get them - are often the same worldwide.

These initiatives need to start locally and organically, but wherever a music community is starting to thrive, once the momentum is underway, they need support from government, whether local, regional or national.

At Music Cities the Deputy Mayor of Groningen gave us some advice, let the politicians see our output. He convinced all his local politicians to visit Gronigen's Eurosonic festival, to see first hand how important it is to the town, and they've never questioned helping the event since.

Money is always an issue - but there are other factors too. Small venues closing down is a problem being faced all over the world. So my message to the UK government would be to look at what's being done in cities around the world, and then look at the music communities in our own cities and towns.

Where a music community is growing, help them build a music strategy, support their work and if at all possible put some money in place. The social and economic benefits will then follow.

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Martin Goldschmidt calls on government to provide tax breaks for music
In his #VoteForMusic keynote Cooking Vinyl MD Martin Goldschmidt called on the music industry to lobby the new government for tax breaks to help boost the recorded music industry. Here are his key points...

I want to talk about government providing tax breaks to help the recording industry. At the moment there are a few schemes that can help us release new music - like VCT and ICT schemes. And we as a company have benefited fantastically from them. For example, Ingenious, employing one of those schemes, helped fund our first album with The Prodigy in 2009, which was a huge lift to the company. And then we worked with Icebreaker on The Cranberries, Marilyn Manson, and others.

But those are tax breaks for investors. They do benefit our industry, and I'm not saying we should get rid of them, but why don't we have something that directly benefits the record business, rather than doing so via those private investors and their funds.

The obvious move is to have a tax break on recording itself. There's support for R&D in many other industries - the pharmaceuticals industry, for example - and far closer to home we see tax breaks for film, games, theatre, and there's one coming in for orchestras in April 2016. So you've got big tax breaks in the creative industries. But the one for orchestras specifically excluded rock and pop, because they don't want to give money to Coldplay.

But if you have 25% tax break on recordings, and 50% of the money had to be spent in the UK, that would have so many benefits. It would definitely benefit record companies, but that's a naïve way to look at it. Most of the records we release are funded by the artist and licensed to us, and they would benefit too.

A lot of the tax breaks for other sectors are because they've been hit hard by the internet. But what industry has been hit harder that music? None. And recording studios and session musicians have been hit far harder than labels. It's not just about us record companies. It would help the whole recording industry sector, create jobs and then extend benefits to the wider creative industry.

One of the offshoots of the crisis we've had at record companies, with income down 45%, is that everyone's got far more risk averse. We're not taking as many risks, and some of the more risky stiff is not getting funded. Tax breaks would help us make far better and more culturally diverse music. Stuff where people say "this is crazy" when they first hear it, but then they fall in love with it.

I call on the industry to make the case for tax cuts to the government. And let's get better at speaking to government too. Tax breaks in this country aren't there for music, they're given to financial services. Why? Because they're great at lobbying government. We're good at fighting between ourselves. We need to have one voice, and then go to government to make this happen.

  Approved: Shopping
Fronted by Trash Kit's Rachel Aggs, Shopping provided the perfect Friday night boost in the grand Paganini Ballroom at The Great Escape last week.

Channelling The Slits, Gang Of Four and a bit of highlife, and thanks to Aggs' distinct guitar and vocal styles, they're not entirely dissimilar in sound to Trash Kit. Which is by no means a complaint - there's definitely a dividing line between the two, meaning they complement each other rather than step on each others toes.

Shopping's self-released debut album, originally put out in 2013, received a re-release through FatCat earlier this year, with their second album due out through the same label imminently.

Listen to their debut single, and live highlight, 'In Other Words', here.
CLICK HERE to read and share online
 

Five tips for getting the most out of studio recordings as an emerging artist
Closing his session on recording as a DIY musician during CMU:DIY @ The Great Escape on Saturday, singer-songwriter Chris T-T offered five tips for emerging artists on getting the most out of their recordings with limited resources.

1. Rather than finding an expensive producer, create a producer. If someone is looking to start out in production, suggest working together. If that person turns out to be really talented, you could have an ally for life.

2. Find a college studio. See if you can find a college that's got a big studio that they're willing to let you use for free, perhaps so that students can gain experience. This is probably the only time in your life that you'll get that free studio time.

3. Two-inch reel is a red herring. Whatever anyone tells you, recording to two-inch tape is only worth doing if you're really experienced in recording and your music suits that retro sound. If you really want it, consider recording on modern equipment and then mixing to tape. At the recording stage, you are going to spend so much more time fixing the problems that arise from using old school analogue recording.

4. Always get an instrumental mix. The first thing that happens when someone offers you a sync is they're going to ask to hear the instrumental version of the track. If you don't have that, then you could lose out on that opportunity.

5. Always get the stems. When you've finished in the studio, make sure you ask the engineer to give you the individual recorded parts for your song. That way, you always have the opportunity to get it remixed elsewhere. It will be much harder to try to go back and get those stems later.

West muted once again at Billboard awards
For anyone who missed not being able to hear Kanye West perform his track 'All Day' during his BRITs stint earlier this year, well, good news people, his performance of the track was similarly muted by the ****** ***** and ****** who broadcast yesterday's Billboard Music Awards.

Though given that outcome was entirely predictable, it's not clear why West again chose to do the 'n word' filled song at a mainstream awards event. But, presumably to avoid being accused of just completely rerunning the BRITs debacle for an American audience, BBMA organisers also ensured the stage was fogged in smoke, so this time you couldn't see West either.

Enjoy not seeing and hearing West perform here.

 
ANDY MALT | Editor
Andy heads up the team, overseeing the CMU bulletin and website, coordinating features and interviews, reporting on artist and business stories, and contributing to the CMU Approved column.
Email andy@unlimitedmedia.co.uk (except press releases, see below)
   
CHRIS COOKE | MD & Business Editor
Chris provides music business coverage and analysis. Chris also leads the CMU Insights training and consultancy business and education programme CMU:DIY, and heads up CMU publisher 3CM UnLimited.
Email chris@unlimitedmedia.co.uk (except press releases, see below)
   
SAM TAYLOR | Commercial Manager & Insights Associate
Sam oversees the commercial side of the CMU media, leading on sales and sponsorship, plus helps manage and deliver the CMU Insights training courses and consultancy services.
Email sam@unlimitedmedia.co.uk or call 020 7099 9060
   
CARO MOSES | Co-Publisher
Caro helps oversee the CMU media, while as a Director of 3CM UnLimited she heads up the company's other two titles ThisWeek London and ThreeWeeks Edinburgh, and supports other parts of the business.
Email caro@unlimitedmedia.co.uk
Send ALL press releases to musicnews@unlimitedmedia.co.uk - this is checked daily by the whole editorial team meaning your release will definitely get to the right person.

For details of the training and consultancy services offered by CMU Insights click here - Andy and Chris are also available to provide music business comment, just email them direct.

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