FRIDAY 22 MAY 2015
TODAY'S TOP STORY: Just in case you thought the music industry had gone a whole week without shouting about safe harbours, don't worry, we had a PRS AGM and the Ivors, both prime opportunities for music business representatives to have a grand old moan about tech giants exploiting the intricacies of copyright law to their commercial advantage. As previously reported, the so called safe harbours... [READ MORE]
 
TODAY'S APPROVED: This bank holiday weekend sees Promised Land go old skool with the 'Respect Your History' sessions, featuring Chicago's acid house originator DJ Pierre and 808 State headlining the retro main room. And with a BBQ in the afternoon, plus four other areas playing deep house, drum n bass, classic garage and funky house, and with 80s soul, disco and funk in the garden... [READ MORE]
   
BEEF OF THE WEEK: I think trademark is probably my favourite area of the law. No, seriously. Yeah, I know I have a bit of a reputation for being sarcastic, but this is definitely the most serious thing I have ever put down on virtual paper. That didn't sound very genuine, did it? Look, I'm new to this whole sincerity thing. Let's just put it like this: Trademark is the area of law most prone to hilarious disputes. No... [READ MORE]
TOP STORIES Songs industry joins record business in shouting about safe harbours
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LIVE BUSINESS Aussie dance agencies merge
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MANAGEMENT & FUNDING IMMF follows Sony/Spotify contract leak with open letter to European policy makers
Spotify partners with Arts Council's Momentum Fund
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MEDIA BBC Playlister's Andy Puleston on supporting radio by cannibalising it
Hype Machine tackling payola blog posts
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EDUCATION & EVENTS Sheffield Doc/Fest announces full music programme
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ARTIST NEWS Late Of The Pier's Ross Dawson dies
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AWARDS Ivors dished out
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ONE LINERS Hey, people have noticed that 'singles' (ie single track record releases) and 'singles' (ie unattached human beings) sound similar and so now Tinder is a promotional platform for music. And some other stuff
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AND FINALLY... CMU Beef Of The Week #255: Rihanna v The Boy Wonder
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YOUR ARMY - PROMOTIONS CO-ORDINATOR (LONDON)
Your Army is looking for a Promotions Co-ordinator to work across its Radio, Club and TV departments. The position is ideal for someone with excellent administration and time management skills.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
SUPAPASS - ARTIST/LABEL RELATIONS AND BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT EXECUTIVE (LONDON OR NORWICH)
SupaPass is an exciting new digital music platform connecting superfans with their favourite bands. We are seeking an ambitious and driven artist/label relations and business development executive with a deep understanding and strong network across music, entertainment and music-tech. If you have previously applied for this role please DO resend your application, as due to technical issues beyond the control of SupaPass, many applications went astray.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
MAMA & COMPANY - GENERAL MANAGER, LIVERPOOL ARTS CLUB (LIVERPOOL)
This is a fantastic opportunity to work and grow with an exciting company that owns some of the UK’s most established venues. To manage the venue both efficiently and effectively ensuring that the diary is commercially maximised and all statutory duties are discharged. To effectively manage the kitchen and restaurant operation, ensuring GP is maintained and customer satisfaction is the primary focus.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
[PIAS] - SOCIAL MEDIA MARKETING STRATEGIST (LONDON)
S[PIAS] is seeking an experienced Social Media Marketing Strategist to provide leadership, strategy and implementation of its in-house digital/social and online global presences. The successful candidate will interact across all [PIAS] repertoire divisions as well as working in close conjunction with the [PIAS] Brand Manager to ensure our presences reflect the values, tone and positioning of the company.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
ELITE MUSIC MANAGEMENT - BOOKING AGENT & ASSISTANT BOOKING AGENT (BRIGHTON)
Since 1999, Brighton based Elite Music Management has represented breakthrough DJs, producers and label parties. We are looking for two dynamic, talented individuals to work as part of a hard-working team. You will be required to promote a roster of acts, and manage their worldwide tour diaries. You will liaise with artists, managers and promoters on a daily basis.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
UNDER THE BRIDGE - ACTING GENERAL MANAGER (LONDON)
We require an Acting General Manager to manage and deliver the content of events at Under the Bridge including corporate events, private events, showcases, public music events and match days. To ensure the smooth operational running of Under The Bridge.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
LISTEN UP - EVENTS PRESS OFFICER (LONDON)
Listen Up provides a bespoke 360 promotional service offering radio, club, online and print campaigns in the UK and worldwide, consistently delivering results to clients in a diverse range of musical genres. We are hiring an experienced Events Press Officer to join the events team at Listen Up. The candidate will need 3-4 years' experience running print and online events campaigns and will be working across Listen Up’s extensive festival and events roster.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
MAMA & COMPANY - E-MARKETING CO-ORDINATOR (LONDON)
MAMA & Company are looking for an experienced E-marketing Co-ordinator. This is a fantastic opportunity to work and grow with an exciting company who own some of London's most established venues. You will need to have experience of managing email marketing campaigns, database management and analysis, as well as holding high levels of computer literacy. Knowledge of HTML, CSS and Java is essential.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
HOUSE OF 27 – SOCIAL MEDIA INTERNSHIP (PAID) (LONDON)
House of 27 is a UK digital PR company representing both development and established artists across unsigned, independent label and major record label setups. We require an intern to support our small, friendly team in our daily work environment. An additional interest in A&R and scouting new bands would be ideal, but passion for new music and enthusiasm for digital is a must.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
DOMINO RECORDING CO - DIGITAL OPERATIONS MANAGER (LONDON)
Domino Recording Co is seeking a high calibre individual to oversee its digital operations processes, based in the London office. This full-time position will be responsible for managing direct global operations relationships across digital music partners (eg iTunes, Spotify, Google Play, Millward Brown), and ongoing management of the digital catalogue across the label.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
 
CMU Jobs is a proven way to recruit the best music business talent for roles across the industry at all levels, from graduate to senior management. To book an ad contact Sam on 020 7099 9060 or email ads@unlimitedmedia.co.uk
 

Songs industry joins record business in shouting about safe harbours
Just in case you thought the music industry had gone a whole week without shouting about safe harbours, don't worry, we had a PRS AGM and the Ivors, both prime opportunities for music business representatives to have a grand old moan about tech giants exploiting the intricacies of copyright law to their commercial advantage.

As previously reported, the so called safe harbours of American and European copyright law have quickly risen to the top of the music industry's piracy gripe list this year, usurping Google as enemy number one, except that moaning about 'safe harbours' is really just code for moaning about Google, it being the by far the biggest beneficiary of the 'mere conduit' get outs, certainly in Europe and North America.

If you're secretly confused as to what exactly these safe harbours are that we're all meant to be getting so angry about, may I suggest you get yourself a copy of the recent CMU Trends Report that explained it all, or just come along to our upcoming CMU Insights seminar on all things music licensing, during which everything will become super clear.

But if you insist on a TL;DR, well, safe harbours allow Google to circumvent liability for copyright infringement when it hosts or links to infringing content providing [a] the hosting/linking is the result of user or automated actions and [b] it has a content/link takedown system in place. It's how Google can run YouTube as a streaming service where rights owners have to opt out rather than opt in.

And confirming that it's not just the record industry that is getting tetchy about the safe harbours in 2015, Robert Ashcroft, boss of the UK publishing sector's collecting society PRS, used a big chunk of his speech at the organisation's AGM earlier this week to hone in on the issue.

Noting the music industry's moderate successes in curtailing the growth of file-sharing, Ashcroft mused: "[But] who needs to pirate music when it can be accessed for free from sites that claim that they can operate without a licence, or others that hide behind the legislation to set their own rules as to what token payment they will, or will not, make? How can it be that user-generated content services can use safe harbour legislation to avoid the need to pay a licence and insist that they are mere conduits of content when their business models are predicated on monetising the creative works they carry?"

Telling his audience that he'd prefer it if Spotify cut back the content available on its freemium level in a bid to provide a greater incentive for consumers to sign up to premium, Ashcroft conceded that "they have to compete with user-generated content platforms, which have all the content anyway. Even when Beyonce made her new single 'Die With You' available exclusively on Tidal it was available on YouTube within minutes".

He went on: "Taylor Swift is still absent from Spotify, but available on YouTube. And for those consumers who have little awareness of copyright, YouTube will helpfully point them to apps that will enable them to download streams from the service and strip ads from them, effectively offering a music experience equivalent to Spotify Premium - for free".

"Meanwhile, Spotify can't feed its subscription layer without bringing consumers into the ad-funded layer, and they can't get them into the ad-funded layer unless they have all the content that is available on UGC platforms. If they don't carry Taylor Swift or Beyonce they're not only at a pricing disadvantage, but also at a content disadvantage. This is unfair competition".

Continuing on that theme, the chairman of songwriter group BASCA, Simon Darlow, used his speech at yesterday's Ivor festivities to likewise lay into tech firms relying on safe harbours to build content businesses.

He said: "We are all well aware that streaming is becoming the dominant means of listening to music, as ownership dwindles. But streaming has not yet proven that it can provide viable income for future generations of songwriters and composers. This is largely because some companies exploit safe harbour legislation to avoid paying a fair value for music and thereby compete unfairly with those that do".

Addressing the smattering of tech firms in the room, he continued: "For those of you here today whose search engines provide links to software that enable people to steal songs from a service that is only licensed to stream, you are undermining the value of our music".

"For any of you whose company maintains that it only has to pay if it monetises our works, you too are undermining the value of our music. For any others out there who remain unlicensed, and rely on notice and takedown, you are accessories to the theft of our music. All of you are making it virtually impossible for licensed businesses to thrive and grow. All of you are helping to kill songwriting and composition. If you value your future, please help us have a future by respecting the value of our work".

So take note "those of you". But mainly Google. And possibly SoundCloud. And Daily Motion if you're French. And expect plenty more safe harbour shouting as the European Union's review of copyright rules continues to go through the motions this summer.

Aussie dance agencies merge
Two dance music focused booking agencies in Australia have announced they are merging, creating a significant player in the market representing a large roster of DJ and producer talent. Sydney-based Soapbox Artists, which grew out of the Australian wing of Ministry Of Sound, is allying with the Melbourne-based 360 Agency.

Confirming the deal, Soapbox Artists GM Trent Grimes told reporters: "This is a big step forward for Soapbox Artists and we are so excited to be joining forces with 360 Agency. The combination of our artist rosters and team of expert agents is going to make Soapbox the go-to agency in Australia. We will now be able to deliver an even broader selection of acts to the promoters and venues we work with around Australia and internationally".

360 MD Pete Sofo added: "Over the years Ministry have proven themselves to be a creative, forward thinking company and this new alliance will open doors for our artists both locally and internationally".

IMMF follows Sony/Spotify contract leak with open letter to European policy makers
The International Music Managers Forum has used the leak earlier this week of Sony Music's 2011 Spotify contract as a springboard to discuss the European Commission's Digital Single Market plans, which, as previously reported, are currently being developed in Brussels. In an open letter, the organisation used this week's revelations to put the spotlight back on some of the issues it has been vocal about before, in particular transparency.

"Instead of mystery deals hidden from the artists whose copyrighted creations the deals exploit there should be an obligation for transparency", the IMMF wrote. "Digital promises greater transparency than the old physical markets. We don't just want artists to be paid fairly, we also want them to get the relevant usage data. It is impossible to prove fair remuneration is occurring without transparency"​.

On the always contentious issue of non-disclosure agreements, the confidentiality commitments that have kept deals like the Sony/Spotify one leaked this week so secret to date, the IMMF continues: "We are not against commercially relevant NDAs. We (artists and their representatives) just want the basic information relating to usage (of the music and the artist's name and likeness) to be shared with us by our commercial 'partners', the labels and publishers. The information relating to ad-revenue services, subscription services, equity stakes, technical payments, marketing payments etc, is as relevant to an artist and their representatives as the information artists expect to receive relating to vinyl records or CDs. Digital should bring transparency and granularity".

Of course, if every artist and manager was brought within a label's digital service NDAs, it would arguably be impossible to enforce the confidentiality clauses, because so many people would know the terms, information would surely leak and it would be impossible to know from where. Though a possible compromise is that the accountants artists hire to audit their royalties could be given access to the crucial information NDAed by labels, publishers and the DSPs.

Either way, more transparency might encourage more efficiency too. Which is another issue raised by the IMMF in its open letter. "There is a blockage", it notes. "How music is delivered to consumers has been transformed by the opportunity of digital, however creators are left with a back office infrastructure which has not yet been transformed by the power of digital innovations (and therefore ultimately consumers are also disadvantaged). A lot of the issues in the music industry arise from the failure to fully seize the digital opportunity to restructure business practices​, and deal terms to reflect the changed environment".

"The technology exists to remove the blockage", it continues. "Only two positions in the music value pipeline are essential: i) creators and ii) consumers: Fan to artist, artist to fan. The purpose of copyright is to foster creativity. The purpose of a digital market is to benefit creators and consumers".

So, lots to digest. Though perhaps the biggest message in the letter to those leading on the Digital Single Market initiative is that artists and songwriters must be part of any debates that occur this year. The management group writes: "In copyright debates it is important that creators, and their representatives, are heard from; labels and publishers are our 'partners' but we don't always have the same interests".

Read the IMMF's open letter in full here.

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Spotify partners with Arts Council's Momentum Fund
For the briefest of moments it looked like today's CMU Daily might not have a Spotify story in it. We've already covered Will Hope's excellent keynote at CMU Insights @ The Great Escape last Friday, and the not one but two big developments at Spotify this week that the streaming service really wants you to know about, and that big one they'd rather you not discuss; so what about Friday's Daily?

Well hurrah for this. The PRS For Music Foundation and Arts Council England has just announced that Spotify is now the digital partner on its Momentum Music Fund initiative, the market-leading streaming service shunting poor old Deezer out of the way when it comes to allying with ACE's artist-supporting grants programme. Perhaps Deezer can find a fund for podcasters to support. I wish there was a fund for podcasters.

Anyway, ACE, PRSF, MMF, Spotify. The tie up, we are told, "will further extend Momentum's impact, with an additional funding contribution, alongside a reward package containing exciting promotional opportunities. Momentum artists will enjoy a close relationship working with the Spotify team and will benefit from access to tools, features and best practices that will enable them to connect with Spotify's 60 million active users across 58 markets globally".

Confirming its new involvement in the Momentum scheme, Spotify's Artist Ambassador (which is definitely at thing) Bryan Johnson told reporters: "We're very pleased to be partnering with PRS For Music Foundation and Arts Council England on the Momentum Fund. This is another example of how Spotify is committed to investing in emerging artists by providing promotional value and expertise, as well as financial assistance. Artists are at the heart of what we do here at Spotify, and we hope that our contribution will allow all those involved in the Momentum Fund to take the vital next steps in their careers".

The Spotify tie up comes as ACE and the PRS For Music Foundation celebrate two years of the Momentum initiative with a session at Liverpool Sound City, which will almost certainly run through a few of the top level stats, like it supporting 68 acts, helping fund 46 albums and 50 UK tours, and investing more than £500,000 into artist development.

BBC Playlister's Andy Puleston on supporting radio by cannibalising it
Having heard how record companies are using playlists to engage listeners on the streaming platforms at last week's CMU Insights @ The Great Escape, we then turned the spotlight on how media are helping curate the streaming experience, as well as asking the crucial question, why would they even do that? Our focus was the BBC's Playlister initiative, discussed by the Corporation's Digital Editor For Music Andy Puleston.

"Projects like this are often a response to what's going on outside and what our audiences are doing", Puleston said of the origins of Playlister, which launched in 2013. "And also what we feel we can achieve technologically at the BBC. You have to remember the BBC is not a tech company, we're a broadcaster that has a tech bit, but a tech bit which is growing in sophistication and ambition all the time".

The Playlister idea grew out of an update that was made to the Radio 1 homepage in 2011, which added a 'love' button to the station's realtime 'now playing' information, and which would then recommend to the user other content on the website based on the track they had just tagged.

"We had just launched a sign in service on the BBC site", Puleston explained. "Prior to that we weren't really able to give users a logged-in state, so we weren't able to log any usage data and feed it back. But these things started to come on stream and we plugged them all together".

The Playlister service basically allows users of BBC Radio websites to add tracks they hear on the Corporation's radio stations to special playlists, which they can then export to Spotify, Deezer, iTunes and YouTube. On top of that, the BBC is now creating bespoke playlists itself based on its radio shows that people can access on their streaming platform of choice.

Given the evolving streaming platforms are arguably competition for traditional radio, the BBC engaging in this way may seem counterintuitive. "It does seem, oddly, like we're cannibalising our own model", Pulestone admitted, but he said there were a number of reasons why the BBC had created Playlister.

"One, there's a creative opportunity. Also, there are quite a lot of restrictions on us as a traditional broadcaster in how we evolve with the new digital platforms. But we need to evolve in a way, to futureproof our brands, to help keep the BBC and BBC Radio relevant as our audiences change".

And while traditional radio might ultimately compete with the new streaming services, everyone says the new platforms need better curation, and radio people are the traditional curators. "There is this tyranny of choice", Pulestone continued. "And radio has always been fantastic at filtering the best music there is and playing you only the best of it; our shows represent their take on what's coming out. And so, being able to put the BBC into these streaming services will give you a completely unbiased guide to what we think is great".

As BBC Playlister has begun to publish more of its own playlists, said Puleston, the team have seen interesting trends in how people engage differently with different kinds of lists.

"We recently started publishing the Radio 1 playlist onto Spotify and Deezer", he explained. "Which again might be a contradictory thing to do, but it was when the Official Charts Company changed how they organise the chart, and as soon as we realised that by putting the Radio 1 playlist in the streaming services we could materially affect or contribute to artists' bigger ambitions around their music, we jumped right in with that. It's there to support the artists that we feel are important on radio".

"That particular playlist gets a lot of streams for under 30 seconds", he continued. "So people go to the Radio 1 playlist, they scan through it - they snack on it - and they find the tracks they want, and then they harvest those tracks onto their own lists. So the listening minutes on the Radio 1 playlist are less that other playlists that we do. For example, we do another list called the 'Annie Mac Musical Hot Water Bottle', which came from her Sunday night show, and is kind of downtempo electronic music. The listening minutes on there are much higher, because it's built to be a listening experience".

As an example of a playlist that has come to complement a BBC radio show, and grow with it, Puleston brought up Fearne Cotton's 'Get Happy' playlist, which was one of the earliest created on the Playlister service, after Cotton asked listeners to select tracks for it on Radio 1 show.

"About six months in, the data showed this was a playlist that people kept coming back to again and again and again", he said. "So we went back to Fearne and said it's worth you topping this up two or three times a year and really building it into something".

"That Fearne Cotton example is a great way of using radio to talk to audiences about all this, to get them to build playlists with us", he continued. "And that helps our social media activity. So we have a whole user generated element around some of our playlists too".

Online playlists can also assure more longevity for radio features that quickly air and are then gone. Zane Lowe's (now Annie Mac's) 'Hottest Record In The World Right Now' being one such example.

"To be able to pull that song out and file it into a list every day is very helpful", said Puleston. "Other than the Radio 1 playlist, that 'Hottest Records' list is the biggest one that we do now. Obviously Zane really helped to power that, but Annie has taken it over now. Being able to build lists around radio features is helpful to us because radio has a fixed amount of shelf space. We've only got so many hours and so many songs we can get in a two hour show. But the playlists allow us to create much longer and many more listening experiences".

As for his ambitions for the future, Puleston said that he wants to grow Playlister's work with BBC Introducing, providing a greater platform for new artists to grow their audiences before breaking into a more mainstream fanbase.

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Hype Machine tackling payola blog posts
With the emerging business of playlist payola being discussed at CMU@TGE last Friday, earlier this week the founder of Hype Machine, Anthony Volodkin, posted about his company's efforts to stop those pesky music marketers from buying their way onto blogs, so that their artists and releases appear higher than they should in music blog aggregator's charts.

Referring to a growing trend, Volodkin wrote: "A handful of labels and PR outlets have focused their efforts on illicitly gaining coverage on Hype Machine-indexed blogs. The most common approach is to become a contributor at an established blog and post their clients (or clients their friends are promoting). For maximum impact, the same person would then get a spot at multiple blogs to create the appearance of broader support for the release".

He goes on: "In some cases, the people running these blogs were aware of this, in others these discoveries have come as a surprise. We have stopped indexing blogs that support such behaviour or do not select their writers carefully. There are a few reasons why it's important for us that this does not continue on Hype Machine".

"First, you should be able to listen to a track knowing that it was posted because the writer thinks it's good - not because they're a client. And second, by creating a false sense of popularity for their artists, marketers can manipulate you into liking the music they are paid to promote".

He concluded: "While blogs are an integral part of music marketing in 2015, we want to support bloggers, labels, and PR agencies that operate with integrity".

  Vigsy's Club Tip: Promised Land at Egg
This bank holiday weekend sees Promised Land go old skool with the 'Respect Your History' sessions, featuring Chicago's acid house originator DJ Pierre and 808 State headlining the retro main room. And with a BBQ in the afternoon, plus four other areas playing deep house, drum n bass, classic garage and funky house, and with 80s soul, disco and funk in the garden, there's something for everyone.

DJ Pierre is probably best known for his seminal 303 classic 'Acid Tracks', while his new single 'The Underground' with My Digital Enemy is also rocking dancefloors. Meanwhile electronic pioneers 808 State are always exciting to see on a bill - I think their 1989 single 'Pacific State' is one of my top 40 tunes ever, and these stalwarts of the Summer Of Love still know how to rock it.

Main room support comes from Trevor Fung, Philgood & Ram, Huck Finn and Mark Ruston. Meanwhile, the terrace sees Copyright from the mighty Defected stable spin some proper house music in the company of Arkoss, DJ Mets, Unorthodox and LED. And on top of all that, Egg's club within a club, The Apothecary, will shake to the sounds of classic drum n bass with Movement's Bryan Gee and EZM heading things up.

Sunday 24 May, Egg Club, 200 York Way, Kings Cross, London, N7 9AX, 6pm - 8am, £8-20. More info here.
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Late Of The Pier's Ross Dawson dies
Late Of The Pier drummer Ross Dawson has been killed in a "very sudden and tragic accident", his family announced yesterday.

In a statement, the musician's family said: "Our beloved Ross was involved in a very sudden and tragic accident on Friday night. Ross was the drummer in Late Of The Pier who formed in 2005. As well as writing and playing his own material Ross was a drummer with many other successful artists including Misty Miller, Kai Fish and most recently Zibra".

"Ross was a monumental force in the lives of everybody who knew him, multi-talented, modest, kind and generous", they continued. "He loved and was loved by his family. The world has become a sadder place without him. He will be eternally missed by all who knew and loved him".

Chairman of Warner Bros Records Miles Leonard, who worked with the band at Parolophone, added: "Late Of The Pier were one of the most original, innovative and exciting artists I've ever worked with. Ahead of their time but with such a youthful outlook in both music and life. Although our time working together was relatively short, I shall remember Ross with great fondness and as a bright, personable and warm character. Sadly we have all lost a talented musician but his music will be with us forever. Our sincere condolences go to his friends and family".

Sheffield Doc/Fest announces full music programme
Documentary film festival Sheffield Doc/Fest has announced its full programme of music-related screenings and events for its 2015 edition.

Among the highlights are: the opening night world premiere of 'The Greatest Shows On Earth: A Century of Funfairs, Circuses and Carnivals', which features a score by Sigur Rós' Georg Hólm and Orri Dýrasonfrom; Nina Simone documentary 'What Happened, Miss Simone?', which features previously unreleased recordings; and a masterclass with 'Cobain: Montage Of Heck' director Brett Morgen.

The previously reported 'Orion: The Man Who Would Be King' will also receive its European premiere. This is the latest effort from 'Sound It Out' and 'The Great Hip Hop Hoax' director Jeanie Finlay, about a performer who convinced (a section of) the world that he was the late Elvis wearing a mask.

There will also be the opportunity to pitch short documentary ideas for BBC Radio 1 and 1Xtra's 'Stories' series, which began as a 60 minute radio programme but has more recently branched out into video.

Sheffield Doc/Fest takes place 5-10 Jun. See the full schedule here.

Ivors dished out
So it was the songwriting community's big day out yesterday, and getting some glory from Ivor's engine of award giving goodness were all and every single one of the following...

Most Performed Work: Rather Be
Written by Jack Patterson (Clean Bandit) and James Napier
Published in the UK by Universal Music Publishing/Salli Isaak Songs and Sony/ATV Music Publishing

Album Award: So Long, See You Tomorrow
Written by Jack Steadman
Published in the UK by Imagem Music

Best Song Musically And Lyrically: Take Me To Church
Written by Andrew Hozier-Byrne
Published in the UK by Sony/ATV Music Publishing/The Evolving Music Company

Best Contemporary Song: Rather Be
Written by Jack Patterson (Clean Bandit) and James Napier
Published in the UK by Universal Music Publishing/Salli Isaak Songs and Sony/ATV Music Publishing

Best Original Film Score: '71
Composed by David Holmes
Published in the UK by Universal Music Publishing

Best Television Soundtrack: The Honourable Woman
Composed by Natalie Holt and Martin Phipps
Published in the UK by Imagem FTV and Du Vinage Publishing

Outstanding Song Collection: Albert Hammond
The Ivors Classical Music Award: Judith Weir
Outstanding Contribution to British Music: Boy George
Songwriter Of The Year: Ed Sheeran
The Ivors Inspiration Award: James Dean Bradfield, Sean Moore and Nicky Wire (aka The Manic Street Preachers)
The Ivors Special Anniversary Award: Bob Geldof and Midge Ure
Lifetime Achievement: Geezer Butler, Tony Iommi, Ozzy Osbourne and Bill Ward (aka Black Sabbath)
Special International Award: Paul Williams
BASCA Fellowship: Annie Lennox

Hey, people have noticed that 'singles' (ie single track record releases) and 'singles' (ie unattached human beings) sound similar and so now Tinder is a promotional platform for music. And some other stuff

Other notable announcements and developments today...

• Interscope-signed electro house purveyor Zedd is promoting his new album on Tinder, with those who 'swipe right' on his face being offered the chance to buy his new record at half the price it costs on iTunes. Jason Derulo promoted a new video via the dating app earlier this year, which suggests this is going to become 'a thing'. Oh joy.

• Look, here's the video for 'Hey Mama' by David Guetta, which features Nicki Minaj and Afrojack.

• Little Mix will release their new single, 'Black Magic', on 10 Jul. It's a fine piece of work, have a listen here.

• Drenge have released the video for new single, 'Running Wild'. Watch here.

• Tame Impala have released the video for new single 'Cause I'm A Man', taken from their new album 'Currently', which is released on 17 Jul. Watch here.

• I would say that listening to 'Wyoming' by Heather Wood Broderick is a good idea. Here's the video.

• Prinzhorn Dance School have announced that they will release their third album, 'Home Economics', on 8 Jun. They'll also be touring, including a show at St Pancras Old Church in London on 12 Jun.

• Asian Dub Foundation will perform a new live score to George Lucas's debut film 'THX' at the Barbican on 19 Jun. The band's new album, 'More Signal More Noise', is out on 10 Jun.

• Canadian showcase festival Indie Music Week's roving European edition will take place in Manchester 28-31 May. More info here.

CMU Beef Of The Week #255: Rihanna v The Boy Wonder
I think trademark is probably my favourite area of the law. No, seriously. Yeah, I know I have a bit of a reputation for being sarcastic, but this is definitely the most serious thing I have ever put down on virtual paper.

That didn't sound very genuine, did it? Look, I'm new to this whole sincerity thing. Let's just put it like this: Trademark is the area of law most prone to hilarious disputes. No trademark, no Disney v Deadmau5. No trademark, no Katy Perry v that Left Shark statue. No trademark, no Mutya Beuna paper plate industry.

Trademark really is one of the greatest things humanity has ever invented. It highlights our collective personality flaws like nothing else (except patents), and that is the kind of shit on which I thrive. Well done, lawyers.

This week's trademark bellendry comes in the form of DC Comics getting all shirty with Rihanna. "How could anyone possibly be angry with Rihanna?" you might ask. Especially a company that creates comic books.

Well, as you probably know, Rihanna's real name is Robyn. And she now wants to trademark that name for use in a number of areas of business. DC is opposed to this because it owns a number of trademarks in relation to its character Robin. Yes, that's right, DC is worried that people will confuse Rihanna with Batman's sidekick.

Let's be fair though. One thing Rihanna is hoping to use her all-new Robyn trademark for is "online non-downloadable general feature magazines". My favourite.

Now, DC has long owned the Robin trademark for comic books, and apparently has ideas that it might one day launch a standalone title for The Boy Wonder. And, of course, if you were to see a magazine called Robyn with Rihanna's face on it, you might not realise that it wasn't a comic book devoted to a teenage boy in a cape.

Moreover, DC reckons that Rihanna's use of Robyn as a name would piggyback on the goodwill built up by Robin since he first appeared in print back in 1940, and would dilute the character's distinctive brand.

Though DC doesn't seem to have mentioned what is surely the biggest possible confusion here: the fact that Batman's sidekick Robyn has been moonlighting as a Swedish popstar for more than two decades now.

 
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