WEDNESDAY 1 JUL 2015
TODAY'S TOP STORY: So, Apple Music launched yesterday. Did you notice? Have you been digging all the Beats1 goodness? Have you been busy reconstructing all your Spotify playlists within the Apple ecosystem? Are you fully Connected to your favourite pop stars? Have you worked out how to ensure Apple doesn't bill you $9.99 on 30 Sep? Do you know if you and all your mates can trick the system... [READ MORE]
 
TODAY'S APPROVED: Prolific Japanese pop-rap duo Suiyoubi No Campanella have just returned with a video for their song 'Shakushain', which they self-released in Japan back in April. An intricately created track, it plays off the rhythms of the percussion underneath against rapper Koumai's vocals over the top. And as it progresses, producer Kenmochi Hidefumi slowly slides more layers.... [READ MORE]
TOP STORIES Apple Music launches
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LEGAL French magazine held liable for publishing piracy guide
RIAA seeks customer information from domain firm in Grooveshark v2 chase
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LIVE BUSINESS Kilimajaro launches its own ticketing site
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DIGITAL & D2F SERVICES Pop stars share their Shazamed tracks
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MEDIA 15% of UK web users block the ads, could they be persuaded not to?
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ARTIST NEWS Guns N Roses have enough material recorded for three more albums
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ONE LINERS ASCAP and Universal promotions, Independent Label Market rarities, and some new tracks
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AND FINALLY... Katy Perry caught in Hollywood convent sale squabble
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[PIAS] COOPERATIVE - LABEL MANAGER (LONDON)
[PIAS] Cooperative, a division of [PIAS], are looking for a dynamic and knowledgeable UK label manager. Based at [PIAS] UK office, this is an ideal position for someone with a minimum of two years experience in label management, marketing, retail, and production.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
CLWB IFOR BACH - PROMOTER (CARDIFF)
Clwb Ifor Bach are looking for an enthusiastic individual to join their promotions team. Based in Cardiff, the city centre live music and club space is widely regarded as one of Wales's most iconic venues with over 30 years experience of promoting and supporting great music. This a fantastic opportunity to contribute to the future development and direction of the venue and work in one of the UK's most dynamic cities.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
NINJA TUNE - JUNIOR GRAPHIC DESIGNER (LONDON)
The role entails ad-hoc graphic design duties, the majority of which are reworking existing artwork for a variety of web and print media, including social network banners and print posters. Applicants must be deadline conscious, perform tasks fastidiously, and able to follow a brief accurately and quickly, with multiple revisions. You should have a keen eye for high visual impact, and an enthusiasm and knowledge for music-based artwork.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
DOMINO RECORDING CO - INTERNATIONAL TEAM (LONDON)
Domino Recording Co is seeking a dynamic music lover to join our International Team, based in the London office. This full-time position will be responsible for production and promotional support as well as general admin required by the International Team.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
SLAM DUNK - PROMOTER (LEEDS)
One of the UK’s biggest rock music brands, Slam Dunk Ltd are looking to recruit a new promoter. We are seeking a hardworking, organised, and very creative individual with a passion for live music and club nights. The successful candidate will be able to work well under pressure and be able to work to tight deadlines.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
FUTURESOUND EVENTS - PROMOTER (LEEDS)
Futuresound Events are seeking a hard working, organised, creative and enthusiastic individual with a passion for live music. Working alongside the head promoter you will assist in the booking, organisation and execution of the companies shows, festivals and other events. The successful candidate will play a fundamental role in booking new and up-and-coming bands.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
 
CMU Jobs is a proven way to recruit the best music business talent for roles across the industry at all levels, from graduate to senior management. To book an ad contact Sam on 020 7099 9060 or email ads@unlimitedmedia.co.uk
 

Apple Music launches
So, Apple Music launched yesterday. Did you notice? Have you been digging all the Beats1 goodness? Have you been busy reconstructing all your Spotify playlists within the Apple ecosystem? Are you fully Connected to your favourite pop stars? Have you worked out how to ensure Apple doesn't bill you $9.99 on 30 Sep? Do you know if you and all your mates can trick the system and buy a family package together? Has anyone worked out how the artists are getting equitable remuneration from the radio channels yet?

Actually, it's interesting, is it not, that so much of the online chatter since Apple's big new play in streaming music went live yesterday has focused on Beats1, which is, after all, just a radio station. Like every other radio station. Even if some in the tech press seem to struggle with the concept of a DJ playing and occasionally talking over records.

OK, Beats1 is 'global'. But since simulcasting online became the norm, most radio stations have been global. The difference, I guess, is that Beats1 is being marketed globally. But with such an Anglo-American bias to its output, you sense at least half the world's population won't be tuning in. Perhaps that's what Beats2 will be for.

And even in the part of the world where Anglo-American music dominates, Beats1 is unlikely to win over a mainstream audience. Kicking things off with newcomers Spring King was typical of Zane Lowe, an undeniable consistent champion of great new music (hey, he once wrote a column for CMU, he must be good). And the fact 17 of the 41 tracks played in the first few hours of Beats1 being on air came from indie labels (according to some quick counting by Music Business Worldwide), will be welcomed by the grass roots music community.

It's a good new music service. But there's a reason Capital and Heart play what they play; in the main it's what the masses want. And for Apple Music to deliver for the music industry it needs to do more than appeal to core music fans, who are likely amongst the 40 million people already paying to stream somewhere on the net. The real test for Apple's new music play is whether it can turn 40 million more mainstream consumers onto subscription-based streams come October.

Whatever you think about the product - and the many reviews in music and tech circles seem to conclude it's pretty decent, with a few bugs here and there, and still plenty of room for improvement - the potential of Apple Music is the 800 million people already connected to iTunes worldwide, who only need to press one button to become subscribers to the new service. But will they pay once the three month free trial is up?

True, Apple has made it tricky to stop auto-payments beginning once the three months are over, but both the tech giant and the music industry need millions to properly embrace the concept of paid-for streams for this project to be a success. And $120 a year remains a big ask for more casual music consumers. And if said punters ultimately just opt to access Beats1 and any follow up radio channels, well, that won't help the music industry in terms of decent income.

But still, hey, Apple Music! It's here! Finally! Boom, let's get some Beats! Good times. Etc.

French magazine held liable for publishing piracy guide
A court in France has ruled that a magazine publisher violated French copyright law by running an article offering some top tips on how to access illegal sources of music and movie content online, including the low down on the best torrent clients, and guidance that Google is the pirate's friends because "with some clever keywords and in a handful of clicks you will fill your hard drives with joy and laughter".

French record industry group SCPP reckoned that the article, in computing mag Téléchargement last summer, violated a French law that forbids people from "knowingly encouraging" others to use software to infringe copyright.

The magazine argued that its article stressed several times that piracy was illegal. But, according to Torrentfreak, a court in Nanterre decided that wasn't sufficient to avoid liability, and fined the publisher 10,000 euros, roughly the monies generated by sale of the magazine.

Fans of copyright case law will surely contrast this ruling with the 1981 case of RCA v Fairfax, am I right? Yeah. Ha. Who'd of thought it. Well, in that Australian case a magazine article bigging up the then growing world of home taping was accused of so called 'authorising infringement'.

But that magazine publisher won in court, limiting, to an extent, the reach of the concept of authorising infringement in Australia, and arguably under English law too. Though the French case involves a different article, a different body of copyright law and whole different moment in history.

Still, it's an interesting case all the same, with the ruling obviously welcomed by SCPP, which told Next INpact: "A line had been crossed. This is a magazine which clearly and shamelessly incited piracy. That's what prompted us to act".

Hmm, you know how we just told you that it's well easy to find free movies and music via a Google search. Well we can't stress enough that piracy is illegal. In fact you're probably best off just not using Google at all. And I'd stop reading magazines if I was you.

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RIAA seeks customer information from domain firm in Grooveshark v2 chase
LA-based domain registrar Namecheap has been ordered to hand over the personal details of one of its customers, a person suspected of being involved in the ongoing attempts to keep Grooveshark - or at least a music service using that name - online.

As previously reported, soon after the controversial streaming music site Grooveshark was finally forced offline at the end of April, as part of a settlement between the major labels and the site's founders, who had lost a legal battle with the record industry, a clone of the service soon popped up at another domain.

The new site was run by a third party, though someone who claimed to have once worked for the now defunct streaming company. Said person claimed to have grabbed most of Grooveshark's content before it was shutdown, though some reckon the new service was actually built on the back of other different piracy set-ups.

But either way, the record industry didn't especially want another unlicensed music service online using the now infamous Grooveshark name. And the labels have been busy domain grabbing ever since, trying to force domain registrars to cancel any URLs being used by the new piracy platform. As much previously reported, some domain registrars and registries will cancel domains based on a complaint from a copyright owner, others demand a court order before taking any action.

But as soon as one domain is blocked, the service re-emerges elsewhere on the net, and the record industry still doesn't know who is behind Grooveshark v2. To that end, according to BHN, the Recording Industry Association Of America went to court in New York last week asking for an injunction forcing web firms providing services to the new Grooveshark to reveal the name, contact and payment information of their customer or customers. And the judge granted that order.

Namecheap, one of the companies targeted in the legal action, has since suspended the domain in question, though we hear that Grooveshark v2 already has an alternative web address to use. Whether the information that the domain registrar is now obliged to provide the RIAA helps the trade group directly target the individual behind the new version of the copyright infringing streaming service, well that remains to be seen.

Kilimajaro launches its own ticketing site
Live firm Kilimanjaro has launched its own ticketing site called MyTicket.co.uk. The new site will sell tickets for all of the shows and festivals promoted by the company, as well as concerts presented by classical music promoter Raymond Gubbay, which is now a sister company to Kilimanjaro, and there are plans to open up the platform to third parties down the line too.

The site is a UK version of existing ticketing website MyTicket.de, launched six months ago by Deutsche Entertainment AG, the German company which took a controlling stake in Kilimanjaro last year. DEAG says that its own ticketing service was responsible for 5% of all online ticket sales for its shows during the first full quarter that the site was operating.

Confirming the launch of the UK service, Kilimanjaro boss Stuart Galbraith told reporters: "This is an exciting development for Kilimanjaro. We have always operated as an independent promoter and myticket.co.uk allows us to continue to do so and provide fans with tickets directly. We have many exciting projects in place for 2015. It's a time for growth and investment in our core regular projects whilst looking for interesting opportunities wherever they arise".

Meanwhile Anthony Findlay, CEO of Raymond Gubbay, added: "We are delighted to be working with our partners DEAG and our UK sister company Kilimanjaro Live on this exciting new ticketing platform, providing a tailored service both for our existing customers and giving a greater reach in to the market place".

Pop stars share their Shazamed tracks
"The biggest stars in the world are also the biggest fans" says Shazam. Yeah. Of themselves. The egotistical self-important self-centred self-obsessed self-serving twats. Yeah Robin Thicke, I'm looking at you. Not you Alicia Keys, we all know you're too busy reading the works of Friedrich Nietzsche to be thinking about yourself.

Anyway, Shazam yesterday launched a new feature whereby you can see what tracks various pop stars are tagging via the song-recognition app, and thereby navigate the world of new music based on what established artists are listening too. Right now. Well, right last week

So Calvin Harris, who seemed to be doing a lot of tagging five days ago, would direct you to 'Shots Fired (Original Mix)' by Mightyfools & Mike Hawkins. Shazam would then direct you to listen to the track on Apple Music, which is what Tidal backer Harris would definitely want you to do. Definitely.

Says Fall Out Boy's Pete Wentz (what? yeah, him, what of it?): "As an artist, I'm a big fan of discovering new music and Shazam helps me keep a pulse on that. I'm stoked to be able to share what I'm into with millions of fellow music fans".

Shazam are also making public for the first time tag counts, that is to say how often any one track has been tagged - or 'Shazamed', did that ever become a verb, I can't remember - by users of the app. So 5887 other people have tagged 'Shots Fired (Original Mix)' for example. Which is good to know.

15% of UK web users block the ads, could they be persuaded not to?
Less than half of UK adults realise that most free content online - whether newspaper and magazine sites, or social networks, or freemium streaming platforms - is paid for by advertising.

I don't know who these people are to be honest with you, and how they thought said content was being generated for free, though the point is probably that most people just don't think about these things. And before you blame it all on 'the kids', older people surveyed were less likely to make the connection than younger people.

The stat comes from a YouGov survey commissioned by the Internet Advertising Bureau, which was mainly looking at how widely ad-blocking software is used by people who want free content but don't want the ads, and what motivates people to block adverts from appearing.

A fifth of those surveyed had downloaded ad-blocking tools, and about 15% were using them. But would the ad-blockers do less blocking if they were aware that the adverts were paying for the content? Not really. Only 10% of those blocking ads and unaware of the ad/content connection said they'd be less likely to block now that they have been enlightened.

But the survey did find that many people blocked ads because they "interrupted their experience", suggesting that there is still the potential for brands to reach these people via online advertising if only they do so more subtly. Though more subtle advertising probably means 'branded content', which increasingly blurs the line between advertising and editorial.

Commenting on the survey, IAB CEO Guy Phillipson said: "When it comes to a free and an ad-free internet, a lot of consumers want to have their cake and eat it. However, those unaware that most online services are free - or cost very little - because sites make money from showing visitors ads, could be in for a shock if websites start charging for access because ad blocking reduces their revenue from advertising. The bottom line is that if the web didn't have ads, most sites could only exist by charging subscriptions".

  Approved: Suiyoubi No Campanella
Prolific Japanese pop-rap duo Suiyoubi No Campanella have just returned with a video for their song 'Shakushain', which they self-released in Japan back in April.

An intricately created track, it plays off the rhythms of the percussion underneath against rapper Koumai's vocals over the top. And as it progresses, producer Kenmochi Hidefumi slowly slides more layers between the two.

'Shakushain' is definitely one of these guys' better tracks, but there's plenty more on their well-stocked YouTube channel. If that's a bit daunting, I'd head for 'Jeanne d'Arc' or 'Diablo' next.

But first, watch the video for 'Shakushain'.
CLICK HERE to read and share online
 

Guns N Roses have enough material recorded for three more albums
Guns N Roses have enough material to record "two or three" more albums, or so says guitarist Richard Fortus. Which, by the band's past release frequency, would keep them going to 2053. So that's good.

Asked about how things were going on the follow-up to 2008's 'Chinese Democracy', Fortus told VerdamMnis Magazine, according to Classic Rock: "So much has been recorded, we could get two or three albums, seriously. We can't wait to put it out as soon as possible".

But hey Rich, when will you be putting that record out? Bandmate Dizzy Reed adds: "When will it come out? We still don't know. Only Axl knows, but it is very secret. Be patient".

Ah, patience. Well, if you're still a Guns N Roses fan in 2015, you've presumably got plenty of that. Though Fortus does reckon the new album could be with us as soon as next year.

ASCAP and Universal promotions, Independent Label Market rarities, and some new tracks

Other notable announcements and developments today...

• US collecting society ASCAP has promoted Lauren Iossa to the job of Exec VP Chief Marketing & Communications Office. She will oversee all of the society's global PR, brand and corporate marketing, as well as commas and special events. Which sounds like a busy schedule. "Capitalise" said Iossa.

• Universal Music Publishing in the US has promoted Jessica Rivera to the role of EVP/Head Of East Coast Operations. I know what you're thinking, "I never heard of that job title before!" Well, aren't you the observant dude. It's a brand new position. See, simples. "Boundaries" says Rivera.

• The next Independent Label Market takes place in London at Old Spitalfields Market on 11 Jul with participating labels promising rarity releases from Bjork, Sun Ra, Django Django, James Vincent McMorrow, Courtney Barnett and many more. Go see.

• Ever wondered what a Father John Misty cover of Arcade Fire's 'The Suburbs' might sound like? Look like? Feel like? Taste like? Well, wonder no more. Though we don't recommending licking your screen. Just guess what it tastes like.

• One of Four Tet's collaborations with the late great Steve Reid - a take on Derrick May's 'Strings Of Life' recorded at the Green Man Festival in 2006 - is getting a proper release in aid of the Steve Reid Foundation. Check it out here.

• That Santigold who you might all remember has shared a new track called 'Radio' which appears on the soundtrack to the upcoming movie 'Paper Towns'. Don't know whether it will also appear on her next album, which is apparently set for release later this year. But in case it isn't, you better listen to it now.

Katy Perry caught in Hollywood convent sale squabble
While Justin Bieber has been busy praising the Lord this week, Katy Perry has been busy angering the Almighty. Or possibly not. It all depends on whether God prefers some random nuns or the Catholic church establishment. Perry is in with the latter. So I'm not sure it's looking good for her.

This all comes down to that common theological issue: real estate. The Sisters Of The Immaculate Heart Of Mary are currently in dispute with the Los Angeles Archdiocese of the Roman Catholic Church over who owns an old hilltop convent that overlooks Hollywood. The property is up for sale, but both the sisters and the archdiocese reckon that they have the rights to sell it.

And in case you were wondering, this is pop news because of reports the archdiocese has agreed to sell the convent to Perry, while the sisters have already sold it to a local restaurateur called Dana Hollister. And this has all come to light because the archdiocese is now taking legal action to stop Hollister from moving into the property on the basis the sisters who sold it to her were not authorised to do so.

I know what you're thinking, what would Jesus do, right? And I think we all know. He'd sell it to the pop star. Just ask Bieber, Jesus loves pop stars.

 
ANDY MALT | Editor
Andy heads up the team, overseeing the CMU bulletin and website, coordinating features and interviews, reporting on artist and business stories, and contributing to the CMU Approved column.
Email andy@unlimitedmedia.co.uk (except press releases, see below)
   
CHRIS COOKE | MD & Business Editor
Chris provides music business coverage and analysis. Chris also leads the CMU Insights training and consultancy business and education programme CMU:DIY, and heads up CMU publisher 3CM UnLimited.
Email chris@unlimitedmedia.co.uk (except press releases, see below)
   
SAM TAYLOR | Commercial Manager & Insights Associate
Sam oversees the commercial side of the CMU media, leading on sales and sponsorship, plus helps manage and deliver the CMU Insights training courses and consultancy services.
Email sam@unlimitedmedia.co.uk or call 020 7099 9060
   
CARO MOSES | Co-Publisher
Caro helps oversee the CMU media, while as a Director of 3CM UnLimited she heads up the company's other two titles ThisWeek London and ThreeWeeks Edinburgh, and supports other parts of the business.
Email caro@unlimitedmedia.co.uk
Send ALL press releases to musicnews@unlimitedmedia.co.uk - this is checked daily by the whole editorial team meaning your release will definitely get to the right person.

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