TUESDAY 7 JUL 2015
TODAY'S TOP STORY: The US music publishing sector is set to get a combined rights collective licensing organisation for the first time with the news that SESAC is to acquire the Harry Fox Agency, creating an agency that works in both mechanical and public performance licensing. The music publishing sector routinely splits the different elements of the song copyright, treating the right to make... [READ MORE]
 
TODAY'S APPROVED: First appearing in 2007 via Blaqstarr collaboration 'Shake It To The Ground' - the '212' of its day - Baltimore-based rapper Rye Rye has since mainly made her name name as a fire-provider-for-hire on tracks by pals like MIA, Robyn and Bassnectar. She now, today, features beside approved UK producer/Nautic man Bullion on a new version of an old track of his originally titled... [READ MORE]
TOP STORIES SESAC buys Harry Fox Agency
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LEGAL Court excuses some Cox customers from ongoing BMG/Round Hill legal battle
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LIVE BUSINESS Council to meet with Live Nation over Wireless Festival gatecrashing
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BRANDS & MERCH Live Nation confirms official "fuel and lubricant sponsors" for US venues
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DIGITAL & D2F SERVICES Xbox Music rebrands as Groove
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MEDIA Band Of The Day app calls it a day
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ARTIST NEWS Neon Jungle split
You're still allowed to like Frank Ocean, even if Miguel doesn't
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ONE LINERS Stylo G, Syron, Kyary Pamyu Pamyu, and more
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AND FINALLY... Disappointing gig? Now you can get your money back (in Finland)
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EMOTICAST - SOCIAL WIZARD WANTED FOR MUSIC + MESSENGING + COOL SHIT
Why do job ads try so hard to be boring? If you also genuinely wonder too, we might be on the same page and you might want to work with us. We’re looking for a multidisciplinary Marketer/Social Media manager to lead our efforts. Messenging apps are incredibly popular right now. We want to add music to the mix and we’re uniquely positioned to do so.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
INFLUENCE DIGITAL - SOCIAL MEDIA ACCOUNT MANAGER
Influence Digital, the award winning social and digital marketing agency, is searching for a new account manager to join our team in London W1. The company creates and manages digital and social media strategies for some of the biggest names in music, film, TV and travel. This is a once in a lifetime opportunity to work with some of the hottest and most respected names in the world of entertainment.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
[PIAS] COOPERATIVE - LABEL MANAGER (LONDON)
[PIAS] Cooperative, a division of [PIAS], are looking for a dynamic and knowledgeable UK label manager. Based at [PIAS] UK office, this is an ideal position for someone with a minimum of two years experience in label management, marketing, retail, and production.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
CLWB IFOR BACH - PROMOTER (CARDIFF)
Clwb Ifor Bach are looking for an enthusiastic individual to join their promotions team. Based in Cardiff, the city centre live music and club space is widely regarded as one of Wales's most iconic venues with over 30 years experience of promoting and supporting great music. This a fantastic opportunity to contribute to the future development and direction of the venue and work in one of the UK's most dynamic cities.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
NINJA TUNE - JUNIOR GRAPHIC DESIGNER (LONDON)
The role entails ad-hoc graphic design duties, the majority of which are reworking existing artwork for a variety of web and print media, including social network banners and print posters. Applicants must be deadline conscious, perform tasks fastidiously, and able to follow a brief accurately and quickly, with multiple revisions. You should have a keen eye for high visual impact, and an enthusiasm and knowledge for music-based artwork.

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DOMINO RECORDING CO - INTERNATIONAL TEAM (LONDON)
Domino Recording Co is seeking a dynamic music lover to join our International Team, based in the London office. This full-time position will be responsible for production and promotional support as well as general admin required by the International Team.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
SLAM DUNK - PROMOTER (LEEDS)
One of the UK’s biggest rock music brands, Slam Dunk Ltd are looking to recruit a new promoter. We are seeking a hardworking, organised, and very creative individual with a passion for live music and club nights. The successful candidate will be able to work well under pressure and be able to work to tight deadlines.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
FUTURESOUND EVENTS - PROMOTER (LEEDS)
Futuresound Events are seeking a hard working, organised, creative and enthusiastic individual with a passion for live music. Working alongside the head promoter you will assist in the booking, organisation and execution of the companies shows, festivals and other events. The successful candidate will play a fundamental role in booking new and up-and-coming bands.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
 
CMU Jobs is a proven way to recruit the best music business talent for roles across the industry at all levels, from graduate to senior management. To book an ad contact Sam on 020 7099 9060 or email ads@unlimitedmedia.co.uk
 

SESAC buys Harry Fox Agency
The US music publishing sector is set to get a combined rights collective licensing organisation for the first time with the news that SESAC is to acquire the Harry Fox Agency, creating an agency that works in both mechanical and public performance licensing.

The music publishing sector routinely splits the different elements of the song copyright, treating the right to make mechanical copies of songs separately and differently to the right to perform and communicate songs to the public. The so called mechanical and performing rights are routinely controlled by different entities and licensed in different ways, which has proven challenging in the digital domain because digital services are usually exploiting both the mechanical and performing rights at the same time.

In Europe, there have been various efforts to provide combined mechanical/performing right licences to customers who need them. This is done in the UK via the alliance between the publishing sector's mechanical and performing rights societies, MCPS and PRS respectively (which today means MCPS appointing PRS For Music to handle its licensing). But in the US, the main performing rights organisations, BMI and ASCAP, are barred from getting involved in mechanical licensing by the consent decrees that govern their operations.

SESAC, however, as a smaller performing rights agency, is not governed by a consent decree. Which is why it was interesting when, just over a year ago, rumours began to spread that the private equity group that controls SESAC was in talks to buy HFA, the mechanical rights agency currently owned by the National Music Publishers Association.

And now, according to the New York Times, that deal has been done and will be confirmed later today. Terms of the deal are not known, and will have to be approved by NMPA members, though it is thought there were other bidders for Harry Fox, including other performing rights organisations.

Joining up SESAC and HFA will, in theory at least, allow the combined agency to provide joint performing/mechanical licences for any of the songs that both sides of the organisation represent, and to offer songwriters and publishers a more efficient licensing and royalty processing service. It will also give SESAC access to a world of valuable data held by HFA regarding the use of songs on a number of key digital platforms.

Explaining the rationale for the deal form his side of the table, SESAC CEO John Josephson told reporters: "Licensing is fragmented across both multiple types of rights, as well as multiple territories, for the streaming services that represent the future growth opportunity of the music industry. The result is a complex, opaque and currently inefficient licensing regime that fails to deliver the best outcomes for creators and publishers, as well as end users. What excites us about this transaction is the ability it provides to make the licensing process both simpler and more efficient, and in so doing create additional value for music creators and publishers, as well as the digital music platforms".

The coming together of SESAC and HFA will be another shake up to the collective licensing domain, where Irving Azoff's Global Music Rights and Kobalt's acquisition of AMRA are already changing the landscape, and where both ASCAP and BMI are busy trying to get their consent decrees rewritten, partly to allow them to start working with mechanical rights.

Court excuses some Cox customers from ongoing BMG/Round Hill legal battle
Some of the Cox Communications customers pulled into the US internet service provider's legal dispute with BMG and Round Hill Music have been removed from the proceedings on account of them having a very good excuse indeed.

As previously reported, BMG and Round Hill have sued Cox claiming that the ISP should lose safe harbour protection under US law because it has failed to forward letters to suspected file-sharers amongst its customer base.

Most of the big net firms in America are part of the Copyright Alert System, whereby they send on warning letters to suspected pirates. But Cox does not participate in this scheme. The music rights firms argue that its alternative approach is not good enough, so much so the ISP should be held liable for the copyright infringement of its customers (something the aforementioned safe harbours would usually prevent).

As the case rumbles on, the music firms sought to access the contact information for some of the suspected file-sharers on Cox's networks (because monitoring by the music industry can only identify IP addresses where piracy occurs, not the name of the person using that internet connection). As previously reported, while the plaintiffs had 150,000 suspected file-sharers on their list, the court said Cox must reveal the identities of just 250.

The ISP then wrote to those 250 customers, with 32 objecting to having their information handed over to BMG and Round Hill. Some objected on the grounds that they deny the file-sharing allegations, but others said that they weren't even Cox customers at the time of the alleged infringement, and that a previous customer must have been using the offending IP address at that time.

Cox had to take the objections to court and the judge, rather reasonably, has now accepted the latter group's argument as to why they should be excused from the whole dispute. But, according to Torrentfreak, those simply denying they file-shared weren't so lucky, and Cox will now provide their personal info to the music companies.

Said the judge: "Several of the persons submitting objections have provided information to the court that is sufficient to establish that they were not assigned the IP addresses that are the subject of the court's ruling at the time of the alleged infringing activity. The court sustains the objections raised by those individuals".

But, he went on: "The mere denial of any infringing activity is an insufficient reason to justify quashing the subpoena to Cox. In addition, any concerns these individuals may have relating to privacy are addressed adequately by the provisions of the protective order entered in this action".

The latter bit of that statement throws some light on BMG and Round Hill's intentions here. The "protective order" means that the two firms can only use the information they get from Cox to aid them with their specific case against the ISP, they can't launch separate proceedings against the actual suspected file-sharers. And, it now seems, the music rights firms had no intention of doing that anyway.

Quite how the two companies hope the suspected file-sharers now identified can help them with their case against Cox remains to be seen.

Council to meet with Live Nation over Wireless Festival gatecrashing
Haringey Council in North London has called in Wireless promoter Live Nation for a meeting about security measures at the festival, after gatecrashers broke through the fence around the event.

As previously reported, there were a number of instances of groups trying to break through the event's fencing, and on at least one occasion on Friday dozens did so, albeit with the help of a festival-goer on the inside. Much viewed video footage of that incident on YouTube possibly resulted in an increase in the number of people trying to gain illicit entry on subsequent days, which police and security staff endeavoured to prevent.

Confirming that it would be meeting with organisers to discuss safety at Finsbury Park-based music events, Haringey Council nonetheless told BBC Newsbeat that the scenes of gatecrashing shown in the YouTube videos were "not representative of the whole festival" and that the event as a whole saw "tens of thousands of people enjoy themselves safely".

Live Nation confirms official "fuel and lubricant sponsors" for US venues
Now, you're probably sitting there with a big smug grin on your face thinking, "Well, I'm having quite a productive week, aren't I?" But have you sorted out an official oil brand for your company yet? No, you haven't. So wipe that smug grin off your face, because we all know deep down that really you're achieving nothing.

Unless you work for Live Nation. If you work for Live Nation you can keep that smug grin on your face if you want. Let's face it, if you work for Live Nation that smug grin ain't going nowhere. Until the day of judgement. Because God hates Live Nation.

But the point is that Live Nation yesterday confirmed a marketing alliance with Shell Oil Products which, from this point onwards, will be the "official fuel sponsor" for Live Nation's amphitheatre venues across North America. And if you thought that was exciting, wait till you hear that Shell company Pennzoil is also the "official lubricant" of the same said venues.

Actually, Live Nation already has a brand alliance with Pennzoil. Who could forget Pennzoil Backseat Pass? You remember, Pennzoil Backseat Pass. You know, that series of videos in which "musical artists perform a song in the backseat of a moving vehicle, bringing to life the natural connection between music and cars in a compelling way". How did you forget Pennzoil Backseat Pass? It was so compelling.

But that's not to say people can't be ever more compelled, hence the new expanded tie up. "Along with the continued excitement of the web series", says the press release, "the Shell and Pennzoil brands are aligning with the power of live music to create unique experiences for consumers and fans at select Live Nation venues".

Or, in the words of Pennzoil Global Brand Director Doug Kooyman: "Over the past few years, Pennzoil has created an expanding footprint in the music category, enhancing fan passion for cars and music along the way. In 2015, together with Live Nation, Pennzoil will continue on their journey to take musical performances to the next level".

These are exciting times in which to live, that's for certain. Though Live Nation is missing a trick here. Bring "official lubricant" Pennzoil to the UK, smother the Wireless fence in the stuff, then let's watch those gatecrashers try to climb over the barricades. That, I admit, would be compelling viewing.

Xbox Music rebrands as Groove
Hey Granddad, stop all your musings about Apple Music, what's going on over at Microsoft Music, that's what the cool kids want to know, I'm sure. Well, a new name, that's what's going on.

And those twonks at Apple are going to be kicking themselves when they hear what the wunderkinds at Microsoft have come up with. The word 'music' is so last Tuesday. Get with the moment I say. Apple Music? How embarrassing. The word of the moment, people, is 'groove'. I mean it's obvious now I say it, I know, but it took the marvels at Microsoft to make you aware of that fact.

So, yes, what was Xbox Music (or, more recently, just Music) will, from this very point onwards, become known - by you, by me, and by all other human beings of this dimension - as Groove. Why? Well, because "Groove describes what people feel and do with music". It's true you know. I'm grooving with music right now. And there's nothing you can do to stop that.

In terms of functionality, Groove (not Groove Music please, whatever Microsoft's initial announcement may have said) will be pretty much what went before, ie a combination of digital locker and paid-for subscription streaming (Xbox Music phased out freebie streams last year). But regular updates are being promised. And now the service is called Groove, not even the sky is the limit for what those updates might be.

Xbox Video, by the way, has also been rebranded. 'Video'! How old school. Movies & TV. That's what you want to call your video service. Groovy.

Band Of The Day app calls it a day
The people behind the popular Band Of The Day app have announced that they are winding down the new talent tipping service to fully concentrate on their ticketing and direct-to-fan platform Applauze.

In a blog post, the service's Amanda Van West explains: "As much as we all love Band Of The Day, and have been able to keep it running for nearly four years, we've decided that now is the time to fully concentrate on Applauze by putting all of our company's focus on it. This decision does not come lightly, especially given the community we've built around Band Of The Day, but we're 100% confident that it is the right one".

Band Of The Day will reach its finale on 31 Jul, and between now and then the team behind it will be recommending other places online where people can discover new music (hey, CMU Approved does it for me!). The app's website will also relaunch at the end of the month with an archive of every tipped artist from the last four years.

Concludes Van West: "Our love for discovering new music and sharing those discoveries is something that will never go away, and we hope to continue those conversations with you all even when the app isn't around anymore".

  Approved: Rye Rye feat Bullion - Keep Up
First appearing in 2007 via Blaqstarr collaboration 'Shake It To The Ground' - the '212' of its day - Baltimore-based rapper Rye Rye has since mainly made her name name as a fire-provider-for-hire on tracks by pals like MIA, Robyn and Bassnectar.

She now, today, features beside approved UK producer/Nautic man Bullion on a new version of an old track of his originally titled 'Bum Spider' - wait, don't leave! - and now appealingly renamed 'Keep Up'. It's one wildly at-random pairing that really, really works, with Bullion's gloopy global rhythms leaking neatly into Rye Rye's more... invigorating top line flow.

Django Django's Dave Maclean, who's relevant in all this because he's releasing the track via his label Kick + Clap on 31 Jul, shares the riveting story of the song discovery: "I found an old MP3 player when I was back at my folks' house, in with a load of my old stuff, and it had this weird track on it... a dancehall rhythm made with a didgeridoo sample. It was labelled 'Bum Spider' and I tried for ages to Google it and couldn't find anything (Googling 'bum spider' brought some strange results) so I put a tweet out describing it but... nothing".

He goes on: "Then my manager, who knows the producer Bullion, told me it was by him and that he must have sent it to me ages ago! Anyway, I called Bullion up and said I had to release this track because I'd become obsessed with it. Rye Rye came to mind immediately so I got in touch and she loved the track so got on it".

Listen to Rye Rye and Bullion getting on it, together, now.
CLICK HERE to read and share online
 

Neon Jungle split
Girl group Neon Jungle have announced that they have split, with the four members instead pursuing solo careers.

In a Facebook post yesterday, they said: "We started our journey in an unknown, unnamed 'girl band' just two years ago. Within that time, we went (rather quickly) from four strangers, to four complete best friends. From being unknown, to being recognised all over the world. From being unnamed to 'Neon Jungle'".

"After many honest and heartfelt discussions, we have all agreed with a tremendously heavy heart, that it is time for us to continue our journeys individually", they continued. "This does not mean for a second we have separated! We will always and forever be in each other's lives, and ALWAYS be supportive of one another. Although this is a heart breaking reality for the four of us, it is also extremely exciting, and we would love for all of you guys to also continue our new journeys with us. Four for the price of one, aye?!"

The group released their debut album, 'Welcome To The Jungle', last July. Two of its singles, including the title track, went top ten - their best seller, 'Braveheart', reaching number four and going silver.

--------------------------------------------------

You're still allowed to like Frank Ocean, even if Miguel doesn't
Miguel has published a statement telling everyone to calm down, after it was perceived that he had some sort of beef with Frank Ocean. He doesn't, he just thinks he's better. And that's fine.

Speaking to The Sunday Times, Miguel said that he and Frank Ocean aren't friends and that he thinks his own music is best out of the two of them. Specifically: "I wouldn't say we were friends. To be completely honest - and no disrespect to anyone - I genuinely believe that I make better music, all the way around".

Now, that doesn't seem particularly controversial. But everything's controversial these days, isn't it? Saying that's probably controversial. And that. And that.

Clearing matters up, Miguel tweeted a statement last night, saying: "I want to clear the air. Yes, I am competitive, we ALL have to have a level of confident and competitiveness to put ourselves on the line day in and day out. But I also believe there's room for all artists. That's what [Miguel's new album] 'Wildheart' is all about: celebrating individuality".

He went on: "I guess what I'm saying is, there's no need to compare apples to oranges, there's something out there for everyone. That's why I'm here and I'm able to do what I do. So, thank you to everyone who enjoys my music and all love to anyone who doesn't, we're all here to find our own wave and that's OK! Stay passionate, stay free, and of course stay wild!"

I hope that you all now finally realise that you can all like different artists to different degrees to each other and that's fine. It's about time someone said it.

Stylo G, Syron, Kyary Pamyu Pamyu, and more

Other notable announcements and developments today...

• Stylo G has a new single coming out featuring guest vocals from Gyptian. It's called 'My Number One' and will be out on 28 Aug. Here's the video.

• Syron is releasing a new single called 'Talking Crazy' on 18 Sep. Yes, that does seem like a long way away, but you can listen to it right now on SoundCloud.

• Public Image Ltd have put a new track called 'Double Trouble' up on SoundCloud. It's taken from the band's new album, 'What The World Needs Now', out on 4 Sep.

• J-pop star Kyary Pamyu Pamyu will play the Roundhouse in London on 11 Oct. Tickets go on sale on Friday.

Disappointing gig? Now you can get your money back (in Finland)
Have you ever been so disappointed by a live music performance that you wanted to ask for a refund? Well now you can. Under certain circumstances. In Finland.

A ruling by Finland's Consumer Disputes Board on a 2013 Chuck Berry show in Helsinki sets a new precedent for consumers in the country. One ticketholder took a claim for a refund relating to that show to the CDB, arguing that Berry was clearly not well enough to properly perform and had even apologised to the audience for this during the show.

Following a review by the Board, it was deemed that the claimant should receive half of their money back, on the grounds that it was generally accepted that Berry's concert had been a sub-par show. This is apparently the first time such a ruling has been made in Finland.

Pauli Ståhlberg of the Consumer Disputes Board told Yle that similar future rulings could now be made for shows that do not meet consumer expectations. In addition to illness, he said, a legitimate claim might also be that the performer had been drunk or on drugs. Though that doesn't mean all musicians should be going on stage stone cold sober in Finland, don't worry.

"It's not at all unusual at rock festivals that some artists are high", noted Ståhlberg. "And that doesn't even necessarily affect the quality of their performances".

He added that this wouldn't be an easy way to get your money back on any old show, before unscrupulous Fins start rubbing their hands together: "Anyone seeking a ruling like this is always spurred by a subjective opinion, but that's not enough to get a refund. What is significant is a generally agreed view that the concert was a failure, as it was in the Chuck Berry case".

Also, in this case it took two years for one person to get half their money back, so I'm going to assume it's still probably safe (and financially viable) for artists feeling a little under the weather to risk getting on stage.

 
ANDY MALT | Editor
Andy heads up the team, overseeing the CMU bulletin and website, coordinating features and interviews, reporting on artist and business stories, and contributing to the CMU Approved column.
Email andy@unlimitedmedia.co.uk (except press releases, see below)
   
CHRIS COOKE | MD & Business Editor
Chris provides music business coverage and analysis. Chris also leads the CMU Insights training and consultancy business and education programme CMU:DIY, and heads up CMU publisher 3CM UnLimited.
Email chris@unlimitedmedia.co.uk (except press releases, see below)
   
SAM TAYLOR | Commercial Manager & Insights Associate
Sam oversees the commercial side of the CMU media, leading on sales and sponsorship, plus helps manage and deliver the CMU Insights training courses and consultancy services.
Email sam@unlimitedmedia.co.uk or call 020 7099 9060
   
CARO MOSES | Co-Publisher
Caro helps oversee the CMU media, while as a Director of 3CM UnLimited she heads up the company's other two titles ThisWeek London and ThreeWeeks Edinburgh, and supports other parts of the business.
Email caro@unlimitedmedia.co.uk
Send ALL press releases to musicnews@unlimitedmedia.co.uk - this is checked daily by the whole editorial team meaning your release will definitely get to the right person.

For details of the training and consultancy services offered by CMU Insights click here - Andy and Chris are also available to provide music business comment, just email them direct.

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