WEDNESDAY 19 AUGUST 2015
TODAY'S TOP STORY: So this is fun. Kim Dotcom has posted a recording of a phone call he had with some Universal Music execs a few years ago in which the major label men – major foes of the MegaUpload founder, remember – discuss the possibility of participating in a new venture he was experimenting with at the time called Megakey. Dotcom claims that the conversation took place just two... [READ MORE]
 
TODAY'S APPROVED: Each day this month we are looking at some of the shows, performers and events being championed at the Edinburgh Festival this year by our sister magazine ThreeWeeks. Today 'Drum Tribe' at the Gilded Balloon. Says our reviewer: "'Welcome to Drum Tribe, here's your bongo', now that's a good way to start a day. My hands still hurt and my ears are ringing, but it was worth... [READ MORE]
 
CMU PODCAST: CMU’s Andy Malt and Chris Cooke review the week in music and the music business, including big tech accusing the MPAA of trying to resurrect the controversial SOPA web-blocking scheme in the US through the back door, Dr Luke’s breakbeat infringement case, why iTunes is no more illegal than it ever was, and Prince comparing record deals to slavery. The CMU Podcast is sponsored by 7digital... [LISTEN HERE]
TOP STORIES Kim Dotcom posts pre-MegaUpload shutdown chat with Universal where collaboration is on the agenda
JUMP | ONLINE
LEGAL Movie industry drops web-block injunction request from MovieTube case
Simon Napier-Bell responds to Sinéad O'Connor allegations over live income
JUMP | ONLINE
LIVE BUSINESS Future of The Troubadour looking secure under new owner
UTA reportedly in advanced talks to buy The Agency Group
JUMP | ONLINE
DIGITAL & D2F SERVICES Deezer seeking new finance, IPO not ruled out
Baboom finally goes live, plays with the streaming music model
JUMP | ONLINE
ONE LINERS Danger Mouse's label, Brian Eno's speech, Warner's chart brag, and other nonsense
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AND FINALLY... 5 Seconds Of Summer comment on MCR song comparisons
JUMP | ONLINE
 
Click JUMP to skip direct to a section of this email or ONLINE to read and share stories on the CMU website (JUMP option may not work in all email readers). For regular updates from Team CMU follow us on Twitter, Facebook or Tumblr.
 
 
PARAMOUNT ARTISTS - BOOKING AGENT (BRIGHTON)
Paramount Artists is a booking agency based in central Brighton. We arrange worldwide tours for DJ’s and electronic musicians. We are looking to expand our team and currently have an opening for a booking agent.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
MAMA & COMPANY - ASSISTANT GENERAL MANAGERS, ARTS CLUB, LIVERPOOL; HOXTON SQUARE BAR & KITCHEN AND THE BORDERLINE, LONDON (TEMPORARY CONTRACT)
MAMA & Company are looking for a dynamic, experienced Assistant General Managers with a proven track record within a live music operation to work at Arts Club, Liverpool and at our London venues. This is a fantastic opportunity to work and grow with an exciting company that owns some of London’s most established venues.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
MAMA & COMPANY - ASSISTANT BAR MANAGERS, LONDON VENUES
MAMA & Company is looking for Assistant Bar Managers for its London venues. You will have some experience of maximising bar, cloakroom and other revenues while minimising all relevant costs. You will have exceptional stock and staff management and must be driven to achieve the best results for the venue in support of the Bars Manager. Some experience of duty management within a live music venue would be beneficial.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
MAMA & COMPANY - PROMOTIONAL MANAGER - ARTS CLUB (LIVERPOOL)
MAMA & Company are looking for a dynamic Promotional Manager ideally with some experience within a live music operation to work at Arts Club, Liverpool. This is a fantastic opportunity to work and grow with an exciting company that owns some of the UK’s most established venues.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
OUTPOST - GRADUATE TRAINEE OPPORTUNITY (PUBLISHING & DISTRIBUTION) (LONDON)
Fast growing music company is looking for a sharp graduate to join our team on our three month paid Graduate Trainee Scheme. Working in our publishing and distribution departments, you will also gain first-hand experience in our PR department, working across print, online, radio and TV. Training in general office management will also form part of the role.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
MUSIC CONCIERGE - CLIENT SERVICES MANAGER (HERTFORD)
Music Concierge, the award-winning music consultancy for boutique hotels and luxury brands, is looking for a Client Services Manager to manage our expanding creative and account management teams and oversee the smooth day-to-day operations of the business, whilst liaising at senior level with world-class brands.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
THE ORCHARD - ACCOUNT CO-ORDINATOR, VIDEO SERVICES (LONDON)
As an Account Co-ordinator in the Video Services department, you are vital in helping to scale our fast growing Video Services business in Europe; executing on a value proposition that drives client satisfaction, engagement and revenue. You are a positive, smart, creative and analytical forward-thinker, and an Orchard evangelist in and outside of the company.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
AIR ARTIST AGENCY - PERSONAL ASSISTANT (LONDON)
Air Artist Agency is an innovative live music agency. The agency represents the cream of today's jazz musicians, cutting edge innovators and mainstream established artists. With an extensive worldwide network of contacts, we book for emerging talents as well as established artists. We are looking for a personal assistant to one of our directors.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
AUDIO NETWORK - PRODUCT AND A&R MANAGER (LONDON)
Working in our London office, we are looking for a music industry professional with passion and experience to join the Audio Network Music Team, primarily as cross discipline (B2B and B2C) Product Manager but also in support of all A&R functions.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
 
CMU Jobs is a proven way to recruit the best music business talent for roles across the industry at all levels, from graduate to senior management. To book an ad contact Sam on 020 7099 9060 or email ads@unlimitedmedia.co.uk
 

Kim Dotcom posts pre-MegaUpload shutdown chat with Universal where collaboration is on the agenda
So this is fun. Kim Dotcom has posted a recording of a phone call he had with some Universal Music execs a few years ago in which the major label men – major foes of the MegaUpload founder, remember – discuss the possibility of participating in a new venture he was experimenting with at the time called Megakey.

Dotcom claims that the conversation took place just two days before the US authorities – following complaints by the major record companies and movie studios – swooped and shut down the entire MegaUpload business. Dotcom, of course, is still fighting extradition from New Zealand to America, where he faces charges of money laundering, racketeering and copyright infringement in relation to his former business.

In the run up to the MegaUpload shutdown, Dotcom had a separate dispute ongoing with Universal over the good old 'Mega Song'. Remember that? "MegaUpload, Mega, Mega, MegaUpload". Ha, it's stuck in your head again now. Or if it isn't, click here. Then it will be. Universal had issued a takedown request to YouTube over that song, but it turned out that it didn't have any right to do so, and Dotcom was suing them for misuse of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act as a result.

The 'Mega Song' was embarrassing for the US record industry, which was busy trying to talk down Dotcom's business at the time, because it featured a stack of top name artists singing along about how great MegaUpload was. Though, it seems from Dotcom's now published phone call, it wasn't just artists schmoozing the Mega chief.

In the conversation, which presumably Dotcom wasn't meant to record, let alone make public three and half years later, Universal execs are heard expressing an interest in Megakey, a potentially controversial bit of software that would replace ads on web pages with banners controlled by the Mega group. Web users allowing Megakey ads to appear would then be rewarded with free music, while artists and labels would be paid a cut of ad income. Users would also be profiled and data potentially shared.

Noting that such an initiative would be controversial, because it would somehow replace ads that web page owners had themselves placed, both Dotcom and the label men agree during the call that the whole thing would have to start off slowly, replacing just 10% of the ads a participating user sees with those sourced by Megakey.

Dotcom also suggests initially only replacing ads that had been serviced to a web page by Google because, you know, those guys are profiting big time from your content already without fairly sharing out the money they make with rights owners, so screw them. "I completely agree," responds one Universal man.

There is then some chatter about what Universal's lawyers would make of the major working with Dotcom, though the execs seem keen to collaborate and do what they can to keep their angry legal team out of the proceedings wherever possible. Dotcom also says he would try and dilute his legal attack on Universal over the 'Mega Song' in return, which does seem to time the conversation to just before the big MegaUpload shutdown.

So, that's all fun. Quite why Dotcom has released this recording now isn't really clear, given making it public outside the courtroom doesn't really help his legal case at all, and indeed, could open him up to new allegations of breaching laws on confidentiality. Some reckon it was timed to coincide with the launch of Baboom, the direct-to-fan service he founded which – at one point – he suggested would make record companies redundant. So was the aim to make the biggest record company of them all seem even more devious and sinister?

Actually, Universal could argue that the recording shows that its people are not blind to innovative new business models even where legal issues exist with the innovators. Though by 2012, MegaUpload was almost certainly on the same list as LimeWire and Grooveshark, as services the top guard at the mega-major just wanted out of business. The Google dissing is perhaps a little embarrassing for Universal, though that the record industry has a love hate relationship with the web giant is no secret.

Either way, this conversation – and its publication - is yet another interesting twist in the very long-running Music Industry v Dotcom saga. And it will fit in perfectly when I get round to turning that saga into an opera.

Movie industry drops web-block injunction request from MovieTube case
The Motion Picture Association Of America has dropped its request for a preliminary injunction that would require internet service providers in the US to block access to the copyright infringing MovieTube.

The Hollywood trade group says that the web-blocks are not now needed because the MovieTube sites have been offline for several weeks anyway. The group's lawyers added that: "Plaintiffs are no longer seeking preliminary injunctive relief at this time but will seek permanent relief as soon as possible".

The preliminary injunction element of the MPAA's litigation against Movietube was the most interesting bit for two reasons. First, while now the norm in many European countries, web-blocking has not been allowed as an anti-piracy tactic in the US to date, not least because Congress rejected specific web-blocking proposals set out in the proposed SOPA and PIPA acts in 2012. Second, the MPAA was looking for search engines as well as ISPs to block access to Movietube sites.

As previously reported, the MPAA's request for a web-blocking injunction motivated various big tech firms in the US to submit a document to the court – despite not being party to the case – arguing that the movie industry's proposed injunction was far to wide-ranging, and that granting it would go against the wishes of Congress given the whole SOPA debate.

The movie industry's trade body doesn't specifically state that its change of heart here is motivated by that submission, but you don't need to be much of a cynic to assume the two things are very much connected. Not least because the MPAA's lawyers say that, because they've withdrawn the request for preliminary injunction, that letter from big tech should now be disregarded.

Whether calls for web-blocking will return as this case goes through the motions remains to be seen. Certainly it is thought the MPAA is still keen to get web-blocking underway in the US, and its counterpart in music – the RIAA – would be sure to follow in filing web-blocking actions against a plethora of piracy sites if Hollywood was able to set any kind of web-blocking precedent in an American court.

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Simon Napier-Bell responds to Sinéad O'Connor allegations over live income
Artist manager Simon Napier-Bell yesterday issued a statement in response to Facebook posts made by his now seemingly former client Sinéad O'Connor, about monies that have been generated by her recent live activity.

In her posts, O'Connor, who had to cancel a South American tour because of issues around her health, and that of her son, claims that she was misled by her agent as to who should take financial responsibility for the cancelled dates. She then accuses her agent of also ripping her off on those concerts that did go ahead.

And while it is her former booking agent that O'Connor directs most of the anger and allegations towards, she goes on to claim that these arrangements went ahead "with the full (written, and totally behind my back, without my knowledge) support of Simon Napier Bell, Bjorn De Water and my now ex accountant. ALL of whom need to lawyer up, and get ready for the fraud squad".

Responding to those allegations, Napier Bell began by expressing much respect for the singer, writing yesterday: "Since last November my partner, Bjorn de Water, and I have managed Sinéad O'Connor. She's an amazing, forceful, vibrant artist - opinionated, socially concerned and full of fire. Her last album contained some of the best songs she's ever written, and she's in the middle of writing a book about her life which is astonishingly well-constructed and observed".

He went on: "She also writes frequently on Facebook; sometimes fiery rants, other times about music she likes or people she respects. For some time now she's been telling her Facebook friends about problems with her health, her son's ill-health, and about her financial losses from having had to cancel a South American tour in order to stay behind and take care of him. Fate and circumstance came together to cause these things to happen and throughout them Bjorn and I gave Sinéad carefully considered advice and acted with honesty and integrity".

Then dealing with the allegations head on, he continued: "Earlier this week Sinéad wrote a post that accused us of doing otherwise. It was untrue, defamatory, and damaging. Through our lawyer we applied to Facebook to have the post removed. If it is, then without prejudice to our right to take further legal action for defamation if we feel it necessary, our preferred choice would be to leave things at that. We've enjoyed working with Sinéad - she's a great artist, a caring mother, and for nine months was a good friend".

As yet O'Connor's posts remain on Facebook, so it remains to be seen if this matter goes legal, from either side.

Future of The Troubadour looking secure under new owner
The future of West London music café The Troubadour is looking more secure after an existing shareholder in the venue stepped in and bought it outright, with the intention of keeping the operation under its current management and therefore ensuring live music will continue to be a key part of the business.

As previously reported, former owners Simon and Susie Thornhill announced last month that they were putting the venue up for sale because trading conditions had become very tricky in recent years. Simon Thornhill told the Evening Standard: "It's got tougher and tougher. You see it happening everywhere with music venues struggling to survive. Everything is going up and up but people won't pay more for live music". He added that a 2012 noise abatement order from the local council had further hindered things.

But existing shareholder Giles McNamee has now taken over control of the café venue, which has been in operation since 1954, and has pledged to invest into the space and to keep the Thornhills in charge day to day. He told reporters: "Nothing makes me happier than deepening my existing, long-term commitment to The Troubadour".

He went on: "Simon and Susie have done a wonderful job under exceptionally challenging circumstances at keeping The Troubadour open, authentic, and full of the spirit in which it was founded over 60 years ago. As anyone who has crossed the threshold of The Troubadour knows, the venue is rich in energy and inspiration and I'm thrilled to play a larger role now in its continuation and future health".

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UTA reportedly in advanced talks to buy The Agency Group
Having been busy busy buying up other booking agencies over the years, rumour has it The Agency Group may now be bought itself, by the United Talent Agency, which seemingly wants to boost its credentials in music, it being generally better known for representing actors and writers.

Some of those pesky sources have told Billboard that negotiations for UTA to acquire TAG are now at an advanced stage. While making UTA a major player in music overnight, the deal would presumably pay healthy dividends to TAG's owners, vindicating their ambitious expansion strategy of recent years. Needless to say, neither side in the deal-making have as yet commented.

Deezer seeking new finance, IPO not ruled out
Deezer is seeking new finance, according to Bloomberg, with a pitch to potential backers that values the streaming service at around one billion euros, or so say some of those "people familiar with the matter".

It's Deezer's first round of fundraising since 2012, when Warner Music owner Access Industries was amongst those which threw in some cash. The streaming music market remains very challenging, of course, with digital service providers having to make significant royalty guarantees to rights owners while also funding rapid worldwide expansion, plus there's an increased need to spend on marketing as high profile and well-funded new competitors like Apple enter the marketplace.

For most of the main players in the market, critical mass is key for their business models to become viable long-term, and Deezer is significantly behind its main rival Spotify is signing up both freemium and premium users, despite being in many more markets and making much of its 'local editorial' to help users navigate all the music on its platform.

Though like Spotify, bosses at Deezer seem certain that partnerships with tel cos and other tech partners are the way to build a mass audience, and the France-based firm has done plenty of decent deals in this domain over the years.

While you might expect Deezer, like its competitors, to raise this next round of cash from private investors, Bloomberg's sources say an initial public offering on one or another stock exchange hasn't been completely rejected as an option at this stage, which would be interesting, given all the speculation of late has been about a Spotify flotation, not a Deezer one. The outcome of a Deezer IPO would be very interesting indeed.

Deezer hasn't commented on the rumours as yet.

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Baboom finally goes live, plays with the streaming music model
"Baboom!" I said "Baboom!" I have to admit I do like saying "Baboom!" Go on, say it, "Baboom!" It's phonetically satisfying. I think it's having the two voiced bilabial stops so quickly followed by a voiced bilabial nasal that does it. I love the bilabial speech sounds, and I don't care who knows it.

But while the rather-long-in-development direct-to-fan platform Baboom did very well indeed in picking a name, what about the product? Because however great your name, someone's always going to bring it back to the product. Which is just as well really, given CMU's a bit of a rubbish name, but I like to think a very fine product.

Anyway, the Kim Dotcom-founded Baboom – which began life as the decidedly lame sounding Megabox – has finally gone live. The venture was already under development when the US authorities shut down Dotcom's file-transfer service MegaUpload back in 2012.

And I'm pretty sure that at one point Dotcom suggested that it was because he was developing a super duper direct-to-fan platform - that would clearly render all record labels redundant - that the record industry was so keen to shut him down. Even though there are already plenty of super duper direct-to-fan platforms, none of which have rendered record labels redundant.

Dotcom's D2F service has evolved quite a bit since then though, not least by parting company with the MegaUpload founder himself, despite using his lovely pop songs to showcase the in-development platform at the start of 2014.

The most interesting bit of the now live Baboom is the streaming element, in that it messes around with the model that has become pretty standard elsewhere in the streaming music domain. For starters, the freemium option only gives users access to one hundred tracks at any one time and some content will be restricted to premium-users only.

Meanwhile each premium user's subscription money will be divvied up between the artists that user specifically listens to, rather than being put into a central pot, from which rights owners and artists are paid based on consumption share across the whole service in any one month.

So if I pay $10 and only listen to one artist that month - and that artist has a 'pro' account with Baboom which pays them a 90% cut - then $9 is allocated to that artist's 'pot' (minus a 51c transaction fee), even if no one else listens to that artist's music at all. It's an alternative approach to streaming royalties that has come up at a fair few music conferences in recent months.

The challenge for Baboom as a streaming service is getting content, given it's not seeking to do big catalogue-wide deals with the record companies, but rather to persuade artists that this is a platform via which to connect with their fans. Many signed artists can't just decide to plonk their label-released content on any new platform, and those artists in control of their catalogue may be wary of shifting from, or competing with, the D2F channels they have already built, say on a Music Glue or Bandcamp.

Baboom is attempting to overcome this to an extent by offering users a digital locker as part of their account, so they can add to music that actually appears on the D2F platform with tracks from their own MP3 collection.

It's not entirely clear as yet how Baboom is licensing that key element for user experience – ie is it arguing, as other digital lockers have before, that users are just utilising their private copy right when they upload tracks to the locker, so no licences from rights owners are required. Or are there deals in the pipeline with the labels and publishers. A partnership has been struck with Aussie collecting society APRA/AMCOS, though it's not entirely clear what that covers.

But either way, despite the challenges ahead, it is interesting to see Baboom experiment with alternative approaches to streaming music – both consumer-facing and behind the scenes – given it's far from assured that the business model being used elsewhere in the streaming sector is the right one.

Says Baboom's Head Of Content Mikee Tucker: "We have created a solution that will attract quality independent artists and labels. Greater returns, direct payments, fair trade streaming and an innovative royalty engine are some of the key factors that will drive uptake from artists. We are here for the long game and the quality niche content that will be attracted to Baboom will in turn attract the fans".

  From The Fringe: Drum Tribe
Each day this month we are looking at some of the shows, performers and events being championed at the Edinburgh Festival this year by our sister magazine ThreeWeeks.

Today 'Drum Tribe' at the Gilded Balloon. Says our reviewer: "'Welcome to Drum Tribe, here's your bongo', now that's a good way to start a day. My hands still hurt and my ears are ringing, but it was worth it for this raucous hour of percussion and dance, courtesy of four preposterously talented South Africans".

He goes on: "The consummate polyrhythmic skill on display is a joy, and the engaging quartet do a grand job of rousing the audience to participate. The only minor problem is that it could use some variety – an hour of call-and-response is a lot to take, and I'd have loved more like the astounding tuned percussion solo we see early on".

But that didn't stop our man giving the Drum Tribe a 4/5 rating. "One last thing" he warned anyone planning on checking out this show, which runs at the Fringe until 31 Aug, "if you can drum, know that above-average competence may have consequences. That's all I'll say".
CLICK HERE for the ThreeWeeks website
 

Danger Mouse's label, Brian Eno's speech, Warner's chart brag, and other nonsense

Other notable announcements and developments today...

• Remember how I mentioned Danger Mouse was launching a label with Sony's Columbia Records. You do remember, right? Because I definitely mentioned it. Well, Danger Mouse is launching a label with Sony's Columbia Records. It's called 30th Century Records. And it will release a new record from Autolux and everything.

• We don't normally do anything with the simple 'brag releases' that occasionally come in from this music company or that, though Warner Music's brag that it released every record in the Swedish album top ten this week, well that might be noteworthy. Or perhaps it tells us more about the Swedish album top ten. But well done one and all, but mainly the charting Warner artists Lasse Stefanz, Ed Sheeran, Hasse Andersson, Mans Zelmerlow, Jason Derulo, Major Lazer, Ulf Lundell, Flo Rida, Galantis and David Guetta.

• You know that gig subscription app called Jukely? Yeah? No? Well, it's a gig subscription app. Don't know what that means? Well, they've just been announced as headline sponsor for the next Venues Day event, which takes place at Ministry Of Sound on 20 Oct. So go to that and ask them.

• Brian Eno will deliver the annual John Peel Lecture as part of the Radio Festival next month. The wider event has been streamlined this year and will take place on just one day in London on 27 Sep. Eno will examine "the ecology of culture" during his speech, which will also be broadcast by 6 Music.

• A new The Dead Weather album is coming not only my way but also your way next month, on 25 Sep to be precise, via Jack White's own Third Man Records, naturally. Speaking to Annie Mac on Radio 1 this week, fellow Dead Weatherer Alison Mosshart says of 'Dodge & Burn': "It feels so good to put music out into the world, it's the best feeling ever. I'm really happy that we have things for people to hear, something new".

• Julian Casablancas off of The Strokes has cancelled a planned North America tour with his other band The Voidz because, and I quote, "we had set out to do something a bit different with these shows and create more of an experience that would be inspiring to our fans as well as to the band. In order to make this work we needed many pieces to fall into place that just didn't".

• So what would it be like if Josh Groban put the tweets of Donald Trump to music? Like this, that's what.

5 Seconds Of Summer comment on MCR song comparisons
5 Seconds Of Summer's Michael Clifford has conceded that his band's latest single 'She's Kinda Hot' does sound a bit like My Chemical Romance's 2006 song 'Teenagers'. Which is something people have been saying a bit of late, see.

But it's all down to the "12-bar blues" says the guitarist. Which, as I'm sure you all know, is one of the most prominent chord progressions in popular music. And that's where the similarities start and stop. Oh, and the two records might be in the same key.

But anyway, Clifford told Billboard, "People were like, 'You guys should sound more like My Chemical Romance'. Then we do sound like My Chemical Romance and people are like, 'Why the fuck do you sound like My Chemical Romance?' Ugh!"

 
ANDY MALT | Editor
Andy heads up the team, overseeing the CMU bulletin and website, coordinating features and interviews, reporting on artist and business stories, and contributing to the CMU Approved column.
Email andy@unlimitedmedia.co.uk (except press releases, see below)
   
CHRIS COOKE | MD & Business Editor
Chris provides music business coverage and analysis. Chris also leads the CMU Insights training and consultancy business and education programme CMU:DIY, and heads up CMU publisher 3CM UnLimited.
Email chris@unlimitedmedia.co.uk (except press releases, see below)
   
SAM TAYLOR | Commercial Manager & Insights Associate
Sam oversees the commercial side of the CMU media, leading on sales and sponsorship, plus helps manage and deliver the CMU Insights training courses and consultancy services.
Email sam@unlimitedmedia.co.uk or call 020 7099 9060
   
CARO MOSES | Co-Publisher
Caro helps oversee the CMU media, while as a Director of 3CM UnLimited she heads up the company's other two titles ThisWeek London and ThreeWeeks Edinburgh, and supports other parts of the business.
Email caro@unlimitedmedia.co.uk
Send ALL press releases to musicnews@unlimitedmedia.co.uk - this is checked daily by the whole editorial team meaning your release will definitely get to the right person.

For details of the training and consultancy services offered by CMU Insights click here - Andy and Chris are also available to provide music business comment, just email them direct.

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