THURSDAY 20 AUGUST 2015
TODAY'S TOP STORY: The word 'payola' has been back on the lips of record industry execs with increased frequency of late, amidst chatter that some in the business are now paying the owners of influential playlists on the big streaming platforms to include their new records in their lists. Online playlists, of course, have become an important way of getting new music onto the radar of consumers using... [READ MORE]
 
TODAY'S APPROVED: Each day this month we are looking at some of the shows, performers and events being championed at the Edinburgh Festival this year by our sister magazine ThreeWeeks. And today some comedy at last, because yesterday at the Fringe former Xfm DJ Marsha Shandur - who you might remember for her brilliant 'Marsha Meets' comedy podcast back in the day - launched a new... [READ MORE]
 
CMU PODCAST: CMU's Andy Malt and Chris Cooke review the week in music and the music business, including big tech accusing the MPAA of trying to resurrect the controversial SOPA web-blocking scheme in the US through the back door, Dr Luke’s breakbeat infringement case, why iTunes is no more illegal than it ever was, and Prince comparing record deals to slavery. The CMU Podcast is sponsored by 7digital... [LISTEN HERE]
TOP STORIES New Spotify terms seek to crack down on playlist payola
JUMP | ONLINE
LEGAL Dr Dre and Ice Cube request removal from lawsuit relating to Suge Knight homicide case
JUMP | ONLINE
DEALS SESAC to represent Green Day's performing rights
JUMP | ONLINE
DIGITAL & D2F SERVICES SoundCloud no longer providing data to Next Big Sound
Apple Music disputes 'half of users no longer streaming' stat
JUMP | ONLINE
MEDIA Artists remain angry over Russian radio group being taken into state ownership
NUJ hits out at Notting Hill Carnival's press accreditation fees
JUMP | ONLINE
ARTIST NEWS Morrissey chats more about illness and airport fracas
Lacklustre Coldplay performance inspired Interpol's Carlos D to quit music
JUMP | ONLINE
AND FINALLY... Extra security needed next to provocative Nicki Minaj waxwork after saucy photos go viral
JUMP | ONLINE
 
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PARAMOUNT ARTISTS - BOOKING AGENT (BRIGHTON)
Paramount Artists is a booking agency based in central Brighton. We arrange worldwide tours for DJ’s and electronic musicians. We are looking to expand our team and currently have an opening for a booking agent.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
MAMA & COMPANY - ASSISTANT GENERAL MANAGERS, ARTS CLUB, LIVERPOOL; HOXTON SQUARE BAR & KITCHEN AND THE BORDERLINE, LONDON (TEMPORARY CONTRACT)
MAMA & Company are looking for a dynamic, experienced Assistant General Managers with a proven track record within a live music operation to work at Arts Club, Liverpool and at our London venues. This is a fantastic opportunity to work and grow with an exciting company that owns some of London’s most established venues.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
MAMA & COMPANY - ASSISTANT BAR MANAGERS, LONDON VENUES
MAMA & Company is looking for Assistant Bar Managers for its London venues. You will have some experience of maximising bar, cloakroom and other revenues while minimising all relevant costs. You will have exceptional stock and staff management and must be driven to achieve the best results for the venue in support of the Bars Manager. Some experience of duty management within a live music venue would be beneficial.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
MAMA & COMPANY - PROMOTIONAL MANAGER - ARTS CLUB (LIVERPOOL)
MAMA & Company are looking for a dynamic Promotional Manager ideally with some experience within a live music operation to work at Arts Club, Liverpool. This is a fantastic opportunity to work and grow with an exciting company that owns some of the UK’s most established venues.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
OUTPOST - GRADUATE TRAINEE OPPORTUNITY (PUBLISHING & DISTRIBUTION) (LONDON)
Fast growing music company is looking for a sharp graduate to join our team on our three month paid Graduate Trainee Scheme. Working in our publishing and distribution departments, you will also gain first-hand experience in our PR department, working across print, online, radio and TV. Training in general office management will also form part of the role.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
MUSIC CONCIERGE - CLIENT SERVICES MANAGER (HERTFORD)
Music Concierge, the award-winning music consultancy for boutique hotels and luxury brands, is looking for a Client Services Manager to manage our expanding creative and account management teams and oversee the smooth day-to-day operations of the business, whilst liaising at senior level with world-class brands.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
THE ORCHARD - ACCOUNT CO-ORDINATOR, VIDEO SERVICES (LONDON)
As an Account Co-ordinator in the Video Services department, you are vital in helping to scale our fast growing Video Services business in Europe; executing on a value proposition that drives client satisfaction, engagement and revenue. You are a positive, smart, creative and analytical forward-thinker, and an Orchard evangelist in and outside of the company.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
AIR ARTIST AGENCY - PERSONAL ASSISTANT (LONDON)
Air Artist Agency is an innovative live music agency. The agency represents the cream of today's jazz musicians, cutting edge innovators and mainstream established artists. With an extensive worldwide network of contacts, we book for emerging talents as well as established artists. We are looking for a personal assistant to one of our directors.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
AUDIO NETWORK - PRODUCT AND A&R MANAGER (LONDON)
Working in our London office, we are looking for a music industry professional with passion and experience to join the Audio Network Music Team, primarily as cross discipline (B2B and B2C) Product Manager but also in support of all A&R functions.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
 
CMU Jobs is a proven way to recruit the best music business talent for roles across the industry at all levels, from graduate to senior management. To book an ad contact Sam on 020 7099 9060 or email ads@unlimitedmedia.co.uk
 

New Spotify terms seek to crack down on playlist payola
The word 'payola' has been back on the lips of record industry execs with increased frequency of late, amidst chatter that some in the business are now paying the owners of influential playlists on the big streaming platforms to include their new records in their lists.

Online playlists, of course, have become an important way of getting new music onto the radar of consumers using streaming platforms, ensuring initial and repeating listening of tracks, which then provides a boost in royalties for the rights owner and artist. Although the digital services and labels themselves control some of the most influential playlists, others are run by media, journalists, DJs and, importantly, random punters.

As previously noted, an increased effort is now being made to PR these playlist owners to get new tracks listed, and earlier this month Universal Music announced an alliance with one of the leading players in this space, Jay Frank's DigMark. But is this new playlist marketing effort just about PRing playlist owners in the traditional way, or is money changing hands? At CMU @ The Great Escape earlier this year DigMark's Aileen Crowley said that her company had made occasional payments to playlist owners, and some in the room said this seemed like a good use of marketing budgets.

But, of course, payments to influence playlisting are always controversial in music circles, bringing back memories of rampant radio 'payola' back in the day. It clearly gives an advantage to those labels and artists with bigger budgets, and potentially damages the credibility of the playlists that are secretly accepting payment, if said payments become public knowledge.

Though some might argue that if that's a risk a playlist owner is willing to take, so what? After all, label-owned playlists are already popular and clearly skew (mainly or exclusively) towards tracks that that record company has released, so if another playlist wants to favour a label in return for payment, is that really any different?

Critics might argue that there is a kind of dishonesty when playlists secretly accept payment to showcase tracks, whereas a label-owned playlist is open about its biases (though not all label-owned playlists are immediately obvious as such to the average punter).

Either way, one American label source has told Billboard that playlist payola is now 'a thing', indicating fees are being paid considerably higher than those alluded to by Crowley at CMU@TGE. "The price can range from $2000 for a playlist with tens of thousands of fans to $10,000 for the more well-followed playlists" says the source.

Unlike with radio, where payola routinely breaks broadcasting rules, online such activity isn't usually illegal, though according to Billboard's sources, the digital service providers are starting to become opinionated on the practice. And indeed Spotify's Jonathan Prince told the trade mag that its new terms of service will prohibit "accepting any ?compensation, financial or otherwise, to influence ... the content included on an account or playlist".

Though quite how such terms can be enforced - especially if rights owners fudge things by saying they pay playlist owners to listen to their new music, rather than to explicitly list it - isn't clear.

And, of course, the issue remains that for media, pundits and individuals making playlists on platforms like Spotify - who are arguably now providing much value to the DSPs, labels and users - there isn't actually any way to make money out of that pursuit without accepting payola bungs. Which brings us to the suggestion that has been made in some quarters of late that playlist creators delivering real value should perhaps receive a royalty from the DSPs.

Though even if that does happen, this all-new payola debate seems likely to rumble on for the foreseeable.

Dr Dre and Ice Cube request removal from lawsuit relating to Suge Knight homicide case
Dr Dre and Ice Cube have demanded they be removed from a civil lawsuit that has stemmed from that incident earlier this year when one time Deathrow Records boss Suge Knight drove a vehicle into two men, killing one of them.

As previously reported, Knight is facing criminal charges in relation to the incident that took place back in January. It's claimed he deliberately drove his pickup truck into Cle Sloan and Terry Carter, killing the latter, after an altercation outside a burger bar in LA.

In the civil action filed in June by Carter's widow, it is stated that the altercation – as we already suspected - began on a nearby film set where a commercial for the new NWA biopic 'Straight Outta Compton' was being filmed.

Carter's legal papers say that Sloan had been hired to recruit local gang members to participate in the film shoot, as extras and security. Both Dre and Cube were present at the filming, which caused problems when Knight – who has long feuded with Dre, of course – also showed up, seemingly to berate those working on the movie over his portrayal in the biopic.

Dre then seemingly requested that Sloan remove Knight from the site, which resulted in a fracas that then continued a few miles away outside that burger bar. It is thought Carter had accompanied Sloan to play peacemaker.

The lawsuit claims that the film's makers, and Dre and Cube individually, should take some responsibility for the resulting incident, and therefore Carter's death, because had they not insisted Sloan remove Knight from the shoot the resulting altercation would not have taken place.

But in a legal filing last week, Dre and Cube's reps said that their clients could not have been expected to foresee that their request that Knight be removed from the set would "create undue risks for anyone, let alone Carter". Indeed, the purpose of the request was to prevent more foreseeable conflict at the film shoot itself.

According to Billboard, Dre and Cube's motion says of Carter's litigation: "The risk that Suge might leave the [film shoot] and proceed to his fatal confrontation with Carter was no more foreseeable than the possibility that Suge would injure or kill someone else if he had been permitted to stay".

It remains to be seen if the courts now remove the two former NWA men as defendants from this case.

SESAC to represent Green Day's performing rights
The smaller of America's performing rights organisations, SESAC, yesterday announced it was now representing Green Day, whose performing rights previously sat with its bigger rival ASCAP.

Confirming the new recruits, SESAC CEO John Josephson told reporters: "Green Day are an iconic band that has created important, diverse and unforgettable records. Billie Joe, Mike and Tre are phenomenal songwriters and musicians whose influence on the musical landscape is immeasurable. We are thrilled and humbled to welcome them to the SESAC family".

For their part, the band said in a statement: "We are thrilled to be signed to SESAC and excited to partner with them for the next phase of our musical adventure".

SoundCloud no longer providing data to Next Big Sound
No real surprise here, but it's been confirmed that SoundCloud has stopped sharing its stats with music data firm Next Big Sound.

That's not surprising because Next Big Sound was acquired by Pandora back in May, and we've seen this before: buzzy music-data-crunching agency gets bought by one or another digital service provider, insists it's business as usual, but the other digital service providers that previously gave it access to backroom stats start to bail.

After Next Big Sound announced on Twitter that SoundCloud is no longer providing it with stats, a spokesman for the latter told Music Ally: "Since SoundCloud's beginning we've focused on building an ecosystem where creativity thrives. That creativity includes developers who have built innovative services using SoundCloud's API. With the recent acquisition of Next Big Sound by Pandora, we have decided, as a normal course of business, that the time has come for Next Big Sound to discontinue using SoundCloud's API".

With the big two music data start-ups – Musicmetric and Next Big Sound – now owned by major players in digital music, Apple and Pandora respectively, plus, of course, Spotify bought that other interesting data-based music firm Echo Nest, there is arguably a gap in the market for a new neutral music data business.

Though would that new firm have to make some commitment to clients and data providers on both the music and digital sides that it won't ultimately sell out to one big digital player – or a major music company for that matter – giving competitors ownership of music and business intelligence said clients and providers helped gather?

But then again, if you're setting up a music data start-up, is there a long-term business model that doesn't involve being bought up and becoming the in-house insights team at a music or digital company with other revenue streams?

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Apple Music disputes 'half of users no longer streaming' stat
Hey everybody, stop saying that no one is using Apple Music.

Stop saying that half of the eleven million people Apple claims to have signed up actually tuned out on day one and have been in counselling every since.

Stop saying half of all Apple Music users immediately declared "what the fuck is this shit, can't I just have another mind-numbingly dull U2 album instead?"

Stop saying that the new Dre album is only scoring impressive streaming stats because every member of staff at Apple has been ordered to play it on a loop.

Stop saying that this whole shambles will just end up being the most expensive launch of an old school radio station in history.

Stop saying that the music industry's grand hope that Apple could take streaming mainstream has already fallen on its ass, and frankly we're all fucked, so let's just ride the wave into oblivion and assume we'll all be out of work and homeless by Christmas.

Stop saying that not only is the Apple Music experience pretty lacklustre, but the playlists I spent hours curating on iTunes are no longer there, which makes playing my existing MP3 collection no fun at all, so I've started just listening to Radio 4 documentaries on the BBC iPlayer instead.

Because NONE of those things are true. Apart from the last one.

Anyway, Apple has responded to a piece of research by a guy called Russ Crupnick at a company called MusicWatch, in which he estimated – based on a survey of 5000 US consumers earlier this month – that 48% of the people who had signed up for the tech giant's new streaming service and tried it out but were no longer actively using it.

Not true, say the Apple men to The Verge. 79% of those who signed up for Apple Music are still happily streaming away, thank you very much kind sir. "So that Crupnick cunt can fuck off", they didn't add.

So there you go. It has to be said, those in the know at the labels seem to remain happy with Apple Music's user and streaming numbers, and that the new player in the market isn't cannibalising either download sales or subscriber numbers on rival platforms. So job done. Though everyone still awaits the end of the big three month free trial at the start of October, when the real test begins, will the early adopters start paying?

Artists remain angry over Russian radio group being taken into state ownership
Controversy continues in Russia over the move to take the Russkaya Media Group, and the music radio stations and TV channel it operates, into state ownership, through an acquisition by state-run concert promoter Goskontsert, which reports into the country's Ministry Of Culture.

As previously reported, a number of high profile Russian artists hit out at the move, which was seen as part of a plan to promote more patriotic music and musicians, and to develop and support "ideologically correct" pop idols with the goal of ensuring popular support for Russia's leadership. Critics pointed out that RMG already operated one station that exclusively plays Russian-language songs, and that many prominent Russian musicians are plenty patriotic enough already.

Those critics wanted President Putin to intervene and stop the transfer of ownership, but he said he didn't have the power to do so, and the transaction has now gone ahead. Though controversy continues. And while some artists have seemingly embraced the deal, those who had criticised the move are now talking about boycotting RMG channels and setting up their own radio station.

Once the Goskontsert acquisition was green-lighted, RMG's General Director and minority shareholder Sergei Kozhevnikov - who had opposed the acquisition - was quickly replaced by another man called Sergei Arkhipov. But then he quit just days into the job, saying he didn't have any interest in being caught up in the middle of a war between feuding artists.

A key player in all of this is producer Vladimir Kiselyov, whose company Kremlin Media is closely allied to Goskontsert, and who is seemingly behind the grand plan for encouraging more patriotic music. Rumour has it that his company is also in talks to buy up other Russian media channels, presumably to likewise provide a platform for his personal patriotic music agenda.

And it seems to be a distrust of Kiselyov and that agenda that has made so many artists so angry about the changes at RMG. Certainly resentment towards Kiselyov elsewhere in the Russian music community is clear. According to Billboard, one local music exec, Iosif Prigozhin, told another radio station, Govorit Moskva, "We absolute refuse to have anything to do with Kiselyov. This is a crazy person who needs to be taken to a mental institution".

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NUJ hits out at Notting Hill Carnival's press accreditation fees
Following all the chitter chatter about the unreasonable demands made by certain artists of photographers given photo passes to their shows, now organisers of the Notting Hill Carnival have been criticised for charging journalists and photographers £100 for press accreditation, and for demanding that any resulting coverage be shared with the organisation.

According to The Guardian, the Carnival's accreditation form stipulates that applicants must "share their blog, video, article, write-up, recap, review or coverage of the events attended within three weeks of the conclusion of the event", and that the Carnival's producer can then use that content on its own websites. Foreign-language journalists must even provide an English translation.

Obviously press can always access the Carnival as a member of the public without accreditation. But paying the £100 fee and committing to the content-sharing terms gets journalists access to an observation tower and press area. Justifying the new terms, the London Notting Hill Carnival Executive Trust says they are "necessary to create the right manageable conditions and make suitable arrangement to enable the promotion of the event".

However, the National Union Of Journalists encouraged its members to boycott the new accreditation scheme, pointing out that freelance journalists not guaranteed any publication of their work may well be out of pocket for trying to cover the event. And such freelancers likely can't commit to give the Carnival rights to republish their work anyway, because any publications that they subsequently sell coverage too would have an opinion on such repurposing of articles.

The NUJ's John Toner told reporters: "It is not acceptable that the media are expected to pay a fee to cover what is a genuine news event. It is equally unacceptable that the organisers expect pictures and video to be supplied free for their commercial purposes. For an individual freelance, this could mean working at a loss. We see no reason why freelances should be expected to subsidise the Carnival. We would urge all members to reject these conditions, and to cover the event from public spaces".

For a time, a number of music festivals starting charging journalists a fee for accreditation, albeit usually in the form of a charitable donation. Though doing so ignores that many music journalists are freelance, operate on incredibly tight budgets, and shell out a load of their own cash anyway to travel to, and eat and drink at, the events they are covering (expenses many music media are unable to cover for their journalists).

And major events risk losing decent coverage if they go this route, because few media have budgets for such fees in this day and age. And commercially speaking, a pre-written top ten list about the event, compiled without actually attending, is likely to get as much traffic, and therefore generate as much ad income, as having a journalist, or team of journalists, provide proper on-the-ground coverage.

  From The Fringe: Off The Mic
Each day this month we are looking at some of the shows, performers and events being championed at the Edinburgh Festival this year by our sister magazine ThreeWeeks.

And today some comedy at last, because yesterday at the Fringe former Xfm DJ Marsha Shandur - who you might remember for her brilliant 'Marsha Meets' comedy podcast back in the day - launched a new book she has co-written with comedian Deborah Frances-White on the art of stand-up. The book was formally unveiled with a panel debate on comedy making at The Pleasance.

"My favourite interviewees were the ones who got very technical" said Shandur to ThreeWeeks. "Gary Delaney was fascinating throughout – talking about the specific effect on one-liner comics of social media, which is both good and bad, and the several stages he goes through to put a set together. He even walked us through his complex and fascinating method of remembering an hour's worth of one-line jokes".

"I also loved how Neal Brennan – who co-created Dave Chappelle's 'Chappelle's Show' – gets really into the psychology of it. When he realised he wasn't smiling enough on stage, he would give his girlfriend $200 before a show; then, every time he smiled on stage, he'd get $20 back from her. At first he kept losing $120 a show, then he learned to get it all back".

Find out more about the book here.
CLICK HERE for the ThreeWeeks website
 

Morrissey chats more about illness and airport fracas
Morrissey has been talking in slightly more detail about recent developments in his life in an interview with Larry King on the veteran talk show host's online programme.

And that included speaking about the cancer treatment that the singer revealed was behind various gig cancellations last autumn. Expanding on that a little, Morrissey told King: "Cancer was found, yes. I had Barrett's, which is the oesophagus. They scrape it occasionally and I have medication. But I'm OK. Lots of people have it and they fade away. Some other people have it and they don't fade away". But, he added, at the moment he felt in good health and that he was "blooming".

Elsewhere in the interview, he spoke about those recent allegations he made regarding staff at San Francisco International Airport, who he last month accused of sexually assaulting him while he went through security. In a post on True To You last month Morrissey wrote "before I could gather my belongings from the usual array of trays [after going through security] I was approached by an 'airport security officer' who stopped me, crouched before me and groped my penis and testicles".

Embellishing a little, he told King of the incident: "Would you like the absolute truth? They are horrific. He put his finger down my rear cleavage. Why would he want to [do that]? Why would he need to? Everything was fine but then he went straight for my private bits and then he put his finger down my rear cleavage".

Of course, we ought to here note that the US Transport Security Administration denied any wrongdoing when Morrissey made his original allegations against its staff last month.

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Lacklustre Coldplay performance inspired Interpol's Carlos D to quit music
Former Interpol member Carlos D has revealed that it was watching a particularly uninspiring Coldplay performance that made him want to quit his band. And music. And anything to do with music making in any, way, shape or form. Which I think we can all relate to.

Dengler (that's what the D stands for, in case you wondered) told Bedford + Bowery that his band shared management with Chris Martin et al, and they offered them tickets to see the band play on US TV show 'Saturday Night Live'. But the band's performance just seemed so lacklustre compared to the comedy that surrounded it.

"I felt so much titillation and excitement over all the skits, and looking at how they were being performed. And then when Coldplay came on, I felt bored, quite frankly. I knew then that there was something going on with me, some kind of identity shift, really. It really troubled me".

Though that was just the nail in the coffin. He goes on: "I was not really mentally all that well while I was in Interpol. I had many substance and process addictions that I was coping with. And I was, you know, the classic VH1 'Behind The Music' story of upward rise and downward fall. The only difference was that - because I didn't have such a good relationship with my bandmates - I wasn't willing to be in the band with them while I experienced my crash".

He adds: "I think as lamentable as some people feel my departure from the band was, it was the best case scenario because I think everyone involved has been better off as a result of my departure".

Dengler has now trained as an actor and hopes to launch a second career in that discipline. And good luck to him I say. At least next time he sees Coldplay boring everyone between some comedy sketches, he can position himself on the sketching side of that fence.

Extra security needed next to provocative Nicki Minaj waxwork after saucy photos go viral
The Las Vegas branch of Madame Tussauds has instigated extra security to stop punters taking "inappropriate" photos of themselves alongside their new waxwork of Nicki Minaj. Though said waxwork does see Minaj provocatively posed on all fours, so they were probably asking for it.

After said "inappropriate" photos, and one in particular, went viral, the museum said in a statement: "We have been made aware of the inappropriate photograph that was taken at Madame Tussauds Las Vegas involving Nicki Minaj's new wax figure. It is unfortunate that this visitor decided to behave so inappropriately and we apologise for any offence this has caused ... We are taking immediate steps to ensure more staff are present in this area and that the set around this particular figure is redesigned so that a picture like this cannot be taken again".

The waxwork is based on Minaj's 'Anaconda' video. On its decision to go for that pose rather than just having the waxed rapper standing at a mic, Madame Tussards told Fader: "We made the decision to celebrate Minaj's unforgettable pose inspired by the 'Anaconda' video because - thanks to her artistry and charisma - it resulted as one of the most iconic videos ever produced".

It went on: "The pose itself recreates an image Minaj published on her own social media channels as a teaser for the video. As with all people we immortalise in our attractions, her representatives were kept informed every step of the way during the figure-creation process and, once it was unveiled, Minaj herself repeatedly expressed her love of the figure on social media, calling the display 'so iconic' and indicating her desire to come see it in person".

So there you go. And it is worth remembering that a Justin Bieber waxwork in New York, which wasn't in any particularly provocative pose, was also groped so much it was taken off display. So the problem here seems to be the real people rather than the wax people. Or maybe it's just that going to a museum that solely consists of wax representations of celebrities is such a dull day out, feeling up the waxworks and taking some naughty selfies is the only thing that makes it bearable.

 
ANDY MALT | Editor
Andy heads up the team, overseeing the CMU bulletin and website, coordinating features and interviews, reporting on artist and business stories, and contributing to the CMU Approved column.
Email andy@unlimitedmedia.co.uk (except press releases, see below)
   
CHRIS COOKE | MD & Business Editor
Chris provides music business coverage and analysis. Chris also leads the CMU Insights training and consultancy business and education programme CMU:DIY, and heads up CMU publisher 3CM UnLimited.
Email chris@unlimitedmedia.co.uk (except press releases, see below)
   
SAM TAYLOR | Commercial Manager & Insights Associate
Sam oversees the commercial side of the CMU media, leading on sales and sponsorship, plus helps manage and deliver the CMU Insights training courses and consultancy services.
Email sam@unlimitedmedia.co.uk or call 020 7099 9060
   
CARO MOSES | Co-Publisher
Caro helps oversee the CMU media, while as a Director of 3CM UnLimited she heads up the company's other two titles ThisWeek London and ThreeWeeks Edinburgh, and supports other parts of the business.
Email caro@unlimitedmedia.co.uk
Send ALL press releases to musicnews@unlimitedmedia.co.uk - this is checked daily by the whole editorial team meaning your release will definitely get to the right person.

For details of the training and consultancy services offered by CMU Insights click here - Andy and Chris are also available to provide music business comment, just email them direct.

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