FRIDAY 28 AUGUST 2015
TODAY'S TOP STORY: So, in what was threatening to be a quiet news week, PRS yesterday informed its members that it was suing SoundCloud. And so, boom, things got all kinds of interesting. Like with YouTube, the music industry has had something of a love/hate relationship with SoundCloud for sometime, though unlike YouTube, until very recently SoundCloud was a no-royalty rather than... [READ MORE]
 
TODAY'S APPROVED: It's that time of year again - oh yes - the huge West London street party takes place this Sunday and bank holiday Monday. And even if we don't quite agree with their press accreditation policies this year, this is still set to be a magnificent event. Sunday is the more relaxed of the days, traditionally being children's day, while it all gets a bit more exuberant on Monday... [READ MORE]
 
BEEF OF THE WEEK: So, if there's one thing we learned this week, it's that having Tyler, The Creator play the Reading or Leeds festival would not be "conducive to the public good", because, just in case there was any doubt whatsoever, the Odd Future rapper simply does not respect our "shared values". All in all, it was a close shave. Thank you Theresa. So yes, Tyler, The Creator revealed... [READ MORE]
   
CMU PODCAST: CMU's Andy Malt and Chris Cooke review the week in music and the music business, including PRS suing Soundcloud, more recent developments in the dispute over the lost MegaUpload data, Tyler, The Creator being refused a visa by the UK government, and One Direction’s upcoming hiatus. The CMU Podcast is sponsored by 7digital. ... [LISTEN HERE]
TOP STORIES PRS sues SoundCloud
PRS's memo to members about its SoundCloud litigation
BASCA backs PRS action against SoundCloud
JUMP | ONLINE
LABELS & PUBLISHERS Sony/ATV launches JV with leading MCN
JUMP | ONLINE
MANAGEMENT & FUNDING First Lynsey de Paul Prize presented
JUMP | ONLINE
DIGITAL & D2F SERVICES Ian Rogers departs Apple
Vine adds musical whatnots in app upgrade
JUMP | ONLINE
MEDIA Xfm relaunch reportedly imminent
JUMP | ONLINE
ONE LINERS Tegan And Sara, Tidal, Alt-J and other stuff
JUMP | ONLINE
AND FINALLY... CMU Beef Of The Week #267: Theresa May v Tyler, The Creator
JUMP | ONLINE
 
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AIR MEDIA - PR MANAGER (LONDON)
Air Media is a creative, forward-thinking music and entertainment PR agency working with a variety of international stars, cutting edge bands, venues and festivals. We are looking for a music-obsessed individual with at least two years’ PR experience to join our small team in West London.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
PARAMOUNT ARTISTS - BOOKING AGENT (BRIGHTON)
Paramount Artists is a booking agency based in central Brighton. We arrange worldwide tours for DJ’s and electronic musicians. We are looking to expand our team and currently have an opening for a booking agent.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
MAMA & COMPANY - ASSISTANT GENERAL MANAGERS, ARTS CLUB, LIVERPOOL; HOXTON SQUARE BAR & KITCHEN AND THE BORDERLINE, LONDON (TEMPORARY CONTRACT)
MAMA & Company are looking for a dynamic, experienced Assistant General Managers with a proven track record within a live music operation to work at Arts Club, Liverpool and at our London venues. This is a fantastic opportunity to work and grow with an exciting company that owns some of London’s most established venues.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
MAMA & COMPANY - ASSISTANT BAR MANAGERS, LONDON VENUES
MAMA & Company is looking for Assistant Bar Managers for its London venues. You will have some experience of maximising bar, cloakroom and other revenues while minimising all relevant costs. You will have exceptional stock and staff management and must be driven to achieve the best results for the venue in support of the Bars Manager. Some experience of duty management within a live music venue would be beneficial.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
MAMA & COMPANY - PROMOTIONAL MANAGER - ARTS CLUB (LIVERPOOL)
MAMA & Company are looking for a dynamic Promotional Manager ideally with some experience within a live music operation to work at Arts Club, Liverpool. This is a fantastic opportunity to work and grow with an exciting company that owns some of the UK’s most established venues.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
OUTPOST - GRADUATE TRAINEE OPPORTUNITY (PUBLISHING & DISTRIBUTION) (LONDON)
Fast growing music company is looking for a sharp graduate to join our team on our three month paid Graduate Trainee Scheme. Working in our publishing and distribution departments, you will also gain first-hand experience in our PR department, working across print, online, radio and TV. Training in general office management will also form part of the role.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
MUSIC CONCIERGE - CLIENT SERVICES MANAGER (HERTFORD)
Music Concierge, the award-winning music consultancy for boutique hotels and luxury brands, is looking for a Client Services Manager to manage our expanding creative and account management teams and oversee the smooth day-to-day operations of the business, whilst liaising at senior level with world-class brands.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
THE ORCHARD - ACCOUNT CO-ORDINATOR, VIDEO SERVICES (LONDON)
As an Account Co-ordinator in the Video Services department, you are vital in helping to scale our fast growing Video Services business in Europe; executing on a value proposition that drives client satisfaction, engagement and revenue. You are a positive, smart, creative and analytical forward-thinker, and an Orchard evangelist in and outside of the company.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
AIR ARTIST AGENCY - PERSONAL ASSISTANT (LONDON)
Air Artist Agency is an innovative live music agency. The agency represents the cream of today's jazz musicians, cutting edge innovators and mainstream established artists. With an extensive worldwide network of contacts, we book for emerging talents as well as established artists. We are looking for a personal assistant to one of our directors.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
AUDIO NETWORK - PRODUCT AND A&R MANAGER (LONDON)
Working in our London office, we are looking for a music industry professional with passion and experience to join the Audio Network Music Team, primarily as cross discipline (B2B and B2C) Product Manager but also in support of all A&R functions.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
 
CMU Jobs is a proven way to recruit the best music business talent for roles across the industry at all levels, from graduate to senior management. To book an ad contact Sam on 020 7099 9060 or email ads@unlimitedmedia.co.uk
 

PRS sues SoundCloud
So, in what was threatening to be a quiet news week, PRS yesterday informed its members that it was suing SoundCloud. And so, boom, things got all kinds of interesting.

Like with YouTube, the music industry has had something of a love/hate relationship with SoundCloud for sometime, though unlike YouTube, until very recently SoundCloud was a no-royalty rather than low-royalty service.

And while most artists and labels like the SoundCloud interface, and want to reach the massive audience of music fans SoundCloud has amassed, as the years went by resentment grew that there was no way to monetise content on this platform, whether it was uploaded by creator or fan. And for years the digital start-up didn't seem to have any ambitions in the content monetisation space; it was simply a digital distribution service for creators, which made its money charging content producers subscription fees.

But in more recent years, and especially the last eighteen months, SoundCloud has shifted its business plan somewhat and started to engage with rights owners about how they might monetise content on its platform, through both ads and subscriptions. This shift might have been in response to several years of pressure from the labels, though it seemed to be more a result of investors demanding that the company find new ways of making revenue beyond charging content producers fees for hosting and streaming their audio files.

Some labels, pissed off that their various attempts to discuss licensing deals had been ignored for several years, were initially resistant of SoundCloud's new approach, especially as it became clear it was interested in a licensing model more akin to YouTube than Spotify.

But at the same time, those labels knew SoundCloud was a great marketing platform, a popular service with artists and fans, and had access to a massive community of music consumers. And if there was now an opportunity to monetise all of that, well, you'd be mad to turn that down. And so a deal with Warner Music was announced, and then with indie-label repping Merlin. Plus an agreement with Universal is seemingly imminent, though Sony Music is still holding out for a better offer.

But what about the bloody publishers? Well, SoundCloud has been speaking to those who control the song copyrights as well as recording copyright owners, and it reached a deal with the National Music Publishers' Association in the US back in May, seemingly providing a template to cover the mechanical rights of the group's indie members. But back in the UK it seems negotiations have not been going so well.

In its memo to members yesterday, PRS wrote: "After careful consideration, and following five years of unsuccessful negotiations, we now find ourselves in a situation where we have no alternative but to commence legal proceedings against the online music service SoundCloud. Launched in 2008, the service now has more than 175 million unique listeners per month. Unfortunately, the organisation continues to deny it needs a PRS For Music licence for its existing service available in the UK and Europe, meaning it is not remunerating our members when their music is streamed by the SoundCloud platform".

It is important to note that the PRS memo doesn't actually talk about the new SoundCloud business model – or sharing in ad revenue and licensing the new subscription service – but instead expresses frustration about the current SoundCloud business, and the fact the digital firm "continues to deny it needs a PRS For Music licence" at all. Which means that really this is a safe harbours case that – if it got to court – would test some important elements of copyright law, which SoundCloud would probably rather not be tested.

The safe harbours contained in US and European copyright law have come under increased scrutiny this year, and for a full primer on all that check out this CMU trends article, which we just made free-to-access for all. The safe harbours assure that internet service providers and server hosting companies are not liable for copyright infringement if and when their customers distribute or store copyright material without permission; they get the protection providing they have a system in place for removing infringing content from their networks when made aware of it by a rights owner.

But plenty of services beyond ISPs and server hosting firms utilise these safe harbours, with MegaUpload, Grooveshark, YouTube and SoundCloud amongst those claiming safe harbour protection. Which is how SoundCloud can say it didn't need a licence from any label, publisher or collecting society up until this point. It never uploaded any of the content that appears on its platform, and it was always happy to remove any recordings containing PRS-controlled songs, if only PRS had asked.

As it does proper deals with the labels - safe harbours or no safe harbours - SoundCloud needs to woo the publishers, because no label wants to pump all its content into a streaming service and then see it all taken down at the request of whoever controls the publishing rights. And, of course, most labels are also publishers, so will usually insist digital service providers also license any songs they stream (even if the labels have, by this point, taken more than half the available money, meaning the songwriters and publishers will always see much less cash).

Now, SoundCloud has no problem wooing publishers for its new ad and subscription funded services – as it did in the US – but it seems that, with PRS at least, it is facing problems putting aside the issue of the service it is offering as of now, and has been for the past few years. "Where's our royalties for all the songs you're exploiting right now" the songwriters and publishers are saying, "and for the songs you exploited yesterday and three years ago?"

For it's part, SoundCloud calls the newly announced legal action "regrettable", insisting that talks are ongoing with PRS about its service moving forward, and that going legal in this way is counter-productive for everyone. Though for PRS there is a point of principle and precedent here, the society does not want to change its position that SoundCloud has required a songs licence from day one and has been infringing copyright ever since.

"It has been a difficult decision to begin legal action against SoundCloud but [it is] one we firmly believe is in the best, long-term interests of our membership" PRS said in its letter yesterday. "This is because it is important we establish the principle that a licence is required when services make available music to users".

It will be fascinating to see what happens next. PRS says it provided SoundCloud with a list of 4500 songs it controls currently streaming on the platform, of which the digital firm has so far removed just 250. It could now takedown the rest, and any other PRS-controlled songs that it is made aware of.

Though – in the same way GEMA's stand-off with YouTube in Germany has greatly restricted that platform's position as a music service in the country – if SoundCloud were to start removing all PRS-repped songs it would have a massive impact on its ability to operate in the UK, just as it's trying to get its all-new business model off the ground.

So it seems unlikely it will go that route, unless it feels doing so would annoy enough singer songwriters who use SoundCloud that they'd put pressure on their collecting society to backtrack. Though at the moment there seems to be enough support for PRS's litigation in the songwriting and publishing community that that would be a dangerous tactic.

Presumably the digital firm hopes that it can still do a licensing deal with PRS for the future, and in doing so write off the past. PRS would also presumably prefer to not have to see this through to court. Though if it did, it would put safe harbours properly under the judicial spotlight, just as the music industry is busy trying to have those laws rewritten anyway.

So, as I say, things got all kinds of interesting.

--------------------------------------------------

PRS's memo to members about its SoundCloud litigation
After careful consideration, and following five years of unsuccessful negotiations, we now find ourselves in a situation where we have no alternative but to commence legal proceedings against the online music service SoundCloud.

When a writer or publisher becomes a member of the Performing Right Society, they assign certain rights to their works over for us to administer, so it's our job to ensure we collect and distribute royalties due to them. SoundCloud actively promotes and shares music. Launched in 2008, the service now has more than 175m unique listeners per month. Unfortunately, the organisation continues to deny it needs a PRS For Music licence for its existing service available in the UK and Europe, meaning it is not remunerating our members when their music is streamed by the SoundCloud platform.

Our aim is always to license services when they use our members' music. It has been a difficult decision to begin legal action against SoundCloud but one we firmly believe is in the best, long-term interests of our membership. This is because it is important we establish the principle that a licence is required when services make available music to users. We have asked SoundCloud numerous times to recognise their responsibilities to take a licence to stop the infringement of our members' copyrights but so far our requests have not been met. Therefore we now have no choice but to pursue the issue through the courts.

We understand SoundCloud has taken down some of our members' works from their service. With our letter of claim, we sent SoundCloud a list of 4500 musical works which are being made available on the service, as a sample of our repertoire being used, so that they understood the scale of our members' repertoire and its use on the service. We asked them to take a licence to cover the use of all our members' repertoire or otherwise stop infringing.

SoundCloud decided to respond to our claim by informing us that it had removed 250 posts. Unfortunately, we have no visibility or clarity on SoundCloud's approach to removing works, so it is not currently clear why these particular posts have been selected by them given the wider issue of infringement that is occurring. Ultimately, it is SoundCloud's decision as to whether it starts paying for the ongoing use of our members' music or stops using these works entirely.

If the streaming market is to reach its true potential and offer a fair return for our members, organisations such as SoundCloud must pay for their use of our members' music. We launched our Streamfair campaign in June to raise awareness of this issue and highlight how music creators need to be properly remunerated from streaming. We believe that all digital services should obtain a licence which grants them permission to use our members' music and repertoire, in this case the works of songwriters, publishers and composers.

The streaming market cannot fairly develop unless this happens. We have always been pro-licensing and pro-actively work with organisations in order to propose an appropriate licensing solution for the use of our members' works.

We remain hopeful that this matter can be resolved without the need for extended litigation. Members will appreciate that this is now a legal matter and our ability to communicate around it is therefore limited by the legal process. However, we will try to share information and updates whenever we can.

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BASCA backs PRS action against SoundCloud
The British Academy Of Songwriters, Composers And Authors yesterday gave its backing to PRS's litigation against SoundCloud, insisting that the digital firm's current business model "financially damages our members".

The organisation's CEO Vick Bain said: "As an organisation that works to protect our members' rights we fully support PRS For Music's decision to commence legal proceedings against SoundCloud. We acknowledge that streaming is a fantastic means of listening to and enjoying music but SoundCloud's intransigence in refusing to be licensed through PRS For Music means their model financially damages our members".

Referencing BASCA's campaign for an overhaul of the way digital income is shared between stakeholders, she continued: "BASCA exists to protect the professional interests of its members and when we launched our The Day The Music Died Campaign earlier this year one of our key aims was to ensure the removal of safe harbour provisions – platforms such as SoundCloud hide behind this legislation to deny responsibility for the amount of music that is illegally uploaded and shared on its site". 

"But we know they are very much aware of how their platform is used. We encourage all online services to establish frameworks that will fairly compensate songwriters, composers and authors – the PRS For Music online licence is the best way that this can be achieved. SoundCloud has had five years to respond to PRS's request and should not be allowed to continue to hide behind safe harbour as a reason to deny our members the royalties they're rightly entitled to". 

Those sentiments were echoed by BASCA's new Chairman Stephen McNeff, who said: "At BASCA we are always happy to embrace innovative technology as a way for music creators to be heard, but our rights must be protected through the proper licensing mechanisms".

Sony/ATV launches JV with leading MCN
The German wing of music publishing major Sony/ATV has announced a global JV with one of those multi-channel networks, Divimove, a big player in the MCN space in Europe in which TV production giant Fremantle has a controlling stake.

The move into music publishing follows Divimove launching a talent management wing earlier this year. The JV with Sony/ATV will be called Divimove Music Publishing, and it will look to evolve the careers and output of songwriters it works with on YouTube and elsewhere.

First Lynsey de Paul Prize presented
The PRS For Music Foundation has announced the winner of the first Lynsey de Paul Prize, a new grant it launched in partnership with the PRS For Music Members Benevolent Fund earlier this year in memory of late singer-songwriter de Paul, who died last October.

The aim of the prize is to enable young female singer-songwriters to work on new material and develop their careers with the support of a mentor. And the first recipient of the grant is Emma McGrath, a 15 year-old acoustic singer-songwriter from Hertfordshire.

PRS For Music Foundation chief Vanessa Reed told reporters: "Congratulations to Emma McGrath for winning the first Lynsey de Paul Prize. We received over 100 applications, of which the standard was very high, showing there is an exciting wealth of talented emerging female singer-songwriters in the UK. We're proud that through the Lynsey de Paul Prize we are able to encourage and support more talented female singer-songwriters to take the next steps in their career".

Ian Rogers departs Apple
Ian Rogers is departing Apple just two months after the new streaming service he helped develop launched, seemingly to join a non-music-based company in Europe.

Rogers enjoyed a high profile in the music industry while running direct-to-fan service TopSpin, and was then head-hunted by Beats to develop and launch its big streaming service. When Beats was bought by Apple, Rogers also joined the tech giant, though he had a much lower profile role in the subsequent evolution and launch of Apple Music. That said, he seemed to mainly work on the launch of Apple's online radio station Beats 1, which did enjoy most of the hype once the firm's new music platform finally went live.

Rogers' departure, confirmed to the FT, has seemingly come out of the blue for both colleagues and the tech giant's music industry partners, who generally saw the former TopSpin chief as an ally within the Apple empire.

Elsewhere in Apple news, the company has put another big press announcement in the diary for 9 Sep, likely to launch the iPhone 6S and an upgraded Apple TV.

--------------------------------------------------

Vine adds musical whatnots in app upgrade
Twitter's mini-video-message app Vine is having an upgrade and it is getting all kinds of musical. Well, I say that. They're adding a 'featured tracks' section where users can pick soundtracks for their videos. And they're adding a thing called Snap To Beat, which will help users trim the track so it loops nicely. And they will help other users identify what music appears in Vine videos. Which, I think sounds like Vine is getting all kinds of musical. I don't know why there was all that doubt in my second sentence.

There has been some chatter of late in music circles, as video and messaging apps have started to encourage users to include music in their messages, as to how exactly such usage is being licensed. Though it seems that Vine will select music to appear in its 'featured tracks' tab and then licence it from the relevant labels and publishers.

That said, there is talk of the promotional value to artists of being featured in the Vine tracks tab, which is usually tech firm speak for: "give us your music for free, promo, promo, promo, promo, sell more t-shirts". Which, by coincidence, is something I'm planning on having printed on a t-shirt.

Xfm relaunch reportedly imminent
More gossiping this week about the planned relaunch of Xfm, with Popbitch reckoning an official announcement is due within the next ten days.

Though, while initially saying that - as previously mooted - the revamped station would become Capital Rocks, better intelligence this morning suggests owner Global has actually opted for Radio X. That, presumably, is a result of Global's plan to make X properly national, but via mainly online and digital rather than FM channels.

Though, while the new look Xfm will be keeping its X, other rumours that the revamp will shift the station more into Absolute rock radio territory seem to stand, with Chris Moyles, Vernon Kay, Johnny Vaughan and Ricky Wilson all tipped for shows. As for incumbents, Popbitch reckons Dan O'Connell, Phil Clifton and John Kennedy will remain.

  Vigsy's Notting Hill Carnival Tip
It's that time of year again - oh yes - the huge West London street party takes place this Sunday and bank holiday Monday. And even if we don't quite agree with their press accreditation policies this year, this is still set to be a magnificent event. Sunday is the more relaxed of the days, traditionally being children's day, while it all gets a bit more exuberant on Monday.

There is, of course, the traditional calypso, soca and reggae from the Caribbean, the always excellent steel pan bands, and lots of hugely detailed costumery. Plus the taste of the Caribbean is ever present: the smell of jerk chicken and curried goat (very very nice), or saltfish and ackee with rice and peas, is all around.

The Carnival also forays into jungle, ragga, hip hop, house and broken beat via the numerous soundsystems dotted around Notting Hill over the weekend. They're certainly worth hunting down – and while a bit of planning is always advised – don't be too rigid with that plan, ultimately it's better to just go with the flow.

Of the 38 officially listed soundsystems, the five I'd really try to check out are...

1. CMC/Matrix and 4Play playing drum n bass and garage.
2. King Tubbys for excellent reggae.
3. Aba Shanti4 also on a reggae tip.
4. Rough But Sweet featuring the Rinse FM DJs.
5. Rapattack taking us from funk to house to soul.

Make sure you have a map with you, Time Out has one here, and remember it gets very crowded indeed, so keep an eye on friends and maybe have a plan for regrouping, because phone networks often fall down during the Carnival festivities. Oh, and take enough money because the cash points are often drained by Monday. And, given the forecast, maybe take your waterproofs too.

Meanwhile, let's not forget the pre and post Carnival parties. Later today the Trouble Vision Carnival Warm Up is at Corsica Studios with Osunlade and Jay Daniel, while tomorrow you'll find Don Letts and Fabio at Big Chill House N1 for Jamaica Rum Tings, and the We Love Soul (Carnival Special) night at the Scala in Kings Cross has Steve Sutherland and Norris Windross.

Sunday sees Peckhams' CLF Arts Cafe host the Deadly Rhythms after party with Karizma and Alex Nut, while Dingwalls in Kensal Rise sees Mungos Hi Fi takeover for some sonic antics. And on Monday, Benji B's Deviation sets up camp at The Paradise, and West Side Story sees Terry Farley and Barry Ashworth hit the decks at the Masons Arms. Oh, and Jamie Rodigan hosts a Carnival After Party at Notting Hill Arts Club too.

All in all, a great line up for an often underrated London tradition. Let's hope the sun does shine this weekend on West London. And if you're one of those Londoners who has never quite made it to this event, then do it, trust me, you'll love it. Big Up Carnival!

CLICK HERE for the ThreeWeeks website
 

Tegan And Sara, Tidal, Alt-J and other stuff

Other notable announcements and developments today...

• Booking agency WME has nabbed Tegan And Sara for worldwide representation, according to Billboard, they previously having been booked by The Agency Group in the US.

• Indie publisher Imagem Music yesterday announced that Chimene Mohammed had joined its UK unit as Junior A&R, joining from Atlantic Records where she worked in marketing.

• In Billboard's latest survey of US industry types, 71% of respondents said they thought Tidal would be gone within a year, with another 17% giving the Jay-Z led streaming service up to two years. Oh well, if it does quietly get parked in the next two years, it will always live on in the "how not to relaunch your company" section of any PR textbook ever published in the future.

• Hey everybody, one-time Westlifer Brian McFadden is joining Heat Radio for a new weekly show! And while you might not care, the cover star of the final issue of our sister Edinburgh Fringe magazine ThreeWeeks will be excited.

• Ahead of their Reading/Leeds sets this weekend, Alt-J have announced details of an arena tour for later in the year, kicking of in Manchester on 29 Nov. And while you might not care, neither does the cover star of the final issue of our sister Edinburgh Fringe magazine ThreeWeeks.

CMU Beef Of The Week #267: Theresa May v Tyler, The Creator
So, if there's one thing we learned this week, it's that having Tyler, The Creator play the Reading or Leeds festival would not be "conducive to the public good", because, just in case there was any doubt whatsoever, the Odd Future rapper simply does not respect our "shared values". All in all, it was a close shave. Thank you Theresa.

So yes, Tyler, The Creator revealed earlier this week that he was cancelling his planned appearances at Reading and Leeds, and gigs in Belfast and Dublin, because UK Home Secretary Theresa May didn't want him to get on a British stage. May, of course, has no power over the Irish gig, though presumably it wasn't commercially viable for him to fly in for just the one show.

Tyler himself took to Twitter to declare "BASED ON LYRICS FROM 2009 I AM NOT ALLOWED IN THE UK FOR 3-5 YEARS (although I was there 8 weeks ago) THAT IS WHY THE SHOWS WERE CANCELLED". While his manager, Christian Clancy, revealed in a Tumblr post that: "Tyler has been banned from entering the UK for somewhere between three to five years per a letter from the Secretary Of State for the home department of the United Kingdom. The letter specifically cites lyrics he wrote six to seven years ago for his albums 'Bastard' and 'Goblin'".

A spokesman for said home department – or the bloody Home Office, as well call it – said they couldn't comment on any one visa application, but that: "Coming to the UK is a privilege, and we expect those who come here to respect our shared values. The Home Secretary has the power to exclude an individual if she considers that his or her presence in the UK is not conducive to the public good or if their exclusion is justified on public policy grounds".

Now, it's not the first time a musician has been refused entry into the UK for a gig, though usually such visa issues relate to criminal charges back home, where as this seems to be all about certain offensive lyrics the Odd Future man once wrote and rapped. And while Tyler, The Creator has written, and said, and rapped some silly – and at times offensive - stuff over the years, it does seem a bit extreme to ban him from the entire country as a result.

And that's before you consider the fact that the lyrics that seem to have led to this ban are over five years old. As Clancy said, that means the Home Office has ignored Tyler's entire output, and change in tone, in the intervening time. Plus it raises the question why the rapper has been let into the UK so many times since releasing 'Bastard' and 'Goblin' if the lyrics on the records were really so harmful.

But ignoring all of that, there is, of course, a free speech dimension to all of this. Perhaps Tyler, The Creator did rap and say some silly and offensive and inappropriate things five years ago. Perhaps he rapped and said some silly and offensive and inappropriate things much more recently than that. But is the solution to deny the rapper entry into the country? And if so, do you not have to also ban any other artists who have said or sung similarly contentious things?

Of course any artist who is deliberately or inadvertently controversial should be challenged, by journalists, campaigners, opponents and, preferably, allies and fans. Protests can be staged, both online and in the real world whenever the offending artist performs.

But to protest in a way that stops a performance, or which results in an actual ban from a venue or a festival or even a whole country, well, is there not a danger that you just end up opposing illiberal ideas with illiberal actions? And do you really change opinions and attitudes by just shutting up those who offend you? Do you not risk giving those who share the opinions and attitudes of the offending artist – or the character the artist has chosen to play – a firmer resolve to hold their bad beliefs?

So, like Clancy himself said, "I'm not defending [Tyler's] OLD lyrics", but I don't see how a blunt ban, let alone a belated blunt ban, achieves anything for anyone. Whatever Theresa may think.

Though, all that said, British radio should still have banned 'Blurred Lines'. And if you want to know why, well, you'll have to wait until I restage my Edinburgh Fringe show in London, and then I'll tell you.

 
ANDY MALT | Editor
Andy heads up the team, overseeing the CMU bulletin and website, coordinating features and interviews, reporting on artist and business stories, and contributing to the CMU Approved column.
Email andy@unlimitedmedia.co.uk (except press releases, see below)
   
CHRIS COOKE | MD & Business Editor
Chris provides music business coverage and analysis. Chris also leads the CMU Insights training and consultancy business and education programme CMU:DIY, and heads up CMU publisher 3CM UnLimited.
Email chris@unlimitedmedia.co.uk (except press releases, see below)
   
SAM TAYLOR | Commercial Manager & Insights Associate
Sam oversees the commercial side of the CMU media, leading on sales and sponsorship, plus helps manage and deliver the CMU Insights training courses and consultancy services.
Email sam@unlimitedmedia.co.uk or call 020 7099 9060
   
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Caro helps oversee the CMU media, while as a Director of 3CM UnLimited she heads up the company's other two titles ThisWeek London and ThreeWeeks Edinburgh, and supports other parts of the business.
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