TUESDAY 8 SEPTEMBER 2015
TODAY'S TOP STORY: If you're bored of Justin Bieber's record breaking first-week streams and Sam Smith's record breaking 67 weeks in the top ten, here's a different broken record. Google processed 16.68 million takedown notices in just one week last month, according to Torrentfreak, the highest number ever in seven days. In a single week in August 2011 just 158,000 takedown requests... [READ MORE]
 
TODAY'S APPROVED: A decade ago The Duke Spirit were being lauded as the next big thing in British rock music, on the back of their excellent debut album 'Cuts Across The Land'. In the intervening years, over the course of three years, you might say, they fizzled out somewhat. I bet you thought they'd split up. But no, they have not, and now they are back. Working once again with... [READ MORE]
 
CMU PODCAST: CMU's Andy Malt and Chris Cooke review the week in music and the music business, including Tesco and Technics joining the much hyped vinyl revival, EMI Production Music's sample amnesty, the Canadian company accusing the majors of anti-competitive behaviour over public domain recordings, and Kanye West's bid to be President of the USA. The CMU Podcast is sponsored by 7digital... [LISTEN HERE]
TOP STORIES Google was processing 23 copyright takedowns a second last month
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LABELS & PUBLISHERS PRS For Music to review over 40 public performance tariffs
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DIGITAL & D2F SERVICES BBC planning its own music streaming service
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MEDIA Global gets Radio X out for the lads
Metal Hammer to release mobile videogame
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ARTIST NEWS Sam Smith records new Bond theme
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RELEASES Avicii has a few stories to tell. Fourteen, in fact. So you'd best get a cushion
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GIGS & FESTIVALS Slaves announce off-Dismaland show
Doc N Roll film festival to return for second year
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ONE LINERS Google Play, Amon Tobin, James Arthur, more
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AND FINALLY... Niall Horan foot fracture a mystery but probably not caused by a squirrel
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Click JUMP to skip direct to a section of this email or ONLINE to read and share stories on the CMU website (JUMP option may not work in all email readers). For regular updates from Team CMU follow us on Twitter, Facebook or Tumblr.
 
 
DOMINO - INTERNATIONAL MARKETING MANAGER (LONDON)
Domino Recording Co is seeking an International Marketing Manager to join the International Department based in the London office. A very exciting opportunity for a dynamic marketing manager to join the Domino International team. The ideal candidate will have at least two years’ experience in music marketing, be familiar with Domino's output, aware of its history and will complement the company culture.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here
   
IMPRESSIVE PR - SENIOR MUSIC PUBLICIST (LONDON)
We need an experienced Senior Music Publicist who knows the job, has excellent music media contacts and potential to bring in their own clients. The role is all about personality - organised, friendly, positive, "can do" attitude, great journalist contacts and being able to juggle artists promo schedules, multiple releases and generate high volumes of coverage.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here
   
MERLIN - HEAD OF ROYALTIES (LONDON)
Merlin, the global rights licensing agency for the independent sector, is seeking an experienced professional to head its royalties division. Based in the company’s central London office, the successful candidate will demonstrate a deep knowledge and understanding of both practical and technical aspects of processing digital royalties, along with proven experience in a senior role within this sphere.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here
   
DOMINO - WAREHOUSE MANAGER (LONDON)
We are looking for a bright, energetic warehouse manager with plenty of enthusiasm to supervise our warehouse operation. The role could suit someone with existing warehouse experience, but also someone with a music retail background.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here
   
AIR MEDIA - PR MANAGER (LONDON)
Air Media is a creative, forward-thinking music and entertainment PR agency working with a variety of international stars, cutting edge bands, venues and festivals. We are looking for a music-obsessed individual with at least two years’ PR experience to join our small team in West London.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
PARAMOUNT ARTISTS - BOOKING AGENT (BRIGHTON)
Paramount Artists is a booking agency based in central Brighton. We arrange worldwide tours for DJ’s and electronic musicians. We are looking to expand our team and currently have an opening for a booking agent.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
MAMA & COMPANY - ASSISTANT GENERAL MANAGERS, ARTS CLUB, LIVERPOOL; HOXTON SQUARE BAR & KITCHEN AND THE BORDERLINE, LONDON (TEMPORARY CONTRACT)
MAMA & Company are looking for a dynamic, experienced Assistant General Managers with a proven track record within a live music operation to work at Arts Club, Liverpool and at our London venues. This is a fantastic opportunity to work and grow with an exciting company that owns some of London’s most established venues.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
MAMA & COMPANY - ASSISTANT BAR MANAGERS, LONDON VENUES
MAMA & Company is looking for Assistant Bar Managers for its London venues. You will have some experience of maximising bar, cloakroom and other revenues while minimising all relevant costs. You will have exceptional stock and staff management and must be driven to achieve the best results for the venue in support of the Bars Manager. Some experience of duty management within a live music venue would be beneficial.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
MAMA & COMPANY - PROMOTIONAL MANAGER - ARTS CLUB (LIVERPOOL)
MAMA & Company are looking for a dynamic Promotional Manager ideally with some experience within a live music operation to work at Arts Club, Liverpool. This is a fantastic opportunity to work and grow with an exciting company that owns some of the UK’s most established venues.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
 
CMU Jobs is a proven way to recruit the best music business talent for roles across the industry at all levels, from graduate to senior management. To book an ad contact Sam on 020 7099 9060 or email ads@unlimitedmedia.co.uk
 

Google was processing 23 copyright takedowns a second last month
If you're bored of Justin Bieber's record breaking first-week streams and Sam Smith's record breaking 67 weeks in the top ten, here's a different broken record. Google processed 16.68 million takedown notices in just one week last month, according to Torrentfreak, the highest number ever in seven days. In a single week in August 2011 just 158,000 takedown requests were processed by the web giant. Such growth! If only someone could work out a way to monetise it.

The takedown notices to which we refer are those issued under the US Digital Millennium Copyright Act against the Google search engine, requesting that links to copyright infringing material be removed from its database so that they no longer appear when users search for certain key words. Most copyright industries have become adept at issuing takedown notices against web firms that are utilising the so call safe harbours of US or European law, though the music industry is generally the most prolific in this domain.

The number of takedown notices being submitted to the likes of Google has increased dramatically in recent years simply as copyright owners - and the music industry especially - put a bigger focus on this kind of anti-piracy activity, and developed tools and teams to help with the process. And as we discussed at CMU Insights @ The Great Escape 2014, takedown issuing is now a routine part of the music rights day for some labels and publishers.

Though, Torrentfreak notes that the recent surge in the number of takedowns being issued is partly the by-product of some other anti-piracy tactics employed by the content industries. As previously reported, right owners have increasingly been going after the domain names of piracy set-ups, either through the courts or just directly with domain registrars.

As a result most piracy sites now concurrently operate from multiple domains logged at different registries, the hope being that if one is seized another will be unaffected. Because Google insists that a rights owner provide precise URLs that it wish to be removed from its search engine, rather than just the name of a piece of content that may be linked to in a number of ways, rights owners now frequently have to list multiple URLs to stop people accessing just one file, thus increasing the number of takedowns for the web giant to process.

Rights owners have long argued that where a website exists primarily to enable or encourage infringement - and especially where a court of law has ruled as such and issued a web-blocking order to local internet service providers - then Google should delete every single link originating from that service as a matter of course. So all and any URLs that contain words 'Pirate Bay' or 'Kickass Torrents' or any variation thereof would be removed.

Google has always countered the call for such measures with the customary "we're not the policemen of the internet" line. The music and movie industries still hope to force Google's hand on this issue one day, but in the meantime they will let the takedowns continue to flood in, and if the web giant ever complains about having to process 23 copyright complaints a second (by Torrentfreak's maths), they'll argue that the scale of the operation is the web giant's own doing.

So see you back here in a year's time for the next 'record number of takedowns issued against Google' story. When Sam Smith's bloody record will still probably be in the top ten.

PRS For Music to review over 40 public performance tariffs
The UK publishing sector's collecting society PRS For Music is simplifying, streamlining and consolidating over 40 of its "tariffs", in order to make it easier to acquire public performance licences for songs. So that's nice. But not before a public consultation, mind. Because we all love a public consultation.

Rob Kirkham, overseeing all of this, says: "The purpose of the simplification programme is to create tariffs that are easy to understand and use. By reviewing public performance tariffs across a number of sectors, our aim is that customers can continue to utilise and enjoy PRS For Music's repertoire in a simpler and more efficient way. The consultations will provide opportunities to engage with our customers offering them open lines of communication with us, as PRS seeks to ensure that we continue to operate modern and appropriate licensing schemes".

The initial consultations will cover tariffs J, GP, O and the absolute classic, DS, which relates to various fitness and dance uses, and my favourite, the plucky underdog UC, which relates to universities and higher education. Get involved here.

As previously reported, PRS For Music is also conducting a consultation on Tariff LP, which covers royalties paid by concert and festival promoters. That review was launched in April, despite a 2011 decision to keep everything just the way it was.

BBC planning its own music streaming service
The BBC has outlined plans to launch its own music streaming platform, of sorts, building on the existing Playlister service and aimed at music discovery.

In its newly published 'British, Bold, Creative' report, considering what the Beeb might do under its next Royal Charter from Parliament, despite its funds being further cut, the Corporation notes its importance to the UK music industry, pointing out that it is "the single biggest licensee of music in the UK and the largest employer of professional musicians", and bigging up initiatives like BBC Introducing and their role in uncovering new talent.

However, as music consumption trends shift with new technology, the BBC's role as a big player in music is not a given. So, says the report, the Corporation "must adapt if we are to remain relevant to audiences, and remain a cornerstone of the wider music industry [and] evolve our music offering so that it serves new audience needs and habits and allows us to remain a strong partner and contributor to the UK creative sector".

It goes on: "To that end, we have developed a digital music proposal with the music industry, which builds on BBC Music's Playlister. It would make the 50,000 tracks the BBC broadcasts every month available to listen online, for a limited period. Audiences would be able to access this music via playlists curated by the BBC, and they would be able to build their own playlists based on the music they hear and love on the BBC".

"Through this digital music offer, we would reinvent our role as a trusted guide, in partnership with our audience and with the UK music industry", it adds. "Together, the BBC and its audiences would curate music in new ways, enabling the discovery of more of all the music we play across the schedules of our many radio stations and TV channels".

Of course, under its charter the BBC's ambitions are always curtailed, in that it has to be careful about competing with commercial content providers, especially outside of conventional broadcast channels. There was talk of a BBC streaming service once before when the Playlister project was first being developed, and some chatter was given to what role the Corporation should actually play in this space. Playlister as it is very much directs people to other streaming services, and arguably uses BBC radio brands to introduce consumers to music services that compete with radio.

Still wary of being seen to have ambitions beyond its remit, the new report particularly talks up how this new streaming service would champion unsigned and less mainstream talent "who are less supported by the wider broadcast and digital market but for whom there are enthusiastic audiences". Content exclusive to the BBC would also feature prominently, such as Radio 1's Live Lounge and performances from the radio station's Big Weekend events, as well as recordings from the BBC's archive of classical performances.

And, Spotifys and Deezers of the world should note, like Playlister to date, the service would also be "fully open and integrated with other digital providers", with users "able to transfer playlists between digital music products, and access them after BBC availability has expired through third-party providers".

A name and exact timeline for this proposed new service is not given. It remains to be seen if conventional streaming music services busy trying to build their audience see the BBC's new ambitions in this space as a massive help or a massive pain in the arse.

Global gets Radio X out for the lads
So, as Global Radio confirmed yesterday morning that Xfm would morph or, rather, regenerate into the much mooted Radio X on 21 Sep, there was plenty chatter online about the concept of a radio station packaged for MEN, the line-up of quotes pumped out from the new station's line-up of celebrity presenters, and the passing of a commercial radio station that set out to champion what was new and alternative in music.

Because while, as previously noted, some of the specialist shows will remain in night time - most notably John Kennedy's always brilliant 'Xposure' - so there'll still presumably be a few hours a day dedicated to the original Xfm mission, the sense is that daytime on Radio X will have a much safer music policy than even Xfm at its safest. And while the new venture's strapline is "get into the music", with Chris Moyles and Johnny Vaughan in the two flagship slots, we assume it will be chat between the records that really positions this station.

Given all the flack commercial radio gets for putting too little effort and budget into opinionated and distinct on-air personalities, opting too often for the "more music power every hour" approach that became a 'thing' in the 1990s, if Global was repositioning one of its pop FM stations into the Radio X format it would probably get plenty of praise.

But in the music community there seems to be more disappointment. Partly at the suggestion that a music radio station could or should be skewed towards just one gender (though rumour has it that the 'for MEN' thing was much more pronounced in the first draft of the Radio X launch). And partly at the demise of a nearly two decade mission to have a commercial station on the FM dial that exists primarily to champion new and alternative music; a mission that was sometimes partly successful, and at other times really worked.

Ever since the mega-radio business that is Global Radio was created, it never seemed like Xfm got all that much love from the top guard there, but perversely the firm's indifference to the brand meant the hugely stripped-back team running the station had more of a free reign to make some great radio. And to be fair, when Global found itself with a spare FM licence in Scotland last year, it did use it to extend the Xfm network.

But perhaps - even without the conspiracy theories of Global supremo Ashley Tabor reinventing a whole radio station to give his old mate Chris Moyles a new job - it was inevitable that the old Xfm would eventually have to go, especially once BBC 6 Music started to gain momentum after its threatened closure, it sort of being the radio station Xfm's creators actually envisaged (mainly presented by the people Xfm's creators envisaged presenting it).

Also, as radio expert Matt Deegan wrote yesterday, the core Xfm audience were hard to please and monetise, the station's various owners having never been quite able to persuade brands that the undeniable cool that came with Xfm (certainly at its peak) should equate to premium ad and sponsorship rates, despite the relatively modest listening figures. Deegan writes: "New music fans are miserable bastards at the best of times - it's almost impossible to satisfy them, there aren't that many of them, and you're now sharing their listening with blogs and Spotify and so on".

So goodbye Xfm, it was fun while it lasted. We hope that the dream can live on a little through 'Xposure' and any other late night treats. And in daytime, those seeking new music can switch to 6 or Amazing or some new fangled playlist-orientated algorithm-human-curated personalised-streaming mish mash. While Global Radio gets on with working out whether there's good money to be made out of bland rock and raucous banter.

And now here are the quotes. Enjoy.

Vernon Kay: "I'm excited to be getting back on the radio. The launch of Radio X is the dawn of a new era in radio. There is a real buzz around the station because we know that this is going to be a lot of fun... It's going to be a real honour to have Chris Moyles as my warm-up, bringing his unique style of broadcasting back onto the radio waves".

Johnny Vaughan: "They say there's nothing better than that 'new car' smell. Well, there is... it's the smell of a brand new drive time show on a brand new radio station being listened to in that brand new car! Great Britain needs great banter and I can't wait to be back on air five days a week talking to people up and down the UK as we get them home with a bit of a laugh and some awesome music!"

Ricky Wilson: "Xfm was the first station to invite me and the band down for a session, way before we were even called Kaiser Chiefs. They were right there for us and many, many other bands from the very beginning of their histories, through all incarnations, career ups and downs, break ups and come backs. Even talking recently to other bands and musicians about the station, everyone has very fond things to say about it, so it makes me both proud and excited to be right there at the beginning of a new chapter as Radio X launches as the new rebel of the airwaves".

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Metal Hammer to release mobile videogame
Metal Hammer magazine is launching a mobile videogame that will feature music from the Nuclear Blast label.

Titled 'Metal Hammer: Roadkill', the platform game allows players to run around hitting enemies with a big metal hammer. Obviously. And while they do so, they can listen to music by bands including Sabaton, Immortal, Suicide Silence, Exodus and Epica.

It'll be available on the Apple App Store on 15 Oct and then at some point in the future for Android users. Look at some screenshots here, why don't you?

  Approved: The Duke Spirit - Here Comes The Vapour
A decade ago The Duke Spirit were being lauded as the next big thing in British rock music on the back of their excellent debut album 'Cuts Across The Land'. In the intervening years, over the course of three years, you might say, they fizzled out somewhat. I bet you thought they'd split up. But no, they have not, and now they are back.

Working once again with their debut's co-producer Simon Raymonde, the band will release a new album, titled 'Kin', next year. "We took some time away. We had to loosen the grip, change the pattern. Let in fresh prana", says vocalist Leila Moss.

And so comes the album's first single, 'Here Comes The Vapour', a six minute testament to what a bit of a rest can do for a band's output. It's not a return to the urgency of 'Cuts Across The Land', but it's definitely the sound of a band re-invigorated.

You'll also be able to catch The Duke Spirit live at a one-off show at Wilton's Music Hall in London on 22 Oct. But first, here's 'Here Comes The Vapour'.
CLICK HERE to read and share online
 

Sam Smith records new Bond theme
Sam Smith has confirmed this morning that he's recorded the theme song for the new James Bond film 'Spectre'. Even though he denied that he was doing any such thing just a few months ago. Which I think makes the story here that Sam Smith is a massive liar.

Excitement/disappointment began to build yesterday when Smith tweeted a picture of a ring sporting the film's logo. Of course, it could have meant that he's just a big Bond fan. Or that he has a ring with a logo on it that looks a bit like one from a Bond film. Or maybe it was just a random picture he found and liked so much that he wanted to tweet it. But people do love to come up with tenuous theories, which they can then feel smug about on the rare occasions they're correct.

Tweeting less ambiguously this morning, and noting all the previous Bond song singers, Smith wrote: "This is one of the highlights of my career. I am honoured to finally announce that I will be singing the next Bond theme song. Am so excited to be a part of this iconic British legacy and join an incredible line-up of some of my biggest musical inspirations. I hope you all enjoy the song as much as I enjoyed making it".

The song, titled 'Writing's On The Wall', is set to have its grand premiere on 25 Sep, ahead of the film's release on 23 Oct. But in June, massive liar Smith told Capital FM that he "definitely" wasn't recording the next Bond song and that he thought Ellie Goulding was doing it. Then in July she posted a picture of herself outside Abbey Road Studios, which a lot of people took as confirmation of that fact.

And there was another theory doing the rounds more recently than that. Composer Robert Ziegler posted a load of photos of Radiohead in the studio on Saturday, before promptly deleting them. And because the concept of Radiohead recording a new album isn't enough for some people, many began proposing that one shot of an orchestra could mean that they were doing the Bond theme.

Well, bad luck idiots. Sam Smith is, has been, and will always be the singer of the 'Spectre' theme. Radiohead are just recording another stupid, boring album, like anyone could do.

Avicii has a few stories to tell. Fourteen, in fact. So you'd best get a cushion
In keen announcing mode after telling the world last week that he was cancelling all of his tour dates, Avicii has now revealed plans to release a new album on 2 Oct. He's calling it 'Stories' and it'll feature fourteen new tracks.

"All the songs have a story I wanted to tell", said the producer, explaining the title. "[It] refines what I didn't feel was perfect last time [on debut album 'True']. I think there are more layers to the songs than before, and every song has been written on acoustic guitar, so the structure is different".

One of those songs is new single 'For A Better Day', the video for which you can see here.

Slaves announce off-Dismaland show
Slaves have announced that they will play a one-off show in Weston-super-Mare on 25 Sep, after being duped into thinking they had been booked to play Banksy's nearby Dismaland.

The duo recently announced that they would be playing the anti-theme park as part of a series of live music shows at the venue. However, it turns out someone was pulling their leg and Pussy Riot will actually be playing when they thought they were going to be on.

In a post on Facebook, Slaves said: "We will not be playing at Dismaland on the 25 Sep. Some silly sausage pretending to be the organiser invited us to play a gig there and we naturally obliged. Turns out it wasn't genuine. Got done, good and proper. All is not lost though... As we know many of you had made plans to pay us a visit we have decided to play our own show in Weston Super Mare that night anyway!"

Well, that's nice. Full details of the show will be announced on the Slaves website today.

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Doc N Roll film festival to return for second year
Music documentary film festival Doc N Roll is to return for its second year, shifting from the Hackney Picturehouse to the new Picturehouse Central in Piccadilly.

Say its organisers: "This year we are delighted to return to London, bigger and better, for our second edition of the fest. The programme features fifteen fascinating premiere music documentaries, that showcase instigators and innovators in the spheres of rock, blues, soul, punk, hip hop and world music. A host of Q&As with the directors and their accomplices will provide further insight into what drives these mavericks and outlaws!"

The event will run from 25 Sep to 4 Oct. For more info and to see the full list of films being shown, take a look at the website here.

Google Play, Amon Tobin, James Arthur, more

Other notable announcements and developments today...

• Alex Vlassopulos, formerly off of digital music service provider Omnifone, has joined Google in a business development role within its Google Play wing, after just under a year as VP Of Business Development over at Rdio.

• Peugeot's new Fractal concept car features sound design by Amon Tobin. The producer has created a sound that "plays when the driver opens the doors using the smartwatch remote system. What follows is a unique electric coupé driving experience offering a wealth of sensory exploration". Yeah.

• Over a year since he 'moved on' from Syco, 2012 'X-Factor' winner James Arthur has revealed on Twitter that he has signed a new major label record deal and will release a new album in 2016.

• Ólafur Arnalds and Nils Frahm will release their third collaborative EP on 2 Oct. 'Loon' will feature five synth-based compositions. This is one of them, called 'Four'.

• Song, By Toad has released a new compilation featuring "the very finest lo-fi, slacker, outsider pop tunes Scotland has to offer", titled 'David Cameron's Eton Mess'. Listen here.

• Babymetal are set to play Wembley Arena on 2 Apr next year. I think we should all go.

Niall Horan foot fracture a mystery but probably not caused by a squirrel
One Direction's Niall Horan has fractured his foot, though he's unable to say when or how he sustained the injury.

In a Vine video with bandmate Louis Tomlinson, Horan said: "I woke up for the show the other day and I had a pain in my foot. Then I went to get an x-ray today and I've got a fractured right foot and I don't know how".

Last year, Horan underwent knee surgery to correct an ongoing injury that he sustained after being attacked by a squirrel in Battersea Park two years earlier. Six months later, the knee was still causing him pain - though largely because fans were throwing things at it.

And yes, as ever, I'm really only writing this so that I can remind myself of the time Niall Horan was attacked by a squirrel.

 
ANDY MALT | Editor
Andy heads up the team, overseeing the CMU bulletin and website, coordinating features and interviews, reporting on artist and business stories, and contributing to the CMU Approved column.
Email andy@unlimitedmedia.co.uk (except press releases, see below)
   
CHRIS COOKE | MD & Business Editor
Chris provides music business coverage and analysis. Chris also leads the CMU Insights training and consultancy business and education programme CMU:DIY, and heads up CMU publisher 3CM UnLimited.
Email chris@unlimitedmedia.co.uk (except press releases, see below)
   
SAM TAYLOR | Commercial Manager & Insights Associate
Sam oversees the commercial side of the CMU media, leading on sales and sponsorship, plus helps manage and deliver the CMU Insights training courses and consultancy services.
Email sam@unlimitedmedia.co.uk or call 020 7099 9060
   
CARO MOSES | Co-Publisher
Caro helps oversee the CMU media, while as a Director of 3CM UnLimited she heads up the company's other two titles ThisWeek London and ThreeWeeks Edinburgh, and supports other parts of the business.
Email caro@unlimitedmedia.co.uk
Send ALL press releases to musicnews@unlimitedmedia.co.uk - this is checked daily by the whole editorial team meaning your release will definitely get to the right person.

For details of the training and consultancy services offered by CMU Insights click here - Andy and Chris are also available to provide music business comment, just email them direct.

To promote your company or advertise jobs or services to the entire UK music industry via the CMU bulletin or website contact Sam on 020 7099 9060 or email ads@unlimitedmedia.co.uk
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