WEDNESDAY 9 SEPTEMBER 2015
TODAY'S TOP STORY: Sony/ATV overlord Marty Bandier has written to all of the major publisher's Nashville-based songwriters urging them to attend a meeting being staged by the National Music Publishers Association in the city later today where they will be updated about ongoing efforts to rewrite the so called consent decrees that regulate collective licensing in the US, and in... [READ MORE]
 
TODAY'S APPROVED: Fronted by former King Blues member Kat Marsh, and including Martin Grech amongst their line-up, Lionface are preparing to release their third EP, 'Battle', on 25 Sep. Almost two years on from their second EP, 'Beast', 'Battle' sharpens the band's hard edges while bringing more clarity to the melodies in Marsh's vocals. The result brings a significantly weightier punch to their... [READ MORE]
 
CMU PODCAST: CMU's Andy Malt and Chris Cooke review the week in music and the music business, including Tesco and Technics joining the much hyped vinyl revival, EMI Production Music's sample amnesty, the Canadian company accusing the majors of anti-competitive behaviour over public domain recordings, and Kanye West's bid to be President of the USA. The CMU Podcast is sponsored by 7digital... [LISTEN HERE]
TOP STORIES Sony/ATV chief writes to Nashville songwriters about a tricky development in consent decree reform
JUMP | ONLINE
LEGAL Safe harbours discussed at Westminster copyright debate, but only from the music camp
JUMP | ONLINE
LABELS & PUBLISHERS 2ManyDJs launch record label
JUMP | ONLINE
LIVE BUSINESS More information released about Festival Congress and Venues Day
Ents24 partners with See Tickets on ticket sellthrough
JUMP | ONLINE
ARTIST NEWS Iommi admits health concerns behind Black Sabbath farewell tour
Masked fake Elvis documentary to be screened in UK cinemas this month
JUMP | ONLINE
GIGS & FESTIVALS Chinese government cancels Bon Jovi shows
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AWARDS AIM Awards presented
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ONE LINERS Universal, Turn First Artists, Sony/ATV, more
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AND FINALLY... Abz from Five selling BRIT Award on eBay to buy soil
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Click JUMP to skip direct to a section of this email or ONLINE to read and share stories on the CMU website (JUMP option may not work in all email readers). For regular updates from Team CMU follow us on Twitter, Facebook or Tumblr.
 
 
THE O2 - EVENT SALES CO-ORDINATOR (LONDON)
The O2 is on the lookout for a fantastic new Event Sales Co-ordinator selling a diverse range of event spaces under The O2 tent; The O2 arena, Building Six (corporate hire), American Express Invites Lounge, Green Room, The Piazza and The Quadrant.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here
   
DOMINO - INTERNATIONAL PROMOTIONS APPRENTICE (LONDON)
Domino Recording Co is seeking an International Promotions Apprentice to join the International Department based in the London office. This is an interesting and varied role that will offer a good introduction to the specific skills needed to work in promotions and international.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here
   
DOMINO - INTERNATIONAL MARKETING MANAGER (LONDON)
Domino Recording Co is seeking an International Marketing Manager to join the International Department based in the London office. A very exciting opportunity for a dynamic marketing manager to join the Domino International team. The ideal candidate will have at least two years’ experience in music marketing, be familiar with Domino's output, aware of its history and will complement the company culture.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here
   
IMPRESSIVE PR - SENIOR MUSIC PUBLICIST (LONDON)
We need an experienced Senior Music Publicist who knows the job, has excellent music media contacts and potential to bring in their own clients. The role is all about personality - organised, friendly, positive, "can do" attitude, great journalist contacts and being able to juggle artists promo schedules, multiple releases and generate high volumes of coverage.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here
   
MERLIN - HEAD OF ROYALTIES (LONDON)
Merlin, the global rights licensing agency for the independent sector, is seeking an experienced professional to head its royalties division. Based in the company’s central London office, the successful candidate will demonstrate a deep knowledge and understanding of both practical and technical aspects of processing digital royalties, along with proven experience in a senior role within this sphere.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here
   
DOMINO - WAREHOUSE MANAGER (LONDON)
We are looking for a bright, energetic warehouse manager with plenty of enthusiasm to supervise our warehouse operation. The role could suit someone with existing warehouse experience, but also someone with a music retail background.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here
   
AIR MEDIA - PR MANAGER (LONDON)
Air Media is a creative, forward-thinking music and entertainment PR agency working with a variety of international stars, cutting edge bands, venues and festivals. We are looking for a music-obsessed individual with at least two years’ PR experience to join our small team in West London.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
PARAMOUNT ARTISTS - BOOKING AGENT (BRIGHTON)
Paramount Artists is a booking agency based in central Brighton. We arrange worldwide tours for DJ’s and electronic musicians. We are looking to expand our team and currently have an opening for a booking agent.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
MAMA & COMPANY - ASSISTANT GENERAL MANAGERS, ARTS CLUB, LIVERPOOL; HOXTON SQUARE BAR & KITCHEN AND THE BORDERLINE, LONDON (TEMPORARY CONTRACT)
MAMA & Company are looking for a dynamic, experienced Assistant General Managers with a proven track record within a live music operation to work at Arts Club, Liverpool and at our London venues. This is a fantastic opportunity to work and grow with an exciting company that owns some of London’s most established venues.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
MAMA & COMPANY - ASSISTANT BAR MANAGERS, LONDON VENUES
MAMA & Company is looking for Assistant Bar Managers for its London venues. You will have some experience of maximising bar, cloakroom and other revenues while minimising all relevant costs. You will have exceptional stock and staff management and must be driven to achieve the best results for the venue in support of the Bars Manager. Some experience of duty management within a live music venue would be beneficial.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
MAMA & COMPANY - PROMOTIONAL MANAGER - ARTS CLUB (LIVERPOOL)
MAMA & Company are looking for a dynamic Promotional Manager ideally with some experience within a live music operation to work at Arts Club, Liverpool. This is a fantastic opportunity to work and grow with an exciting company that owns some of the UK’s most established venues.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
 
CMU Jobs is a proven way to recruit the best music business talent for roles across the industry at all levels, from graduate to senior management. To book an ad contact Sam on 020 7099 9060 or email ads@unlimitedmedia.co.uk
 

Sony/ATV chief writes to Nashville songwriters about a tricky development in consent decree reform
Sony/ATV overlord Marty Bandier has written to all of the major publisher's Nashville-based songwriters urging them to attend a meeting being staged by the National Music Publishers Association in the city later today where they will be updated about ongoing efforts to rewrite the so called consent decrees that regulate collective licensing in the US, and in particular a proposal that has emerged of late to which the American publishers are very much opposed.

As previously reported, it was the music publishers themselves which lobbied for the decrees that govern the two biggest performing rights organisations in the US - ASCAP and BMI - to be reviewed and ultimately rewritten.

There are various changes the publishers would like to see, although for Sony/ATV objective number one is getting clearance for 'partial withdrawal' from the collective licensing system, so that publishers could continue to licence radio, live performance and such like through the collecting societies, but would be able to negotiate with digital services like Pandora directly, as already happens in Europe. Direct dealing with digital services would increase the publishers' negotiating power and therefore the rates they could demand.

The major publishers in America tried to pull digital out of collective licensing a few years back, but were told by the US courts that under the consent decrees they either had to license everything collectively or nothing collectively. Hence the demand from Sony/ATV et al that the decrees be reformed.

It seems likely that the US Department Of Justice, which oversees the consent decrees, will give the publishers many of the reforms they want. Though one proposal that surfaced recently - dubbed "100% licensing" - has not been welcomed by the music publishing sector. The proposal relates to co-written and therefore co-owned songs, which is many songs.

Currently if BMI controls half a song and ASCAP the other half, a licensee needs a licence from both societies to exploit the work. But under the proposed new system either society could offer a licence for the whole song, providing they then pass 50% of the money onto the other PRO.

Crucially, this would mean that if Sony/ATV started licensing Pandora directly, the digital service could still exploit any songs in the Sony repertoire where part of the copyright was still controlled by BMI and ASCAP without having a deal in place with the major. Which could weaken Sony/ATV's hand at the negotiating table (assuming Pandora was willing to remove from its service any songs wholly controlled by the Sony publisher).

Now, technically under US copyright law it is already possible - away from collective licensing - for one publisher to entirely license out a song in which it has a stake without consulting the other stakeholders, providing it passes on any revenue pro-rata, which is why DoJ officials are proposing applying this system to the PROs. Though in practice, even in the US licensees usually need to get agreements from each stakeholder separately. The DoJ's proposal, the publishers therefore argue, shows ignorance of common practice in the way song licensing deals are done.

Either way, Bandier is not impressed. In his letter to songwriters this week, he explains: "You may have written a song with a writer affiliated with a different PRO. Under 100% licensing, a streaming service could bypass you and your PRO and go to your collaborator's PRO to obtain a license for the entire song without your consent. You would then be subject to that PRO's royalty rate, even if it is lower than your PRO's rate, and you may have to depend on the other PRO, with which you have no relationship, to collect your share of royalties and account to you".

He goes on: "This would substantially disrupt the well-established practice of licensees entering into agreements with each PRO representing whatever piece of a song they control and create significant accounting inefficiencies as PROs would have to pay royalties to songwriters not affiliated with them".

Such a system might also hinder the creative process via which songwriters choose who to collaborate with, he adds: "Would you want to collaborate with someone signed to a different PRO if it meant you would be subject to a lower royalty rate? In addition, how would a writer whose song is licensed by a PRO that he or she is not affiliated with have any assurance that their royalties would be properly paid or paid at all?"

Concluding, Bandier writes: "These potential changes go to the heart of how performance rights have historically been licensed and how songwriters have always been paid. Requiring PROs to grant 100% licenses would be an unprecedented change to well-established licensing practices, create widespread administrative confusion and potentially undermine a songwriter's relationship with his or her chosen PRO".

So, to conclude, the US music publishing sector wants significant reform to the American collective licensing system, but not to that bit.

The major's Nashville writers are encouraged to attend today's NMPA meeting to learn more about the proposed changes and to "learn how you can potentially help". Though given Bandier's letter does a pretty good job of explaining what 100% licensing is and why he's against it, you sense that the real purpose of the NMPA meeting is to rally support so that songwriters and publishers can shout towards Washington as one about this particular bit of consent decree reform.

Safe harbours discussed at Westminster copyright debate, but only from the music camp
It's no secret that a top priority for the music rights industry in 2015 is reforming the safe harbours contained within European and US copyright law, which allow technology companies to avoid liability for copyright infringement committed by their customers via their servers or networks. Said firms benefit from the safe harbours providing they have a system for removing copyright infringing content from their platforms, if and when they are made aware of it by a rights owner.

As previously reported, record companies and music publishers don't have a problem with the principle of safe harbours, just with what kinds of companies are allowed to use them. ISPs? "Yes". Server hosting companies? "Yes". User-upload content platforms like YouTube, Daily Motion and SoundCloud? "No, no, no". But currently they do.

With European copyright laws up for review, the International Federation Of The Phonographic Industry officially placed safe harbours at the top of its agenda when revealing its latest set of record industry stats earlier this year. Since then other music industry trade bodies have also spoken up, though of late it is PRS For Music that has perhaps become most vocal on this issue, mainly via the Streamfair campaign it launched in July, and partly via its litigation against SoundCloud which, if it ever gets to court, will test European safe harbour laws as they currently stand.

And safe harbours also dominated a speech given by PRS's Head Of Legal, Policy & Public Affairs, Frances Lowe, to the Westminster Media Forum yesterday. "The UK's songwriters and composers play a significant role in the UK economy and its exports", she said. "And the EU is their most important market. And their current priority is securing fair income from the use of their music across the online ecosystem, so that careers can be sustained".

"Songwriters are currently being squeezed", she added, before targeting in particular the "user-upload platforms that are unlicensed or under-licensed" because they claim they are protected by safe harbours. This means they pay nothing or less for the songs they use, "despite the fact that without those songs they would not be able to raise capital, or pay their shareholders, or make a profit".

This not only affects songwriters, she argued, but also those streaming services which do licence all rights at market rates, and who are therefore at a disadvantage to the user-upload platforms, which usually provide a plethora of freemium content.

The problem, Lowe said, is a lack of clarity on what kinds of services can and cannot rely on the safe harbours, them stemming from laws written long before a YouTube or SoundCloud-style business model had even been conceived. And while she welcomed a recent German court ruling that arguably (though not unequivocally) sided with German collecting society GEMA on YouTube's responsibilities for policing uploaded content, Lowe said judicial interpretation had been inconsistent on this issue.

And while PRS presumably hopes to get some favourable and clear judicial interpretation if and when its SoundCloud litigation gets to court, Lowe noted that the European Commission had indicated copyright reforms might clarify the rules around safe harbours. "We support this proposal" she said. "Online services built on user-upload platforms which make content available to the public should not be able to plead safe harbour".

It was a straight-forward argument, though, interestingly, at an event where representatives from most copyright industries spoke, it was only the music rep who mentioned the safe harbours problem.

For the film, television and sports representatives on stage it seemed that the big issue with regards the current review of European copyright law is geo-blocking, and proposals that new laws force content providers to offer more multi-territory licences, to allow users to access content from abroad, and to ensure portability, so that a Netflix subscriber can still access his or her account wherever in the world they may connect to the internet.

The message from these rights owners is that demand for multi-territory licences is not as big as regulators think, that only a tiny minority of consumers are seeking streaming services that are portable beyond borders, and that new geo-blocking proposals currently being mooted around Brussels are unnecessary, and would favour major players over niche or national services to the detriment of diversity in the market. Basically the message was: "The market is addressing any problems already, so just leave things well alone".

The proposed new geo-blocking laws might throw up problems for the music industry too, though with labels, publishers and even collecting societies now increasingly moving to multi-territory licensing anyway, music rights owners are much less involved in this debate, while the TV, film and sports industries - while presumably not opposed to the music industry's call for clarifying and limiting safe harbours - are not especially pushing this agenda in political circles.

Which is only interesting in that politicians have short attention spans, and have a tendency to lump all copyright industries together when undertaking widespread reviews of IP law. When asked if the music industry would get its way on safe harbours in Europe, bearing in mind the power of the Google lobby, one music lawyer mused to CMU earlier this year "maybe if they get big TV and the Premiere League on board". But from yesterday's Westminster Media Forum, that is unlikely to happen, certainly in any active way.

Though if the music industry can speak as one - which in itself is unusual - perhaps there is still an opportunity here. Providing they have a good answer when Google's YouTube enters its inevitable response: "But we fixed all that with Content ID".

2ManyDJs launch record label
David and Stephen Dewaele - aka 2ManyDJs and the driving force(s) behind Soulwax - have announced that they are launching their own record label, called Deewee. Their first release will be a twelve-inch single by Klanken.

Who is Klanken? Well, that would be telling. Also, I don't know. But mystery's fun, right? As Resident Advisor reports, the Dewaele brothers have given little info, aside from saying that Klanken comes from their own hometown of Ghent in Belgium. Maybe they are actually Klanken themselves. Indie label bosses inventing alter-egos for themselves in order to boost their rosters? It'll never catch on.

Anyway, the double A-side features two tracks (because that is how double A-sides work), titled 'Drie and 'Twee'. You will able to buy the release from 19 Sep.

Before that, the Dewaele's and James Murphy will be bringing their Despacio soundsystem to London for three nights at the Roundhouse on 10-12 Sep.

More information released about Festival Congress and Venues Day
More updates this week on two upcoming events for the live sector. First of all the Association Of Independent Festivals has announced more details about this year's Festival Congress, which takes place on 5 and 6 Nov in Cardiff.

Speakers confirmed so far included Glastonbury Commercial Director Robert Richards, Lovebox's Rob Silver, Kendal Calling's Andy Smith and Zac Fox from Kilimanjaro Live, while Huw Stephens off of Radio 1 will keynote. Plus topics set to be covered in a programme of speedy presentations include policing, engaging government and how advertising has evolved. Info, tickets and all that gubbins is on the event's website.

Before all that, though, live music types will be gathering at the Ministry Of Sound in London for the second ever Venues Day from the Music Venue Trust which, as previously reported, this year takes place on 20 Oct.

And what's happening there? Well, as last year, it'll be a day of discussion around the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats facing independent music venues in the UK. Three themes have been chosen in order to compartmentalise the chat: Turning Words Into Action, Business Up - Be Inspired, and Costs Down - Be Efficient.

Grassroots-level venue owners can apply for free passes and travel assistance now by emailing beverley@musicvenuetrust.com. For everyone else, delegate passes will go on sale on Monday for £80, or £40 if you turn out to be a venue rep eligible for a 50% discount. More info on the Music Venue Trust website.

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Ents24 partners with See Tickets on ticket sellthrough
Online entertainment guide and ticketing hub Ents24 has announced a revamp of is Backstage event listing platform, which will see it partner with See Tickets to offer direct ticket sales.

Says Ents24's Adam Brooks: "Our partnership with See provides the best of both worlds; the ability to list events and sell tickets via a trusted, secure and recognised platform, and the benefits of promotion to one of the UK's largest audiences of live entertainment lovers - all for free and within a few clicks."

For his side, See Tickets' CCO Martin Fitzgerald adds: "We are pleased to be powering the refreshed Backstage platform with our ticketing technology and functionality. There's a natural and mutually beneficial fit between Ents24 and See - we are both committed to connecting fans to events and this new partnership is all about doing just that".

  Approved: Lionface
Fronted by former King Blues member Kat Marsh, and including Martin Grech amongst their line-up, Lionface are preparing to release their third EP, 'Battle', on 25 Sep.

Almost two years on from their second EP, 'Beast', 'Battle' sharpens the band's hard edges while bringing more clarity to the melodies in Marsh's vocals. The result brings a significantly weightier punch to their music, from which it benefits greatly.

Lionface will play a hometown show at The Louisiana in Bristol on the day the EP is released, followed by a London show at The Sebright Arms on 26 Sep. Prepare yourself by listening to lead 'Battle' track 'Vampire' here.
CLICK HERE to read and share online
 

Iommi admits health concerns behind Black Sabbath farewell tour
Black Sabbath guitarist Tony Iommi has admitted that his band's decision to head out on a farewell tour is down to his own health concerns.

"I can't actually do this anymore", he told the Birmingham Mail. "My body won't take it much more. All the travelling involved in Sabbath tours increasingly takes its toll. That's why we're going out on one last tour, to say our farewells. And then it very definitely is the end, we won't be doing it again".

As previously reported, Iommi was diagnosed with lymphoma in 2012. Although successfully treated, he is still awaiting the all clear, with tests ongoing to ensure that the cancer has not returned. Although admitting now that health problems are putting an end to the band's touring activity, earlier this year he denied that this was the reason for a cancellation of a previously planned farewell show.

So far the only dates announced for 'The End' tour are 24 stops in North America and Australasia. However, says Iommi, there will be further shows announced, with the full run expected to last a year.

"There will be UK dates", he said. "And, of course, we'll be playing Birmingham. This is where it all began for us; this is where family and friends live; this is where our longest-standing fans are. It would be unimaginable for the Sabbath farewell tour not to include Birmingham. But you'll have to bear with us. The logistics are still being worked out. Even we don't know all the dates yet".

He added that there was still a chance that drummer Bill Ward may join the rest of the band's original line-up on the tour. As previously reported, Ward pulled out of a reunion tour and album in 2012, over issues with his contract. He said earlier this year that he still felt that it was unlikely that he would ever rejoin the band.

However, asked if Ward might come on board for this last outing, Iommi said: "That depends on Bill. We met up again six weeks ago and we got on great - but it's down to Bill. Our plans as they stand are to tour with Ozzy, Geezer Butler, myself and Ozzy's drummer Tommy Clufetos, who did so well on the last tour. He can do things with drums that still amaze me. His solos last time out were mind-boggling".

I think it's probably fair to say that you will be able to see those solos for yourself, if you attend the finale Black Sabbath shows.

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Masked fake Elvis documentary to be screened in UK cinemas this month
The latest film from top class music documentary maker Jeanie Finlay, 'Orion: The Man Who Would Be King', will be screened in UK cinemas this month, with support from Creative England and Ffilm Cymru Wales.

The film follows the story of Jimmy Ellis, and man who popped on a mask and a jumpsuit in the 70s and 80s and convinced a surprisingly large number of people that he was the late Elvis Presley.

Says Finlay: "I am so excited to bring 'Orion: The Man Who Would Be King' to UK cinemas with the amazing support of Creative England and Ffilm Cymru Wales. It's been a long journey since I bought a record with a mysterious masked man on the cover twelve years ago and I was intrigued to discover the story of the man behind the mask. I've loved showing the film at festivals all over the world, now I'm excited to see what UK audiences make of Orion, my masked man".

The film will be shown in UK cinemas from 25 Sep, before going on sale on iTunes in October and screening on BBC Four's 'Storyville' in November.

Chinese government cancels Bon Jovi shows
Bon Jovi have had two concerts in China cancelled by officials in the country, over suspicions that they may support the Dalai Lama.

According to the Financial Times, the shows in Shanghai and Beijing, which would have been the band's first in China, were pulled by the Culture Ministry after it emerged that they had once featured a picture of the Dalai Lama in a video backdrop during a show in Taiwan.

China, of course, considers the Dalai Lama a terrorist due to his support for the campaign promoting the independence of Tibet, which has resulted in him living in exile in India.

Bon Jovi are not the first band to have concerts cancelled by the Chinese government. Maroon 5 had a show in Shanghai pulled earlier this year, after frontman Adam Levine tweeted birthday wishes to the Dalai Lama. Meanwhile, Björk has a lifelong band after shouting 'Tibet! Tibet!" during a show in the same city back in 2008.

AIM Awards presented
So, it was the Association Of Independent Music's Independent Music Awards in London last night, and if you were just expecting me to rock up this morning with a long list of winners and minimal preamble, well, you're a shrewd little thing. Or possibly psychic. Are you psychic? What stories will we be discussing on the CMU Podcast this week? Hmm, impressive stuff.

Though you probably want to subscribe to said Podcast, just to confirm your psychic powers are actually real come Friday morning. Hey, hang on, it's possible this intro to the list of winners from last night's Independent Music Awards has ended up being a big plug for the CMU Podcast. But our podcast is independent. And about music. And was recently nominated for an award. So see, totally relevant. And if you've got a problem with that, well, you can use your psychic powers to mind-read my response.

Anyway, anyway, winners. Well done one. And all. And everyone. And you. And them. And especially Young Fathers for winning the Xfm-sponsored Best Difficult Second Album Award. Presumably next year AIM will have to introduce a Best Banter Award for the all-new Radio X to sponsor. Hey, they could give that to the CMU Podcast. Although, I don't know that we're 'man' enough for Radio X.

Anyway, this ended up being a really long preamble. So your physic assumptions were wrong after all. Fraud.

Independent Track Of The Year: FKA Twigs - Two Weeks
Independent Album Of The Year: Enter Shikari - The Mindsweep
Independent Video Of The Year: Flying Lotus - Never Catch Me
Best Difficult Second Album: Young Fathers - White Men Are Black Men Too
Special Catalogue Release Of The Year: Cities Of Darkscorch Boardgame

Most Played New Independent Act: Jungle
Best Live Act: All Time Low
Hardest Working Band: Swans
Independent Breakthrough Of The Year: Wolf Alice

Independent Label Of The Year: Transgressive Records
Best Small Label: Erased Tape Records
Golden Welly Award For Best Independent Festival: Brainchild Festival

Indie Champion: Marc Riley, BBC 6 Music
Pioneer Award: Digby Pearson, Earache Records
Innovator Award: Peter Quicke, Matt Black and Jonathan More of Ninja Tune
Outstanding Contribution To Music: Skepta

Universal, Turn First Artists, Sony/ATV, more

Other notable announcements and developments today...

• Universal Music Publishing has signed one of those exclusive worldwide music publishing agreements with Jeff Bhaskar, the Grammy-winning producer-songwriter who co-produced 'Uptown Funk', amongst other things. "It's a thrill", said Universal Music Publishing CEO Jody Gerson, playing with the cliché a little there.

• Turn First Artists is reportedly negotiating a joint venture with Warner Music owner Access Industries which would seemingly involve collaborations between the management firm's artists and various businesses in which Access has interests, not just the mini major. Which is interesting because, as Billboard notes, Turn First has previously had an alliance with Universal.

• Sony/ATV has promoted Michèle Hamelink from its Amsterdam office to the music publisher's pan-European A&R team which is led by Guy Moot, and who is "excited" by this new development.

• Universal's US-based Capitol Music Group yesterday announced Gary Gorman as SVP Alternative Promotion, overseeing, well, alternative promotion for all of the division's labels. "Wholeheartedly", said his new boss Greg Thompson.

• Seemingly digging collaborations with funky tech start-ups of late, NME has announced a tie-up with a company called Amondo which allows users "to create visually rich, interactive stories from videos, photos and social posts and share them via the new Imprint format". No, I don't know what that means either, but presumably NME does.

• Hinds have announced that they will release their debut album, titled 'Leave Me Alone', on 8 Jan through Lucky Number. From it, this is 'Garden'.

• Tame Impala have announced that they will play the Manchester Arena on 11 Feb, followed by Alexandra Palace in London on 12 Feb. Tickets for both will go on sale on Friday.

• The Ja Ja Ja Nordic showcase night is launching a new event in Hamburg tonight, in addition to its London and Berlin residencies, with performances from Hey Elbow, Axel Flóvent and Lisa Alma.

Abz from Five selling BRIT Award on eBay to buy soil
Admit it, you'd quite like a BRIT Award. Maybe your talents have always been overlooked by the voting academy. Or you don't have any real talents. Or you don't have the money behind you to overcome having no real talents. But you've definitely always wanted one of those damn trophies in your house. Well, hot dang, if today isn't your lucky day, because Abz from Five is selling his on eBay.

Yes, people, this is your chance to pretend that YOU were voted Best Newcomer in 2000 (and also that your name is Abz and you were in Five). The singer turned farmer is getting shot of his award in order to "fund a delivery of topsoil and maybe some garden tools".

"Take advantage of my poverty and grab this rare opportunity to own a bit of pop history", says Abz in his eBay listing. "Good condition, light scratching (to be expected for age), one previous owner from new. Has been dropped and knocked a few times and is currently being used as a door stop".

He also promises that it "has been held by Jason Statham although I can not prove this".

The only barrier to you owning the BRIT Award that is RIGHTFULLY YOURS is that bidding is currently up over £1 million. Although I suspect some of those bids might not be entirely genuine. Whatever, chance your arm here.

 
ANDY MALT | Editor
Andy heads up the team, overseeing the CMU bulletin and website, coordinating features and interviews, reporting on artist and business stories, and contributing to the CMU Approved column.
Email andy@unlimitedmedia.co.uk (except press releases, see below)
   
CHRIS COOKE | MD & Business Editor
Chris provides music business coverage and analysis. Chris also leads the CMU Insights training and consultancy business and education programme CMU:DIY, and heads up CMU publisher 3CM UnLimited.
Email chris@unlimitedmedia.co.uk (except press releases, see below)
   
SAM TAYLOR | Commercial Manager & Insights Associate
Sam oversees the commercial side of the CMU media, leading on sales and sponsorship, plus helps manage and deliver the CMU Insights training courses and consultancy services.
Email sam@unlimitedmedia.co.uk or call 020 7099 9060
   
CARO MOSES | Co-Publisher
Caro helps oversee the CMU media, while as a Director of 3CM UnLimited she heads up the company's other two titles ThisWeek London and ThreeWeeks Edinburgh, and supports other parts of the business.
Email caro@unlimitedmedia.co.uk
Send ALL press releases to musicnews@unlimitedmedia.co.uk - this is checked daily by the whole editorial team meaning your release will definitely get to the right person.

For details of the training and consultancy services offered by CMU Insights click here - Andy and Chris are also available to provide music business comment, just email them direct.

To promote your company or advertise jobs or services to the entire UK music industry via the CMU bulletin or website contact Sam on 020 7099 9060 or email ads@unlimitedmedia.co.uk
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