FRIDAY 4 DECEMBER 2015
TODAY'S TOP STORY: So, here's the news for any of you that occupy the colourful intersection that sits in the middle of the Coldplay Fans/Spotify Users Venn diagram. Fuck you to fucking hell, you fucking fuckers. That's not me saying that. I'd never say that. That's Chris Martin. Those were his exact words. He yelped them. Loudly. Right in your face. So that a little bit of spit sprayed onto your nose... [READ MORE]
 
TODAY'S APPROVED: InnerSoul celebrates its fourth birthday tonight, teaming up with LDMusic to bring in the legendary LTJ Bukem to headline the show. LTJ Bukem is best known for working on the jazzier side of drum n bass of course, and as he teams up with MC GQ tonight we're sure to be in for a great DJ set. Also on the bill before him in Room One are Krust, Fabio (playing a classics set), Bryan G... [READ MORE]
   
BEEF OF THE WEEK: Much was written this week about the story of Kevin Wells, who through a mixture of luck and quick thinking found himself giving Public Enemy a lift to their show supporting The Prodigy at Sheffield Arena this week. In a Ford Focus. As everyone seemed very keen to point out. Chuck D and Flavor Flav had been doing a signing at the Record Collector record shop in the city... [READ MORE]
 
CMU PODCAST: CMU's Andy Malt and Chris Cooke review the week in music and the music business, including Adele's record-breaking release week, Cox Communications' dispute with BMG and Round Hill Music, Paul Weller's second win in his dispute with the Daily Mail, and Noisey's interview with the guy behind Dancing Jesus. The CMU Podcast is sponsored by 7digital... [LISTEN HERE]
TOP STORIES New Coldplay album not on Spotify as band keeps new record off freemium
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DEALS Jack Antonoff extends deal with Sony/ATV, launches own imprint
JUMP | ONLINE
LABELS & PUBLISHERS "Broad range of views" submitted to PRS review of live licensing
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LIVE BUSINESS Bataclan hopes to reopen before the end of 2016
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DIGITAL & D2F SERVICES Baidu Music mergers with Chinese record company
Music industry still tackling its new data challenges, says Revelator chief
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ARTIST NEWS Scott Weiland dies
Morrissey compares US Transportation Security Administration to ISIS
Quick Wikipedia edit gets Peking Duk fan backstage
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AND FINALLY... CMU Beef Of The Week #285: Taxi Driver v Public Enemy
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Click JUMP to skip direct to a section of this email or ONLINE to read and share stories on the CMU website (JUMP option may not work in all email readers). For regular updates from Team CMU follow us on Twitter, Facebook or Tumblr.
 
 
BASCA - MEMBER EVENTS/MARKETING CO-ORDINATOR (LONDON)
The British Academy Of Songwriters, Composers & Authors is seeking a Member Events And Marketing Co-ordinator.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
ROCKFEEDBACK - HEAD OF MARKETING & EDITORIAL (LONDON)
A crucial role at the RFB, this is a role for an ideally experienced person in the music industry, working with the Head Booker and full team on liaising with Booking Agents, Managers and the wider industry on constructing and actioning marketing plans and creative marketing ideas.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
ROCKFEEDBACK - ASSISTANT BOOKER / EVENTS CO-ORDINATOR (LONDON)
We are hiring for a fantastic entry level position for someone looking to become fully employed in the live music industry. The role will be working directly with the Head Booker on the booking of new talent and bringing new acts into the fold, forging new relationships with industry - agents / managers / artists. Watching a wealth of new acts and looking to work closely with new music.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
AEG EUROPE - RECRUITMENT MANAGER (LONDON)
AEG employ more than 3000 staff, our European division's headquarters are based in London where we run the world's most popular music and entertainment venue The O2, SSE Wembley Arena and Hammersmith Apollo. We are now looking for an expert recruiter.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
B-LINE FESTIVAL BARS - PRODUCTION MANAGER (LONDON)
The Production Manager role at B-Line Festival Bars is an exciting opportunity for a person with the right experience and career interests to work on a number of major outdoor music festivals and brand activations through primarily the provision of public bars.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
DOMINO - WAREHOUSE MANAGER (LONDON)
We are looking for a bright, energetic warehouse manager with plenty of enthusiasm to supervise our warehouse operation. The role could suit someone with existing warehouse experience, but also someone with a music retail background.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
MATERIAL MUSIC - LABEL MANAGER (LONDON)
Material are looking for an enthusiastic and dedicated Label Manager to work across their expanding in-house record labels and catalogue. Material are an innovative music company working across artist management, recordings and music marketing.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
INDIGO AT THE O2 - ASSISTANT BARS MANAGER (LONDON)
The successful candidate will be responsible for management of bar staff and assisting the bar manager in the day to day running of indigo at The O2.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
NAME PR - ACCOUNT MANAGER (LONDON)
Name PR is looking to hire an Account Manager. This is a fantastic opportunity for a talented professional working in music business communications to start managing campaigns for some of the UK and Europe’s most forward-thinking organisations.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
STRONGROOM STUDIOS - RECEPTIONIST AND BOOKING ASSISTANT (LONDON)
Strongroom Studios are looking for a self-motivated and organised Receptionist and Bookings Assistant with a 'can do’ attitude to join their team. The successful candidate will assist the studio manager in organising studio bookings as well as manning the reception desk, taking telephone calls and aiding visitors to the studio.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
BELIEVE DIGITAL - EXPERIENCED RECORD LABEL ROYALTY MANAGER (LONDON)
We are looking for an experienced royalty manager to join our UK team based in London. The role is in our finance department and working with both the artist & label services division and our in house record label. The candidate will be assisting and reporting directly to Believe Digital’s UK Managing Director and General Manager.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
SUNDAY BEST - PRODUCT MANAGER (LONDON)
Sunday Best Recordings, home to artists Valerie June, David Lynch, Kitty Daisy and Lewis plus a host of new signings are set for a busy 2016. A Product Manager position is available for an enthusiastic individual with a creative attitude.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
 
CMU Jobs is a proven way to recruit the best music business talent for roles across the industry at all levels, from graduate to senior management. To book an ad contact Sam on 020 7099 9060 or email ads@unlimitedmedia.co.uk
 
 
A guide to upcoming events from and involving CMU, including seminars, masterclasses and conference sessions from CMU Insights and workshops from CMU:DIY, plus other events where CMU journalists are speaking or moderating.
 
07 Dec 2015 CMU Insights Masterclass: Navigating The Digital Market
CLICK FOR INFO
10 Dec 2015 CMU:DIY x Urban Development Industry Takeover Seminar
CLICK FOR INFO
18 Jan 2016 CMU Insights Seminars: How The Music Business Works Programme
CLICK FOR INFO
18 Jan 2016 CMU Insights Seminar: Making Money From Music
CLICK FOR INFO
25 Jan 2016 CMU Insights Seminar: How Music Rights Work
CLICK FOR INFO
1 Feb 2016 CMU Insights Seminar: How Music Licensing Works
CLICK FOR INFO
8 Feb 2016 CMU Insights Seminar: The Music Rights Sector
CLICK FOR INFO
10 Feb 2016 CMU Insights Masterclass: Key Developments In Music Rights
CLICK FOR INFO
15 Feb 2016 CMU Insights Seminar: The Live Sector, Brand Partnerships & Fan Services
CLICK FOR INFO
22 Feb 2016 CMU Insights Seminar: Building A Fanbase - Social Media Tools
CLICK FOR INFO
29 Feb 2016 CMU Insights Seminar: Building A Fanbase - Music Media
CLICK FOR INFO
6 Mar 2016 CMU Insights Seminar: Building A Fan-Orientated Business
CLICK FOR INFO
6 May 2016 CMU Insights @ Canadian Music Week 2016
CLICK FOR INFO
19-20 May 2016 CMU Insights @ The Great Escape 2016
CLICK FOR INFO
 

New Coldplay album not on Spotify as band keeps new record off freemium
So, here's the news for any of you that occupy the colourful intersection that sits in the middle of the Coldplay Fans/Spotify Users Venn diagram. Fuck you to fucking hell, you fucking fuckers. That's not me saying that. I'd never say that. That's Chris Martin. Those were his exact words. He yelped them. Loudly. Right in your face. So that a little bit of spit sprayed onto your nose. He was right angry about it. Albeit only in my head.

By which, I mean, Coldplay's only slightly tedious new long playing record 'A Head Full Of Dreams' is not available on Spotify as it goes live everywhere else this morning. Though, those of you who follow these matters on an academic level might like to know that this is a Swiftonian Boycott not an Adelian Stand. In that Coldplay are allowing their new album to stream, but not on services that are partly or entirely free-to-access.

Which brings us back to that old question: why doesn't Spotify allow premiere league artists to window their new releases so that they become available to the service's paying premium users first, subsequently arriving on freemium several weeks or months down the line? Because 'A Head Full Of Dreams', which is already available on premium-only streaming platforms like Apple Music, could be in the ears of all those premium Spotify scamps this very morn if only their stream-provider-of-choice would offer that flexibility.

Surely that would be a good move for Spotify too, as well as the artists who don't like their brand new musical business being made available to all for free, because it would provide a very compelling reason for the free users to upgrade, ie exactly what Spotify wants/needs them to do. Though presumably Spotify fears opening the floodgates, wondering quite who it is who decides which artists are sufficiently premium to qualify for such windowing. So, it's all or nothing on the Spotifys, which is why 'A Head Full Of Dreams' is absent as of today.

Though, unlike Swift, who pulled from the Spotify platform entirely over this issue, Coldplay's back catalogue remains on service - as do two singles off the new LP - and it's thought the whole shebang will filter through at some point in the future. In the meantime Spotify users will have to make do with listening to something supremely superior elsewhere in the service's catalogue. This is a personal favourite.

In other news, Coldplay will be doing the halftime show at the Super Bowl next February. It'll be like the closing ceremony to the London Paralympics all over again. But hopefully less shit. Though presumably the band's stint won't be included in the telecast of the big game, because that would mean people getting access to Coldplay music for free.

Jack Antonoff extends deal with Sony/ATV, launches own imprint
Sony/ATV has extended its worldwide publishing deal with Bleachers and Fun's Jack Antonoff, and launched a new joint venture publishing company with the singer-songwriter called Rough Customer.

A lot of people decided that they had something to say about this when it was announced earlier this week, so bear with me. First up, Sony/ATV CEO Marty Bandier, who said: "Jack is one of our most important and successful songwriters and I'm delighted that he will be part of our team for a considerable time to come. I'm especially pleased that we have entered into a new JV with him that will make him a magnet for other great songwriters and collaborators".

Sony/ATV US's Co-President Rick Krim then added: "We are very excited to be expanding our relationship with someone as multi-talented and with such a great track record as Jack. He provides an incredible triple threat as a writer, producer and recording artist, as well as having an amazing gift for finding and nurturing new artists".

Sony/ATV SVP Creative Jennifer Knoepfle noticed that no one had yet said that they were "thrilled", so chipped in with: "We are thrilled to be extending our deal with Jack Antonoff. Beyond his achievements as frontman for the beloved Bleachers and as a Grammy-winning songwriter and guitar player in Fun, Jack is a well-respected and in-demand songwriter and producer. We are also overjoyed to expand our relationship with Jack with a newly-formed JV. On top of being a great songwriter, Jack has a keen eye for spotting and developing talent and we are so happy he is taking this journey with Sony/ATV".

Jack Antonoff himself commented: "Sony/ATV is a place where I feel fully supported in creating all the things I dream about doing. It's a place where I feel that my songs are safe and I continue to grow. The next step for me is our imprint, Rough Customer. I want to create a place for writers and artists to collaborate and make great work. I want to create an environment where they don't have to be fearful of people breathing down their necks to underachieve artistically. I believe all music, mainstream included, can make the world a better place when the quality and integrity of it is the highest possible. That's what I want to contribute to".

And not wanting to be left out, the musician's manager Tyler Childs screeched: "We couldn't be happier to continue Jack's incredible creative relationship with Sony/ATV. We're lucky to have Marty, Rick, and Jenn as partners beyond publishing and fortunate to work with Brian Monaco and his incredible sync team at Sony/ATV, especially Wende Crowley's group on the West Coast. The creation of Rough Customer is the next logical step in Jack's creative journey and the culmination of years of planning. Rough Customer is going to deliver the service of a start-up with the muscle of the biggest publisher in the world. We see it as the best of both worlds for artists and songwriters".

Rough Customer will apparently work mainly with artists who Antonoff is currently collaborating with. The first signing is yet to be revealed. They're probably still writing all the quotes.

"Broad range of views" submitted to PRS review of live licensing
The music publishing sector's collecting society PRS For Music has confirmed that it received 111 direct responses to its consultation on the way the organisation licenses concerts and such like.

Promoters of gigs, tours and festivals need a licence from PRS, of course, because their shows exploit the so called performing rights of songs represented by the collecting society and its affiliates around the world. This is true even when artists perform their own songs, because if they have joined PRS or another collective licensing body (outside the US) they will have given that society exclusive control over the performing rights in their work.

For most shows, PRS takes a nominal percentage of ticketing income, but earlier this year the society announced it was reviewing its 'Popular Music Concerts Tariff' (or 'Tariff LP'), despite having only conducted its last review five years ago, that time deciding to keep things as they were. It's thought this review, though, will result in changes to the live licensing system in the UK.

Which is why so many people have an opinion on the matter. The 111 responses include representations from every strand of the live community, as well as the PRS membership, and across the various submissions, says the society, there is "a broad range of views". A summary of the responses has been published online.

Says PRS Commercial Director Paul Clements: "We thank our customers, members and trade bodies for providing their views and comments throughout the consultation process, the purpose of which was to provide us with additional insight and knowledge into reviewing PRS For Music's Tariff LP, set by the UK Copyright Tribunal back in 1988".

He added: "We very much appreciate the input of those who provided considered answers and thought in their responses. It has been a productive process in raising a range of considerations which we will now address in further engagement with the industry. Through collaborative discussions, we aim to determine a tariff that is fit for purpose and recognises the valuable contribution that our songwriters and publishers make to the live music industry".

Those collaborative discussions will now begin, with PRS hoping to present a draft revised tariff for the live sector next spring, which said live sector may or may not take back to the Copyright Tribunal - the court that intervenes when collecting societies and licensees cannot agree on rates. Who knows what will happen. Though I do have a new copyright tribunal hat on order.

Bataclan hopes to reopen before the end of 2016
The management at Bataclan, the Paris venue where the most deadly of the recent attacks in the French capital occurred, have said the theatre should re-open before the end of next year, though there is still much work to be done before they can get to that point.

Olivier Poubelle and Jules Frutos, who jointly manage the Bataclan and own 30% of the venue, have told news agency AFP that they want to re-open as soon as possible, but that they need to assess what changes are needed, plan for redevelopment of the space, and seek clearances from various authorities.

Frustos conceded that "it will be a long road before we get there", but confirmed he was hopeful the venue could still re-open its doors before the end of 2016. Two of the venue's staff, who weren't on duty at the time, were killed in the attacks, though Frustos confirmed that his workforce were also keen to get the venue back into operation, with a "real desire" to see music play once again inside the building.

As previously reported, the band playing during the Bataclan attack, Eagles Of Death Metal, have already expressed an interest in being the first act to play when the theatre re-opens, with frontman Jesse Hughes telling Vice: "Our friends went there to see rock n roll and died. I want to go back there and live".

Baidu Music mergers with Chinese record company
Chinese online service Baidu Music, the legitimate music set-up from search engine Baidu - which was a foe of the music industry for many years before doing its licensing deals - has announced plans to merge with the Beijing-based record company Taihe Entertainment Group.

The web firm says that the deal constitutes "the first-ever full integration of a leading internet platform and a traditional music company". Which is probably true, though Vevo is a digital music service owned by traditional music firms - albeit one that operates pretty autonomously from its parent companies - and the majors are partners in Japan-based Line Music too. Meanwhile, in China, a number of labels have formed partnerships with Baidu rival Tencent that go beyond traditional licensing deals.

Still, it's an interesting alliance in an interesting market. "The two partners each contribute strategically valuable and complementary resources and expertise to the new company", a statement about the merger claimed.

"With over 150 million monthly active users, Baidu Music is the first stop for Chinese music fans looking for the music they want online, and brings the power of search technology, big data, and massive online infrastructure to the new company. Taihe Entertainment Group has deep experience in music operations and licensing, and holds the rights to over 700,000 recordings with tremendous commercial value, along with long-term co-operation agreements with hundreds of international and domestic music institutions".

The two companies reckon that, with the copyright regime being ramped up in China, many opportunities lie ahead in the digital music space in the market, and that the Baidu/Taihe alliance puts them in a good position to capitalise on all that. We'll see, I guess.

--------------------------------------------------

Music industry still tackling its new data challenges, says Revelator chief
The music industry is still very much tackling its streaming-era data challenges, according to Bruno Guez, founder of the previously reported music data start-up Revelator, who discusses his new business, the music industry's data dilemmas and the much talked-up blockchain in a new interview that appears in the next edition of the CMU Trends Report.

"I think there are very few that have the technology stack to deal with it", Guez tells CMU, when asked whether record companies, music publishers and collecting societies were now getting on top of the flood of usage data that comes in from the streaming platforms each month.

"Some of our customers process more than 300 million lines a month", he reveals. "A good independent label will process something between 30-50 million lines of data a month, a large distributor will process around 300-500 million lines, a major can process a billion lines a day. We're dealing with big data and none of the companies are used to receiving 500 reports a month, and they don't have the 'parsers' or the cloud solution to ingest them efficiently".

"It could take you two to four hours to process the data", he goes on. "A large YouTube or Spotify file can't open in Excel, as it doesn't support a file bigger than 1GB, and a Spotify file can easily be 4.5GB, YouTube could have 4 million lines in a file, but you can't even open it! So I don't think many labels, publishers or rights societies have yet found a way of managing this problem efficiently. So they outsource it, or are interested in Revelator's solution as we are built for scale and we really simplify the process".

Aside from having a system capable of processing the quantities of data the streaming sector now dumps on rights owners each month, there is also the much previously discussed issue of copyright ownership information, and the lack of a central database that tells services who controls and benefits from each song and recording copyright in each territory. There are plenty of standalone databases that have some of that data, some of which are publicly accessible, but there is no one-stop shop. The publishing sector's Global Repertoire Database project collapsed, and even that would only have covered song copyrights.

Everyone agrees better copyright ownership data is needed, but will that come from within or outside the industry? "I do think that a start-up is a lot more likely to crack this than the industry itself", Guez says. "A start-up is providing a solution to a problem, I don't think the industry is necessarily looking to solve the problem. The start-up is looking to achieve a specific 'use case' and they'll be very resourceful in scraping the data together, tapping into different APIs and everything they need to prove their use case. There is no reason the industry would do that, it benefits the copyright beneficiaries, but not necessarily the industry".

He goes on: "A start-up would do it as the beneficiaries would be their customers essentially. A start-up has an inherent reason for being a catalyst of change, they don't necessarily care to be governed by industry politics. I think the specific ownership and beneficiaries info will ultimately always need to be kept private - I don't think that information should be public - but the central database can be a way of contacting the artist's representative. I do think there should be say a Yellow Pages of all the songwriters, producers, artists and so on".

You will be able to read the full interview with Guez in the final CMU Trends Report of 2015, out soon, which also include features on data and the blockchain, the recent debates around the making available right, and the five digital challenges the music industry faces in 2016. To receive the Trends Report as it is published you need to become a premium subscriber for just £5 a month. Click here to get sorted.

  Vigsy's Club Tip: InnerSoul and LDMusic present LTJ Bukem at Lightbox
InnerSoul celebrates its fourth birthday tonight, teaming up with LDMusic to bring in the legendary LTJ Bukem to headline the show.

LTJ Bukem is best known for working on the jazzier side of drum n bass of course, and as he teams up with MC GQ tonight we're sure to be in for a great DJ set. Also on the bill before him in Room One are Krust, Fabio (playing a classics set), Bryan G, Random Movement, Phil Tengent, Ascension, Al Meno and Soula.

Meanwhile, in Room Two, you'll find Utah Jazz, Furney, Dave Owen, MsDos and DJ Sweetpea.

InnerSoul know how to put on a great party, so be sure to head down.

Friday 4 Dec, Lightbox, 6A South Lambeth Place, London SW8 1SP, 11pm - 7am, £8-25. More info here.
CLICK HERE to read and share online
 

Scott Weiland dies
Former Stone Temple Pilots frontman Scott Weiland was found dead yesterday, while touring with his new band The Wildabouts. He was 48. The cause of death is yet to be confirmed.

Weiland's wife Jamie confirmed the news to the LA Times, while a statement on the singer's Facebook page reads: "Scott Weiland, best known as the lead singer for Stone Temple Pilots and Velvet Revolver, passed away in his sleep while on a tour stop in Bloomington, Minnesota, with his band The Wildabouts. At this time we ask that the privacy of Scott's family be respected".

According to Billboard, local police confirmed that a man's body was found in a vehicle, thought to be the band's tour bus, in Bloomington yesterday evening. The Wildabouts had been due to perform at the nearby Medina Entertainment Center last night. "Officers arrived and determined the adult male was deceased", said a statement.

Weiland, also known for his stint as frontman of Velvet Revolver, the band he formed with ex-Guns N Roses members Slash, Duff McKagan and Matt Sorum, had a long history of substance abuse and this led to numerous run-ins with the law.

This is the second death to hit The Wildabouts this year. Guitarist Jeremy Brown died of a drug overdose in March, the day before the release of the band's debut album, 'Blaster'.

--------------------------------------------------

Morrissey compares US Transportation Security Administration to ISIS
Competing with Thom Yorke for silliest comparison of the week, Morrissey has compared the US Transportation Security Administration to ISIS for failing to investigate a sexual assault claim he made against one of their employees.

As previously reported, Morrissey claimed that while going through security at San Francisco International Airport in July, a member of staff groped his penis and testicles. At the time, a spokesperson for TSA said: "Upon review of closed circuit TV footage, TSA determined that the supervised officer followed standard operating procedures in the screening of this individual".

Commenting on his True To You website, Morrissey said: "TSA have ignored my official and legal and constitutional complaint. From this we gather that TSA stands for Thorough Sexual Assault. If you are traveling through San Francisco International Airport you must be ready for a full sexual attack by people who claim to have your interests at heart. It is unlikely that ISIS would stoop so low".

Though presumably Morrissey isn't planning to walk through an ISIS security checkpoint to confirm that assumption.

--------------------------------------------------

Quick Wikipedia edit gets Peking Duk fan backstage
A fan of Australian duo Peking Duk managed to get backstage at one of their shows this week by quickly editing their Wikipedia page to show that he was related to one of the group.

The band were surprise guests at a launch party for Heineken's James Bond brand partnership. Apparently about to leave the event after their performance, fan David Spargo decided to chance his arm and see if he could get backstage to meet him.

The security guard, dubious of Spargo's claim to be Reuben Styles' step-brother, asked for proof. Spargo fumbled with his phone for a moment and showed that the duo's Wikipedia page lists him as a family member - the sneaky edit having been made during that fumbling. And so it was that he was waved through.

"Peking Duk's set finished and I was about to head home", Spargo told The Guardian. "Then I just had a lightbulb-above-the-head kind of moment and thought, yeah, I'll give it a crack. No harm in trying, is there?"

After being taken backstage, he was told to wait for someone to collect him, at which point doubts started to creep into his mind: "I stood out there for five minutes and I started to think this isn't going to work. Then Reuben pops his head out and is like, hey bro, come on in".

"It was probably the most genius, mastermind move that I've ever witnessed", said Styles' bandmate Adam Hyde. "We ended up having a bunch of beers with him and he was an absolute legend. He wasn't a creep or anything. He was like the most normal dude we've ever met. That's what makes it more hilarious".

"He is 007", added Hyde of Spargo's efforts, ensuring that everything stayed on brand. "He's probably still drinking, the dirty dog. That, or trying to infiltrate someone else's green room".

CMU Beef Of The Week #285: Taxi Driver v Public Enemy
Much was written this week about the story of Kevin Wells, who through a mixture of luck and quick thinking found himself giving Public Enemy a lift to their show supporting The Prodigy at Sheffield Arena this week. In a Ford Focus. As everyone seemed very keen to point out.

Chuck D and Flavor Flav had been doing a signing at the Record Collector record shop in the city, and with 45 minutes to go before they were due on stage realised that their taxi had already gone without them.

"They asked, 'anyone got a car to take us to the gig?'" Wells told BBC News. "I replied, 'I will take you, I've got a Ford Focus down the road'".

That doesn't sound like a sentence anyone would actually say, but at least it illustrates my point about the Ford Focus.

Rushing to the arena, scooting down all the back streets, the journey was not uneventful. "We were chatting away, but the phone was constantly going as their management were clearly worried", Wells told the Sheffield Star. "Then as we were coming through Attercliffe, 'Bohemian Rhapsody' by Queen came on the radio. Everyone was singing the words and rocking out in the back of my car, it was like a 'Wayne's World' moment. I was looking in the rear view mirror thinking, 'Is this actually happening?'"

Just to make sure, Wells snapped a selfie with his passengers before they got out of his Ford Focus. The final hurdle just being security at the venue.

"They looked at me a bit funny, as if to say: 'Yeah right we've heard that before'", he explained of the moment he told the guard that he had Public Enemy in the back of his Ford Focus. "But then Chuck D flashed his pass and the attendant looked flustered and said: 'Yes, I'm sorry, come through' and he directed us to the backstage area".

So, all's well that ends well. Chuck and Flav were through the door fifteen minutes before their stage time, and no one watching knew how close they came to missing their slot. But there's one person everyone's forgotten in this story: Public Enemy's taxi driver.

What's the deal there? Why did they flee the scene? Sure, the signing overran a little. That's the problem with signings - too many fans and too little time. Well, you'd hope, anyway. Public Enemy are accommodating chaps, they want to try and meet and greet as many people as possible, so they hang on a bit longer.

Surely if you're booking a taxi for Public Enemy, you might mention that they're a bunch of famous rappers who are playing a show at a nearby arena. Maybe even say to start the meter running from the time the taxi is booked for, rather than when they actually sit down in the back, to compensate for any rock n roll style delays.

Perhaps they did all that. Which leaves one question: What is the taxi drivers of Sheffield's beef with Public Enemy? Did something happen when they headlined the Tramlines festival two years ago? Did someone from Sheffield once eat a bad piece of chicken cooked by Flavor Flav? Maybe they're angry that the group's latest album, 'Man Plans, God Laughs', is only 28 minutes long.

Whatever the answer, someone from the Sheffield taxi community must now come forward and do whatever is necessary to bring an end to this dispute before it gets out of hand.

Also, has anyone confirmed that the taxi driver was not driving a Ford Focus?

 
ANDY MALT | Editor
Andy heads up the team, overseeing the CMU bulletin and website, coordinating features and interviews, reporting on artist and business stories, and contributing to the CMU Approved column.
Email andy@unlimitedmedia.co.uk (except press releases, see below)
   
CHRIS COOKE | MD & Business Editor
Chris provides music business coverage and analysis. Chris also leads the CMU Insights training and consultancy business and education programme CMU:DIY, and heads up CMU publisher 3CM UnLimited.
Email chris@unlimitedmedia.co.uk (except press releases, see below)
   
SAM TAYLOR | Commercial Manager & Insights Associate
Sam oversees the commercial side of the CMU media, leading on sales and sponsorship, plus helps manage and deliver the CMU Insights training courses and consultancy services.
Email sam@unlimitedmedia.co.uk or call 020 7099 9060
   
CARO MOSES | Co-Publisher
Caro helps oversee the CMU media, while as a Director of 3CM UnLimited she heads up the company's other two titles ThisWeek London and ThreeWeeks Edinburgh, and supports other parts of the business.
Email caro@unlimitedmedia.co.uk
Send ALL press releases to musicnews@unlimitedmedia.co.uk - this is checked daily by the whole editorial team meaning your release will definitely get to the right person.

For details of the training and consultancy services offered by CMU Insights click here - Andy and Chris are also available to provide music business comment, just email them direct.

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