FRIDAY 11 DECEMBER 2015
TODAY'S TOP STORY: We could find out later today what rates will be paid in the coming years to the record industry by US-based online radio services that rely on the SoundExchange licence, with America's Copyright Royalty Board due to announce the conclusion of its recent review of webcasting royalties any day now. Its deadline is actually next week, though various sources... [READ MORE]
 
TODAY'S APPROVED: Back in the summer, Modeselektor's 50Weapons label announced that it was winding down after ten years, having reached its target of 50 single releases. And this night pretty much cements it. The label bosses themselves will headline this grand finale party at Hackney's Oval Space and Pickle Factory. As well as a 'secret special guest', a big draw on the line-up... [READ MORE]
 
BEEF OF THE WEEK: The Grammy Awards nominations came out this week. And those who could be bothered to trawl through all 83 categories noted that there were a few omissions. That's the way awards work, of course. Not everyone can be nominated for an award. Even at the Grammys, where it seems to have been specifically designed so that everyone gets a crack. Some people reckon... [READ MORE]
 
CMU PODCAST: CMU's Andy Malt and Chris Cooke review the week in music and the music business, including Spotify considering windowing releases off its freemium service, the European Commission’s Digital Single Market review, Labour's proposals on the agent of change principle, and the Wu Tang Clan's single-copy album buyer. The CMU Podcast is sponsored by 7digital... [LISTEN HERE]
TOP STORIES US Copyright Royalty Board could rule on Pandora royalties today
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LEGAL Elvis estate suing on digital royalties
The Weeknd sued over alleged The Hills sample
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LABELS & PUBLISHERS Spotify economics chief collates figures to estimate value of music rights in 2014: $25.28 billion
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LIVE BUSINESS Live Nation sells MAMA venue in Hoxton
Adele saved fans over £4 million by blocking touts
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MEDIA Clash magazine returns to print with 100th edition next year
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GIGS & FESTIVALS Public Service Broadcasting to perform at London's Science Museum
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ONE LINERS Imagem, Ole, Harvest, more
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AND FINALLY... CMU Beef Of The Week #286: Cash Money v Drake
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Click JUMP to skip direct to a section of this email or ONLINE to read and share stories on the CMU website (JUMP option may not work in all email readers). For regular updates from Team CMU follow us on Twitter, Facebook or Tumblr.
 
 
CONVERGENCE FESTIVAL - MARKETING CO-ORDINATOR (LONDON)
Taking place at multiple venues over 10-20 March 2016 Convergence is a celebration of music pioneers, visual artists and technologists. This role is required to implement Convergence 2016 marketing plan as set by the festival’s Marketing Director.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
MARKETING MANAGER (MUSIC & ARTS FESTIVAL) (LONDON)
You will join a small, young and energetic team of events organisers to take over the delivery of the festival marketing strategy. Your skills and expertise will be used to build on our previous success and support the festival growth with increased ticket sales and a strengthening brand profile.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
BASCA - MEMBER EVENTS/MARKETING CO-ORDINATOR (LONDON)
The British Academy Of Songwriters, Composers & Authors is seeking a Member Events And Marketing Co-ordinator.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
ROCKFEEDBACK - HEAD OF MARKETING & EDITORIAL (LONDON)
A crucial role at the RFB, this is a role for an ideally experienced person in the music industry, working with the Head Booker and full team on liaising with Booking Agents, Managers and the wider industry on constructing and actioning marketing plans and creative marketing ideas.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
ROCKFEEDBACK - ASSISTANT BOOKER / EVENTS CO-ORDINATOR (LONDON)
We are hiring for a fantastic entry level position for someone looking to become fully employed in the live music industry. The role will be working directly with the Head Booker on the booking of new talent and bringing new acts into the fold, forging new relationships with industry - agents / managers / artists. Watching a wealth of new acts and looking to work closely with new music.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
AEG EUROPE - RECRUITMENT MANAGER (LONDON)
AEG employ more than 3000 staff, our European division's headquarters are based in London where we run the world's most popular music and entertainment venue The O2, SSE Wembley Arena and Hammersmith Apollo. We are now looking for an expert recruiter.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
B-LINE FESTIVAL BARS - PRODUCTION MANAGER (LONDON)
The Production Manager role at B-Line Festival Bars is an exciting opportunity for a person with the right experience and career interests to work on a number of major outdoor music festivals and brand activations through primarily the provision of public bars.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
DOMINO - WAREHOUSE MANAGER (LONDON)
We are looking for a bright, energetic warehouse manager with plenty of enthusiasm to supervise our warehouse operation. The role could suit someone with existing warehouse experience, but also someone with a music retail background.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
MATERIAL MUSIC - LABEL MANAGER (LONDON)
Material are looking for an enthusiastic and dedicated Label Manager to work across their expanding in-house record labels and catalogue. Material are an innovative music company working across artist management, recordings and music marketing.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
INDIGO AT THE O2 - ASSISTANT BARS MANAGER (LONDON)
The successful candidate will be responsible for management of bar staff and assisting the bar manager in the day to day running of indigo at The O2.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
NAME PR - ACCOUNT MANAGER (LONDON)
Name PR is looking to hire an Account Manager. This is a fantastic opportunity for a talented professional working in music business communications to start managing campaigns for some of the UK and Europe’s most forward-thinking organisations.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
STRONGROOM STUDIOS - RECEPTIONIST AND BOOKING ASSISTANT (LONDON)
Strongroom Studios are looking for a self-motivated and organised Receptionist and Bookings Assistant with a 'can do’ attitude to join their team. The successful candidate will assist the studio manager in organising studio bookings as well as manning the reception desk, taking telephone calls and aiding visitors to the studio.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
BELIEVE DIGITAL - EXPERIENCED RECORD LABEL ROYALTY MANAGER (LONDON)
We are looking for an experienced royalty manager to join our UK team based in London. The role is in our finance department and working with both the artist & label services division and our in house record label. The candidate will be assisting and reporting directly to Believe Digital’s UK Managing Director and General Manager.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
SUNDAY BEST - PRODUCT MANAGER (LONDON)
Sunday Best Recordings, home to artists Valerie June, David Lynch, Kitty Daisy and Lewis plus a host of new signings are set for a busy 2016. A Product Manager position is available for an enthusiastic individual with a creative attitude.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
 
CMU Jobs is a proven way to recruit the best music business talent for roles across the industry at all levels, from graduate to senior management. To book an ad contact Sam on 020 7099 9060 or email ads@unlimitedmedia.co.uk
 
 
A guide to upcoming events from and involving CMU, including seminars, masterclasses and conference sessions from CMU Insights and workshops from CMU:DIY, plus other events where CMU journalists are speaking or moderating.
 
18 Jan 2016 CMU Insights Seminars: How The Music Business Works Programme
CLICK FOR INFO
18 Jan 2016 CMU Insights Seminar: Making Money From Music
CLICK FOR INFO
25 Jan 2016 CMU Insights Seminar: How Music Rights Work
CLICK FOR INFO
1 Feb 2016 CMU Insights Seminar: How Music Licensing Works
CLICK FOR INFO
8 Feb 2016 CMU Insights Seminar: The Music Rights Sector
CLICK FOR INFO
10 Feb 2016 CMU Insights Masterclass: Key Developments In Music Rights
CLICK FOR INFO
15 Feb 2016 CMU Insights Seminar: The Live Sector, Brand Partnerships & Fan Services
CLICK FOR INFO
22 Feb 2016 CMU Insights Seminar: Building A Fanbase - Social Media Tools
CLICK FOR INFO
29 Feb 2016 CMU Insights Seminar: Building A Fanbase - Music Media
CLICK FOR INFO
6 Mar 2016 CMU Insights Seminar: Building A Fan-Orientated Business
CLICK FOR INFO
6 May 2016 CMU Insights @ Canadian Music Week 2016
CLICK FOR INFO
19-20 May 2016 CMU Insights @ The Great Escape 2016
CLICK FOR INFO
 

US Copyright Royalty Board could rule on Pandora royalties today
We could find out later today what rates will be paid in the coming years to the record industry by US-based online radio services that rely on the SoundExchange licence, with America's Copyright Royalty Board due to announce the conclusion of its recent review of webcasting royalties any day now. Its deadline is actually next week, though various sources reckon an announcement could be made today.

As much previously reported, whereas AM/FM radio stations pay nothing to sound recording rights owners in the US, because of the whims of American copyright law, online and satellite radio services are obliged to pay royalties to labels and recording artists. However, a compulsory licence exists, meaning said labels and artists are obliged to license eligible services via the SoundExchange collective licensing system. The rates licensees pay are then set by the CRB.

The rates paid are particularly important because personalised radio services like Pandora qualify for a SoundExchange licence, and such services are by far the market-leading streaming platforms in the US. Therefore the monies the CRB decides Pandora-style services should pay has a big impact on the digital music market Stateside.

Pandora, of course, has gone to great effort over the years to keep its royalty bills down, by lobbying hard for the statutory rates it pays the labels to be reduced (while likewise arguing for a lower royalty obligation in the rate courts that control what it pays the music publishers via BMI and ASCAP).

This has resulted in an acrimonious relationship between the US music community and the American market's biggest digital music service. Though actually, as the latest CRB review of webcasting, which will set rates for the next five years, has been underway, Pandora has been trying to build some bridges with the labels and especially the publishers.

There are various reasons for this, including Pandora's recharged ambitions to expand into new markets where there is no equivalent of the SoundExchange compulsory license, and more recently to move into Spotify-style on-demand streaming which isn't covered by that licence even in the US.

The labels, meanwhile, reckon Pandora gets too good a deal and that the rates it enjoys skew the wider digital market. Most Pandora users are also on the free version, and the record industry, of course, wants more people to shift over to paid-subscription services which are much more lucrative. Where labels have a direct licensing relationship with digital services they can structure deals to encourage licensees to prioritise their premium services, but such flexibility is not available when licensing is done via SoundExchange.

Bigger rights owners can also usually demand a higher rate in the direct licensing domain, and for a short time it looked like the CRB might consider such a system for SoundExchange licensing too. But, as previously reported, the US Register Of Copyrights Maria A Pallante said that that idea had been introduced into the review far too late in the day, and no such system could be introduced this time round.

So everyone will get the same. But quite what rates the CRB will set remains to be seen - will the Pandoras or the labels be smiling the most? Or will the CRB pretty much keep things as they are, rendering the entire laborious review pointless? We should know pretty soon.

Elvis estate suing on digital royalties
So it turns out that even Elvis is fighting the major label system over the payment of digital royalties. A long-running royalties battle between the Elvis Presley estate and Sony Music in Germany spilled over into the New York courts earlier this week with Elvis Presley Enterprises seeking documentation as to how the major record company is exploiting the King's sound recordings catalogue around the world.

There are various elements to the royalties dispute that has been rumbling its way through the German courts for four years now, during which time it was ruled that Elvis Presley Enterprises can only dispute monies paid back to 2008. But a key part of the case is the classic royalty dispute of recent years, how the major decides what cut to pay the Presley estate on digital rather than physical income.

This comes back to the old sales v licensing debate. As with most legacy contracts, Presley's various agreements with his label in the US - now Sony Music subsidiaries - distinguished between sales and licensing income, paying a much bigger royalty on the latter than the former. But the labels have treated downloads and streams as sales, even though the record companies have 'licensing deals' with iTunes and Spotify et al.

According to The Hollywood Reporter, the Elvis Presley Enterprises lawsuit states: "It is standard practice with licensing revenues that authors and performing artists have a 50% share of the royalties earned. These [should] include revenues from digital exploitation because the defendants do not sell those files themselves rather they grant exploitation licences to third parties, for example iTunes, Amazon.de or Spotify".

The litigation also includes another common gripe of artists, the fees major record companies charge as money moves around their subsidiaries, in this case Sony's German business back to the US. Although standard practice, many artists and managers feel these fees are unfair in the digital domain, especially on catalogue content, where the extra resource provided and risk taken by the international subsidiary is minimal.

--------------------------------------------------

The Weeknd sued over alleged The Hills sample
The Weeknd has been sued by Cutting Edge Music for allegedly sampling without permission the score to the 2013 film 'The Machine', which the plaintiff controls.

The sample apparently appears on The Weeknd's track 'The Hills', the second single from the Canadian producer's 'Beauty Behind The Madness' album. It seems that Cutting Edge is only really aware of this because producer Emmanuel 'Mano' Nickerson, who also worked on the track, tweeted the composer of 'The Machine' score about it.

In legal papers filed this week, the tweet from Mano to Tom Raybould is included, and reads: "I sampled your music, might make it 2 The Weeknd next album. Huge fan of what u did 4 The Machine movie!"

But, it seems, despite Mano's excitement over sampling Raybould's score, no licensing deal was then sought by The Weeknd's label.

According to The Hollywood Reporter, the lawsuit goes on to say that both Raybould's score and The Weeknd's track "feature synthesiser bass-lines performed with almost identical idiosyncratic sounds at the same register and using the same pitch sequence, melodic phase structure and rhythmic durations".

The Weeknd, Mano and various labels and publishers are all defendants in the case.

If The Weeknd sample disputes involving 'machines' sound familiar, that's because in 2013 he was accused of using a sample of Portishead track 'Machine Gun' on his song 'Belong To The World' after permission had been denied. The claim never went legal, and The Weeknd's label Universal/Republic apparently denied that there was any sample used, with The Weeknd himself saying that he had merely been "inspired" by the Portishead track.

Spotify economics chief collates figures to estimate value of music rights in 2014: $25.28 billion
Spotify's economics man Will Page has estimated that the music rights sector was worth just over $25 billion in 2014, a figure that includes the revenues generated by songs as well as recordings.

Although the International Federation Of The Phonographic Industry puts out an annual pack of stats for the record industry, that only includes revenues generated by record companies by exploiting sound recording copyrights.

It is harder to get figures for the worldwide music publishing sector, though the annual figures from CISAC - which brings together most of the publishing sector's collecting societies - go some of the way to doing just that. But there are gaps, in particular sync deals done directly by the publishers and not reported to the collecting societies.

Even when you can fill those gaps - which Page has endeavoured to do by taking figures from song rights societies not reporting to CISAC and a report by MIDIA Consulting that referenced publishing revenues from direct rather than collective licensing - there is still one other issue to tackle.

Although the IFPI report only covers record company income, the labels collect the publisher's cut on physical music sales and some digital (mainly downloads in the US) from the retailer and then pass it on to the publishing sector - these are the 'mechanical royalties'. This money is included in both the IFPI's figures, and again in the CISAC report, so Page ensured this money was only counted once.

He ends up with a figure of $25.28 billion, of which 44.8% comes from song rights and the rest from sound recordings.

Speaking to Music Business Worldwide about this stat, Page said: "Whereas the IFPI publishes the 'Recording Industry In Numbers' [annual report], the music publishing and songwriter side of the industry has not had a similar document to serve the industry​ and its analysts​. I wanted to plug the knowledge gap, as industry analysts and professionals often don't appreciate ​the ​sheer ​value of musical works that songwriters and publishers create".

On the make up of the wider music rights sector, he added: "The David and Goliath generalisation that is often used to describe publishing and recording is misleading when you stack up the numbers, as they are actually a lot more even. For instance, some rough math shows the 2014 value of musical works - $11.3 billion - far exceeds the value of 'ownership' revenues from physical and downloads to the labels - $9.4 billion - in the same year. Go back a decade, and all we thought the industry was about was ownership - these new numbers are a sign of the times".

Live Nation sells MAMA venue in Hoxton
Mothership Group, the company behind The Book Club, Queen Of Hoxton and Stories in East London, and newish Brighton venue Patterns, has acquired the Hoxton Square Bar & Kitchen, previously operated by MAMA & Company.

Confirming the purchase, the firm's Commercial Director Jon Ross said yesterday: "We've been huge fans of the Hoxton Square Bar & Kitchen for many years. It's a great bar in a world-famous square and we're really excited about taking it on. It has an amazing history with some of the best bands on today's scene having broken there and we're looking forward to continuing and adding to that story".

Meanwhile the venue's live music programmer Adam Taylor adds: "Hoxton Square Bar & Kitchen has been at the heart of East London's music scene since it's opening in 2001 and many of the biggest and best loved bands in the world have played here early in their careers. It's exciting to be working with Mothership Group, known for their unique and innovative events, in continuing Hoxton Square Bar & Kitchen's legacy".

MAMA was acquired by Live Nation earlier this year, of course, and in October three of its bigger venues - The Forum in London, The Ritz in Manchester and The Institute in Birmingham - all basically became part of the live giant's Academy Music Group business, adding an O2 onto their names as part of AGM's portfolio-wide brand partnership.

That left the smaller venues, including the Hoxton Square Bar & Kitchen. It's thought additional deals will likely be announced for some of the other venues, while the MAMA festivals company continues to operate as a standalone entity alongside Live Nation's other UK festival businesses, including Festival Republic.

--------------------------------------------------

Adele saved fans over £4 million by blocking touts
Adele saved her fans £4.2 million thanks to her team's previously reported efforts to keep tickets for her live shows off secondary ticketing sites. As a whole, not each. This according to research by Media Insight Consulting.

Working from the official line that 18,000 "presumed touts" were removed from those signed up for access to pre-sale Adele show tickets last month, MIC reckons that action stopped around 36,000 tickets from heading straight to the secondary market. Further research by the company found that the average price fans were willing to pay per touted ticket was £181. £181 minus the actual face value equals £116. 116 multiplied by 36,000 is 4.2 million.

MIC also reckons that around 50,000 people would have been willing to pay between £750 and £1000 for a ticket, which (taking a midpoint of £875.50) would mean the singer's fanbase could have spent over £29 million extra on those 36,000 touted tickets. Which, if nothing else, shows that people are idiots and deserve everything they get. Let the secondary ticketing market run wild, I say.

Media Insight Consulting CEO Chris Carey said of the research: "Adele's '25' has been smashing sales records and there has been incredible demand for her live shows. Her music has reached the masses and it's great to see her taking steps to protect her fans. The resale of tickets has been a contentious topic in the live industry with professional touts making very large profits from an artist's biggest fans. It's fantastic to see the live industry innovating to ensure that more fans have access to affordable tickets when they first go on sale".

Yeah, that too. But mainly the idiots thing.

Clash magazine returns to print with 100th edition next year
If you hadn't noticed that the print version of Clash magazine has been hold for a year now, then don't notice. Look away! Because Clash mag is returning to print next February with its 100th edition, after which it will relaunch as a bi-monthly title.

The independent publishing firm behind Clash says it is working with a number of brand partners on the re-launch of its print edition, which will be accompanied by an app and the always-live website. The firm also has a "premium advertising partnership" with the Vice Digital Network, which aids the commercial side of the operation.

The magazine's Co-founder and Editor-In-Chief Simon Harper, says: "Reaching 100 issues in today's print climate is quite a triumph, especially for an independent publication such as Clash. We've taken time to evolve and refine the Clash brand, and are very excited about this new chapter and our visions for 2016 and beyond".

Meanwhile Devina Seth from Vice says: "Clash have quickly established themselves as a premium publisher across the Vice Digital Network. Their premium content is in demand amongst millennial audiences, which works in favour of brands and them as a media owner".

  Vigsy's Club Tip: 50Weapons Finale at Oval Space
Back in the summer, Modeselektor's 50Weapons label announced that it was winding down after ten years, having reached its target of 50 single releases. And this night pretty much cements it. The label bosses themselves will headline this grand finale party at Hackney's Oval Space and Pickle Factory.

As well as a 'secret special guest', a big draw on the line-up for me is Benjamin Damage, who had the honour earlier this year of putting out the final 50Weapons album release. He'll be putting in a live set of his techno that also draws on genres from all over dance music.

Also on the bill are Shed and Head High, Fjaak, Bambounou, Addison Groove and Phon.o. And if you're able to head down earlier, you can also attend a free event delving into the music making processes of Modeselektor, Paula Temple and Phon.o.

Saturday 12 Dec, Oval Space & The Pickle Factory, 29-32 The Oval, London E2 9DT, 10pm-8am, £25. More info here.
CLICK HERE to read and share online
 

Public Service Broadcasting to perform at London's Science Museum
Public Service Broadcasting will play a special one-off show in the Science Museum's IMAX cinema on 22 Jan. The duo will perform tracks from their latest album 'The Race For Space' to tie in with the museum's 'Cosmonauts: Birth Of The Space Age' exhibition.

"Having visited the Science Museum's excellent Cosmonauts exhibition earlier this year, we're really excited to be collaborating for what promises to be a very special evening", says PSB's J Willgoose Esq. "It should be a great event in a unique setting - we hope you can join us!"

Tickets go on sale at 1pm today, and will also get you discounted access to the exhibition.

Imagem, Ole, Harvest, more

Other notable announcements and developments today...

• Indie publisher Imagem has announced that Leo Chantzaras, previously Senior A&R Manager in the firm's German division, is now Senior International A&R Manager. He'll still work with the company's German songwriters, but he'll do lots of international things too.

• Not satisfied with that music publishing promotion? Well, try this one for size Mr Hard To Please. Canadian music publisher Ole has promoted Chris Giansante to the role of VP of Administration, he having previously been Senior Analyst in the firm's acquisitions department. Hurrah!

• Bored of music publishing? Well, how about the news that Harvest Records GMs Piero Giramonti and Jacqueline Saturn will now also be GMing the US wing of Universal's label services business Caroline? They're going to move it from New York to LA and everything.

• Bored of record labels, Harvests and Caroline? Poor Caroline, what did she ever do? Well, micro-licensing specialist CueSongs has promoted Charlotte Seibert to the role of Head Of Licensing. And about time too. She's much better at heading licensing than Caroline.

• Agents formally with faltering booking agency Elastic Artists are involved in a new company called Orchid Artist Management. It will be a booking agency at heart, but plans to play an artist development role with new talent too. Geoff Kirkwood, David Grigorian and Alberto Mombelli are all part of the business.

• Vevo now. You know Vevo, right? Well, Nic Jones has been promoted at Vevo up to the role of Chief Revenue Officer, having previously been EVP of International. He replaces Jonathan Carson.

• 2015 has been one of the most successful years in the history of Napster and Rhapsody. How do I know? A press release from Napster and Rhapsody just told me. And they're notoriously reliable. Customer base rose 45% apparently.

• Barak Obama has named Kendrick Lamar's 'How Much A Dollar Cost' as the song of the year. So I guess that's decided then.

• Those PC Music guys have collaborated with Chinese popstar Chris Lee. Hear the results here.

• Soulwax have composed the soundtrack for new Felix Van Groeningen film 'Belgica'. Watch the trailer here.

• Don't worry everybody, thanks to the unique way the BBC is funded, someone has finally celebrated Adele. And about bloody time, I say. She won two of this year's Totally Pointless Awards, while Taylor Swift, Hozier and Jack Garret won the others. How totally and utterly and completely and absolutely and fully and frankly pointless. Well done everybody.

CMU Beef Of The Week #286: Cash Money v Drake
The Grammy Awards nominations came out this week. And those who could be bothered to trawl through all 83 categories noted that there were a few omissions.

That's the way awards work, of course. Not everyone can be nominated for an award. Even at the Grammys, where it seems to have been specifically designed so that everyone gets a crack. Some people reckon Eagles frontman Don Henley and his 'Cass County' album were pretty roundly snubbed, but he's still got a nomination for Best American Roots Song.

But there was one song missing from the list in its entirety that everyone noticed: Drake's 'Hotline Bling'.

How could this be? A song that has done so well this year (and particularly in the US) that, even if you haven't actually heard the track itself, you'll almost certainly be aware of the memes drawn from its video.

Denying that there had been an intentional snub, a rep for the Recording Academy told Forbes that 'Hotline Bling' had never been submitted for consideration by its judges. This led the magazine to speculate at length that this was a strategic move by Drake.

"The fact that Drake released so much music in 2015 may actually hurt his chances at the Grammys, and that's likely the reason why he didn't even bother to submit 'Bling' for consideration", wrote Forbes contributor Hugh McIntyre. "Drake had a massive year, and Grammy voters are very aware of this, and it will be on their minds as they choose who they believe deserves the final recognition. By submitting only a few options, Drake is funneling all of his supporters to one destination: him winning another award".

It's certainly true that Drake has plenty of other Grammy nominations, despite not submitting 'Hotline Bling' - Best Rap Performance, Best Rap Song, Best Rap Album, and two nods as a featured artist on Nicki Minaj tracks - but if this was part of a strategy it doesn't seem to have entirely paid off.

Surely he would have been holding out for the Record Of The Year and Song Of The Year categories, rather than all genre specific classifications. I think Drake would probably consider himself bigger than rap now. Also, he faces some stiff competition. 2015 may have been Drake's year in the world of rap, but that's an argument he's going have to have with Kendrick Lamar (who has the President of the USA on his side, remember).

If the strategy really was to focus the voting, power ahead and win awards, a better strategy would have been to just submit 'Hotline Bling' and ignore everything else he's put out this year. Which is why an alternative explanation for its absence from the Grammy proceedings would seem a little more likely.

"Drake's massive 'Hotline Bling' was not submitted due to a clerical error on the part of label Cash Money", wrote Hits Daily Double. "That huge hit might well have been a multiple-category contender but for this goof".

I'm not sure what that clerical error would entail. "Oh, hey, I was totally going to submit our biggest track of the year to the Grammys, but then I got distracted watching Drake play tennis". To be fair, that Vine is pretty mesmerising. I just watched it about 30 times on a loop when I went to grab the link. So maybe it's excusable that the song wasn't put forward.

Although, as Fuse points out, when the deadline for submissions for the awards came round at the end of August, the track wasn't yet the all encompassing phenomenon we know today, rather it was languishing fairly low on the Billboard Hot 100, clawing its way up to number 57 a month after its release.

It wasn't until a month later that its slow rise up the chart saw it break into the top ten at number nine, rising to four the week the video was released and then peaking at number two a couple of weeks later, where it stayed for a month.

Maybe Cash Money expected the video to push the track through the roof all along, and in its excitement about what was about to happen completely forgot to sign it up for inevitable Grammy recognition. Or maybe with the track only just appearing in the charts after a month, as the Grammy deadline loomed, everyone involved was embarrassed about how it had all gone and just hoped we'd all forget it and move on.

We may never know, but in lieu of a Grammy trophy for 'Hotline Bling', I hereby present Drake with the coveted CMU Beef Of The Week commemorative dinner service. Drake will now perform a celebratory dance.

 
ANDY MALT | Editor
Andy heads up the team, overseeing the CMU bulletin and website, coordinating features and interviews, reporting on artist and business stories, and contributing to the CMU Approved column.
Email andy@unlimitedmedia.co.uk (except press releases, see below)
   
CHRIS COOKE | MD & Business Editor
Chris provides music business coverage and analysis. Chris also leads the CMU Insights training and consultancy business and education programme CMU:DIY, and heads up CMU publisher 3CM UnLimited.
Email chris@unlimitedmedia.co.uk (except press releases, see below)
   
SAM TAYLOR | Commercial Manager & Insights Associate
Sam oversees the commercial side of the CMU media, leading on sales and sponsorship, plus helps manage and deliver the CMU Insights training courses and consultancy services.
Email sam@unlimitedmedia.co.uk or call 020 7099 9060
   
CARO MOSES | Co-Publisher
Caro helps oversee the CMU media, while as a Director of 3CM UnLimited she heads up the company's other two titles ThisWeek London and ThreeWeeks Edinburgh, and supports other parts of the business.
Email caro@unlimitedmedia.co.uk
Send ALL press releases to musicnews@unlimitedmedia.co.uk - this is checked daily by the whole editorial team meaning your release will definitely get to the right person.

For details of the training and consultancy services offered by CMU Insights click here - Andy and Chris are also available to provide music business comment, just email them direct.

To promote your company or advertise jobs or services to the entire UK music industry via the CMU bulletin or website contact Sam on 020 7099 9060 or email ads@unlimitedmedia.co.uk
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