WEDNESDAY 10 FEBRUARY 2016
TODAY'S TOP STORY: The specifics have been revealed about Warner/Chappell's settlement in the long-running 'Happy Birthday' legal battle. The deal will cost the major publisher $14 million upfront, plus legal costs, and confirms that the song is now public domain in the US, meaning lost future income too. As much previously reported, Warner/Chappell bought... [READ MORE]
 
TODAY'S APPROVED: The Invisible's new single 'Save You' is very good. Let's get that information out of the way up front. I can confidently say this because I just listened to it about 20 times on repeat without meaning to. At no point did my brain kick in and start shouting, "Alright, enough now!" In fact, I'm still listening to it now. That's 21 times. Part of the reason I was listening... [READ MORE]
 
CMU PODCAST: CMU's Andy Malt and Chris Cooke review the week in music and the music business, including the SFX bankruptcy and its potential knock on effects, the RIAA adding streams into its Gold and Platinum sales awards, the PRS/PPL joint venture on performance rights licensing, and Rita Ora's legal battle with Roc Nation. The CMU Podcast is sponsored by 7digital... [LISTEN HERE]
TOP STORIES Specifics revealed about Happy Birthday settlement, will cost Warner over $30 million
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LEGAL Government clarifies tax relief for recording artists
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LABELS & PUBLISHERS Canadian company to build new, automated vinyl presses
Warner Music invests in Artist Partners Group
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ENTERTAINMENT
RETAIL
ERA says major retailers may drop music if public performance licence costs aren't reduced
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DIGITAL & D2F SERVICES SoundCloud financials confirm challenge ahead in make or break year
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ARTIST NEWS VV releases music video for Black History Month
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RELEASES That Rick Rubin-produced Star Wars-themed dance music compilation you wanted is about to come out
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ONE LINERS Kim Dotcom, Loulou Gasté, Ferdy Unger-Hamilton, more
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AND FINALLY... Ghostface Killah responds to Martin Shkreli
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Click JUMP to skip direct to a section of this email or ONLINE to read and share stories on the CMU website (JUMP option may not work in all email readers). For regular updates from Team CMU follow us on Twitter, Facebook or Tumblr.
 
 
THE ORCHARD - VIDEO SERVICES ACCOUNT MANAGER (LONDON)
We’re looking for a smart, creative and analytical forward thinker to fill a new position within our European Video Services team as Account Manager. Based in London, UK, the post-holder will help lead and develop our European video service business, executing on a value proposition that drives client satisfaction, engagement and revenue.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
BELIEVE DIGITAL - INTERNATIONAL MANAGER (LONDON)
Believe Digital is looking for an international manager to join its Label Services team in the UK. A deep knowledge of the independent music sector at international level, as well as the experience and knowledge to manage projects, is essential as Believe continues to drive its label acquisition, marketing and distribution strategy worldwide.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
TROXY - BOX OFFICE MANAGER (LONDON)
This is a fantastic role for an experienced Box Office Manager to join the team at Troxy London, a unique venue in East London. We’re looking for someone with Box Office experience, and you will come from an environment where the customer experience is key.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
WALLACE PRODUCTIONS - SENIOR MANAGEMENT ASSISTANT (LONDON)
Wallace Productions require an experienced day-to-day Artist Manager / Senior Management Assistant to join the management team. This is a wonderful opportunity for someone with 3-4 years’ experience wishing to grow and develop in a busy and internationally focused role.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
DHP FAMILY - PROMOTIONS CO-ORDINATOR (LONDON)
Building on our success DHP are looking for an enthusiastic and pro-active Marketing Co-ordinator to work with the current marketing team and deliver marketing solutions and campaigns for our London based business.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
BUCKS MUSIC GROUP - PAID INTERNSHIP (LONDON)
Mute Song is seeking a dynamic individual to join the company as Music Publishing Assistant. This position presents a terrific opportunity for a bright and engaging person to embark on a rewarding career in music publishing.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
MUTE SONG - MUSIC PUBLISHING ASSISTANT (LONDON)
Mute Song is seeking a dynamic individual to join the company as Music Publishing Assistant. This position presents a terrific opportunity for a bright and engaging person to embark on a rewarding career in music publishing.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
BEGGARS MUSIC - COPYRIGHT AND ROYALTIES ANALYST (LONDON)
Beggars Music are looking to hire an experienced Copyright and Royalties Analyst, based in their London office. The role would be best suited to someone with experience of either working within music publishing administration or a collection society.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
LISTEN UP - PRESS MANAGER (LONDON)
We are hiring an experienced Press Manager to join the press team at Listen Up. The candidate will need 2-4 years' experience experience in a similar role with a thorough knowledge of artist and label campaigns. We are looking for an enthusiastic and articulate individual with strong writing and organisational skills.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
AEG LIVE - TICKETING ASSISTANT (LONDON)
We are now hiring a Ticketing Assistant to join our team. The successful candidate will support the day to day operations of the ticketing team for events within AEG Live & Goldenvoice.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
YOUR ARMY - MUSIC EVENTS AND PRESS OFFICER (LONDON)
Your Army is seeking a dynamic Music Events And Press Officer to join its expanding and busy Press Department and Promotions Team. The successful candidate will have a minimum of 2-3 years experience working across national music events and festivals alongside an adept understanding of both new and established artist campaigns.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
FMLY - BOOKING AGENT (BRIGHTON)
FMLY London is a booking agency based in Brighton and we are looking to expand our team and currently have an opening for an established booking agent.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
SECRET ROAD - MUSIC LICENSING CREATIVE (LONDON)
Secret Road Music Services, Inc is a boutique music services company based in Los Angeles, California that focuses on music licensing, music publishing and artist management. We are seeking a Music Licensing Creative to join our London team working out of offices in Kings Cross.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
CIRCUS RECORDS - PART-TIME PAID INTERNSHIP (LONDON)
Electronic record label seeking a pro-active, knowledgable intern for 20 hours per week to help out in all departments including label management, social media, press and merchandise. Main responsibilities will include, but are not limited to assisting the label team with DJ and club promotion, press, social media and other more general label activities.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
ATTITUDE IS EVERYTHING - COMMUNICATIONS ASSISTANT (LONDON)
In April 2016 we’ll be launching an Artist Engagement project to help us elicit support for our campaigns from prominent musicians. Esmée Fairbairn have awarded us funding to build on the success of our #MusicWithoutBarriers and Club Attitude campaigns. We are seeking a part-time Communications Assistant to work with us for two years.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
ATTITUDE IS EVERYTHING - ARTIST ENGAGEMENT AND COMMUNITY CO-ORDINATOR (LONDON)
In April 2016 we’ll be launching an Artist Engagement project to help us elicit support for our campaigns from prominent musicians. Esmée Fairbairn have awarded us funding to build on the success of our #MusicWithoutBarriers and Club Attitude campaigns. We are seeking a freelance Artist Engagement And Community Co-ordinator to work with us for two years.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
CREAM - SOCIAL MEDIA & DIGITAL EXECUTIVE (LIVERPOOL)
Do you live and breathe social media? Have a passion for electronic music and festivals? Have a flair for design? Work well as part of a team? Enjoy working in a fast paced commercial environment? Then this could be the perfect job for you. Rare opportunity to join the Cream marketing team based in our new Liverpool offices.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
 
CMU Jobs is a proven way to recruit the best music business talent for roles across the industry at all levels, from graduate to senior management. To book an ad contact Sam on 020 7099 9060 or email ads@unlimitedmedia.co.uk
 
 
A guide to upcoming events from and involving CMU, including seminars, masterclasses and conference sessions from CMU Insights and workshops from CMU:DIY, plus other events where CMU journalists are speaking or moderating.
 
10 Feb 2016 CMU Insights Masterclass: Key Developments In Music Rights
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15 Feb 2016 CMU Insights Seminar: The Live Sector, Brand Partnerships & Fan Services
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17 Feb 2016 CMU:DIY x Urban Development Industry Takeover Seminar
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18 Feb 2016 CMU Insights @ Output 2016
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22 Feb 2016 CMU Insights Seminar: Building A Fanbase - Social Media Tools
CLICK FOR INFO
29 Feb 2016 CMU Insights Seminar: Building A Fanbase - Music Media
CLICK FOR INFO
6 Mar 2016 CMU Insights Seminar: Building A Fan-Orientated Business
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16 Mar 2016 CMU:DIY x Urban Development Industry Takeover Seminar
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17 Mar 2016 CMU Insights @ Convergence 2016
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13 Apr 2016 CMU:DIY x Urban Development Industry Takeover Seminar
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14 Apr 2016 CMU Insights @ Music 4.5: Playlists 2
CLICK FOR INFO
18 Apr 2016 CMU Insights Masterclass: Music Business Explained - For Brands
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6 May 2016 CMU Insights @ Canadian Music Week 2016
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19-20 May 2016 CMU Insights @ The Great Escape 2016
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Specifics revealed about Happy Birthday settlement, it will cost Warner over $30 million
The specifics have been revealed about Warner/Chappell's settlement in the long-running 'Happy Birthday' legal battle. The deal will cost the major publisher $14 million upfront, plus legal costs, and confirms that the song is now public domain in the US, meaning lost future income too.

As much previously reported, Warner/Chappell bought the company which it believed owned the copyright in the famous song back in the 1980s. That company was Summy & Co, which had bought the rights in 'Happy Birthday' from its creators, the Hill sisters, in the early part of the 20th century. But which copyrights had it bought, exactly? That was the question at the heart of this case.

There were various strands to the legal battle that ensued after a film company sued the Warner publisher claiming that 'Happy Birthday' was 'public domain' in the US - ie the copyright had expired, and therefore the music rights firm shouldn't have been insisting on royalties from those who used the song.

Confusion around the copyright status of 'Happy Birthday' arose because, in the US, the song was subject to copyright term rules from a hundred years ago, before the life-plus-70-years system was in place. It was agreed that this meant the music was out of copyright in America, but the 'Happy Birthday' lyrics came later (they not being the original words), and Warner/Chappell insisted that they remained in copyright.

In their lawsuit, the plaintiffs argued three things: that the Hill sisters, who had written the original words, which went "good morning to you", didn't pen the more famous lyrics; or if they did they at some point abandoned the copyright in them; or if they didn't, they never transferred ownership of those specific words to Summy & Co.

It was on that last point that a judge ruled in favour of the plaintiffs last September, meaning that while the copyright status of the song remained uncertain, Warner/Chappell did not own the lyrics. The publisher initially said it would appeal the ruling, but then in December it was announced that a deal had been reached.

Details of that settlement have now been confirmed, with Warner/Chappell set to pay out $14 million to those who have paid to licence the song in the US in the past. An additional $4.6 million will be paid to cover legal costs, and beyond all that, by accepting that the song is now public domain, Warner/Chappell is probably giving up another $14 million+ in future royalties, because by its maths the song would have remained in copyright Stateside until 2030.

For the publisher, the settlement - which still needs to be approved by the judge - means that the matter won't now go to trial, where plaintiffs would likely have argued that the company should be punished for collecting royalties on a public domain song for decades.

In Europe, where the life-plus-70-years system does apply, the song will go public domain on 1 Jan next year. In the meantime, it's not clear who owns the lyrics, given that the ruling that they were never assigned to Summy, though Warner/Chappell may well claim that it still owns the music, which is still in copyright over here.

Government clarifies tax relief for recording artists
The British government has confirmed that a tax relief which allows creators to average their income over two consecutive years can be applied to recording artists paid advances by record labels. UK Music and the Featured Artists Coalition sought the clarification on exactly if and when the relief applied to musicians.

This relief was introduced in 2001, recognising that authors and artists often have one very profitable year followed by one that is less so. Where profits are "wholly or mainly derived from literary, dramatic, musical or artistic works or designs" it is possible to average the profits for successive tax years. This reduces the burden of the more profitable year, and can in some circumstances drop one year's tax bill into a lower band, meaning less tax is due.

UK Music and the FAC asked for clarification on whether recording artists who receive an advance from a label are covered by the system, because the rule is slightly ambiguous saying that "profits must come from royalties or disposal of the works rather than from the provision of services".

In a letter responding to both organisations, Financial Secretary to the Treasury David Gauke MP said: "I am happy to confirm that the advance of royalties are within the scope of the averaging rules for creators of literary or artistic work. The advance of royalties is exactly the sort of situation these provisions are intended to address for creative artists such as recording artists".

Responding, FAC Chair Sandie Shaw said in a statement: "Recording artists are prone to fluctuating finances. A very good year can then often be followed by one which isn't so profitable. I am delighted that there is a mechanism in place which can allow Featured Artists Coalition members to not be disadvantaged by the tax system and one that respects the nature of our creative endeavours".

While UK Music CEO Jo Dipple added: "I am pleased that government has clarified that recording artists must be treated by HMRC the same way as other creators with regards the averaging of profits over successive tax years. I encourage eligible artists to make full use of this clarification".

Canadian company to build new, automated vinyl presses
This vinyl revival's all well and good, but back when we all decided the format was dead everyone smashed their vinyl pressing machines into little bits and now there are only seven left. True story. Also, those machines are all dead old and slow, which is why the indies get annoyed when the majors block book every one to press their 7000 Record Store Day releases each spring. But there may be a glimmer of hope on the horizon.

Canadian company Viryl Technology has announced the launch of a brand new vinyl pressing machine that is not only quite shiny, but also faster than the clunky things everyone's currently using. "The idea is to help the industry get rid of its own bottlenecks", Viryl CEO Chad Brown told The Globe & Mail. "[And] we're in this to stay. We're not gonna go away after a year".

Why so defensive, Chad? Well, perhaps because this isn't the first time he's got into the vinyl pressing game. Back in 2003 he bought what was then Canada's last factory, Acme Pressing, and ran it for four years before shutting it down. To be fair, that was before the vinyl revival happened.

Viryl is not the only new player entering the vinyl pressing market - Jack White, for one, is setting up his own pressing plant in Detroit. But, says Brown, everyone else is using old manual machines or what are effectively clones of those old machines. This one he's built is automated, so doesn't rely so much on crappy humans.

Once fully up and running, Brown reckons Viryl will be able to build two new presses per week, so get your orders in now, kids.

--------------------------------------------------

Warner Music invests in Artist Partners Group
The super NICE Warner Music Group has invested in the Artist Partners Group, the company set up in 2013 by its President of A&R Mike Caren.

The Warner investment aims to help the company... well, keep on doing what it's doing, mainly. Under the deal, Caren also becomes Creative Officer at WMG, a newly created role, as well as promoting himself to APG's CEO.

The major label already had a relationship with Artists Partners, which is a sister company to Caren's older Artist Publishing Group, and which offers a variety of label services to artists, producers and entrepreneurs. Both APGs will now move to a newly set up recording facility and office space in LA.

In his role at WMG, Caren will advise the label's global A&R team, as well as continuing to sign and develop new and established talent across the major's labels. He's also working on the soundtrack to new comic book movie 'Suicide Squad'. Sounds busy, huh? I didn't even mention that he's a songwriter too. Where will he find the time?

Artist Partners releases will continue to be pushed out through Atlantic Records, following on from recent successes with the likes of Kevin Gates and the unequivocally awful Charlie Puth.

"Great artists and young executives have never been so dynamic, informed, and driven", said Caren. "Our goal is to amplify and execute their ideas without being beholden to any traditional industry rules. I like to think of Artists Partners as an indie major label that offers its talent the resources of a major with an independent's entrepreneurial spirit and urge for experimentation".

You can think what you like, mate. Here's what Atlantic CEO Craig Kallman and COO Julie Greenwald apparently thought simultaneously in both their minds: "Since joining the Atlantic family 20 years ago, Mike has consistently stayed ahead of the curve. His A&R instincts are exceptional, and he has signed an amazing roster of artists across a range of genres - recruiting groundbreaking talent and delivering a stream of hit records".

They continued thinking: "Alongside his A&R chops, he is a gifted producer and songwriter, and also spearheaded the development of our recording studio operations in LA. His vision for Artist Partners is perfectly aligned with the future path of Atlantic and WMG - to foster creativity, excellence, and original thinking. We are THRILLED to extend and expand our relationship with Mike and his great team".

Normally I'd say something here about the thrilling word in that last sentence. But I got distracted by them mentioning "chops". I don't know about you, but I think I've just decided what I'm having for dinner.

ERA says major retailers may drop music if public performance licence costs aren't reduced
The Entertainment Retailers Association has raised concerns that rising public performance licence costs are hindering the businesses that are trying to help the music industry sell more of its music, to the extent that non-specialists might withdraw from selling records completely.

These concerns are being raised now, because the retailers are particularly annoyed that the previously reported incoming joint PPL/PRS licence, which will make public performance licensing more efficient in the UK, will not pass cost savings on to the licensees.

Record shops, like most other places of business, require licences from collecting societies PPL and PRS For Music to play music over a stereo system. This has always been a bone of contention for music sellers because, unlike most other places of business, they are playing music in an attempt to sell it.

"This is very different, for instance, to commercial radio stations who play music to sell advertising or bars who play music to sell alcohol", says ERA in a blog post. "Music retailers use music predominantly to sell music. And naturally any sales they generate typically benefit rights owners far more than they do the retailer".

It continues: "Many ERA members have reported [public performance] fees which have risen at more than double the rate of inflation over the past decade. The level of licence fees charged to the bigger chains and supermarkets in particular seem excessive, and in many cases these fees can completely wipe out any retail profit on music sales".

The trade body says that hopes were raised by the news of the new joint licence that there would be some reduction in costs. "Unfortunately not", continues the statement. "A PRS and PPL spokesman was swift to quash any such suggestion. Any cost savings we must assume therefore will be kept by the PRS and PPL".

"Which rather cuts to the heart of the whole issue", it adds. "In competitive markets, when cost savings become available they are invariably passed on to consumers (ERA members do it all the time). But PRS and PPL do not of course operate in competitive markets. They are effectively monopolies".

"It would be a shame if the announcement of what by any measure is a progressive move - the coming together of PRS and PPL to bring new efficiency to public performance licensing - were to become a catalyst for some major retailers to give up on music entirely", it threatens in conclusion.

Responding to ERA's blog post, a spokesperson for PRS For Music and PPL told CMU: "It was always our intention for the proposed joint venture that, by creating a single point of contact for our UK public performance customers, it would allow us to significantly simplify music licensing for UK businesses. It is in our licensees' interests to ensure that our licensing is ever more efficient but, importantly, it is also in our respective members' best interests as well without whose work and creativity, there is no music at all".

SoundCloud financials confirm challenge ahead in make or break year
I think it's reasonable to say that 2016 is something of a make or break year for SoundCloud, without being accused of ramping up the drama in this here opening paragraph in the vague hope it will encourage you to read on.

The digital firm has been "pivoting" its business - as start-up types like to say - for at least two years now, trying to launch both an advertising set-up and a subscription service around its existing platform, which boasts a significant content library and user-based.

This pivoting is all about finding new revenue streams, partly to placate investors who need to see more income than the 'pay-us-some-money-to-host-more-content' model can generate, and partly to placate the music industry, which recognises the marketing value of the SoundCloud platform, but which needs it to start paying royalties. Particularly as the industry at large shifts from sales to consumption, ie streaming is the business, rather than just a way to drive physical or download sales.

Though, of course, it took the best part of those two years to persuade the music industry that the new ad platform and subscription service was something it should participate in, partly because of frustration among rightsholders over just how big SoundCloud had grown without ever getting any music licences (it citing 'safe harbours', of course). And while the majority of labels and increasingly the publishers are now getting on board, Sony Music is still a hold-out.

Most of the deals are now in place to try to make this work. And it needs to work. As the firm's most recently filing with Companies House in the UK confirms. The filing relates to 2014, and confirms that SoundCloud's losses rose that year, with an overall loss of 39 million euros on revenues of 17 million euros.

In the new report, SoundCloud's auditor KPMG confirms that additional funding is now required to keep the business operating, a fact that, the accountants said, constituted "a material uncertainty which may cast significant doubt on the company's ability to continue as a going concern". But the digital firm says it is confident that the required financing will be secured.

The company got its hands on $77 million more in financing last year, including the previously reported credit facility worth over $30 million provided by Tennenbaum Capital Partners. And boss man Alexander Ljung says investors remain supportive because "we're one of the biggest music platforms in the world and we're growing fast".

The company expects to continue to be loss-making for at least the next three years, which in itself won't necessarily affect investor support, though the firm's backers will need to see the new revenue streams gain some momentum in that time. That's no small task. The labels remain critical of the ad revenues YouTube generates, and that's with the weight of the Google ad-selling machine. In the subscription space SoundCloud faces some significant and well-funded competitors too.

However, Ljung does have a head start in terms of numbers of free subscribers, and some labels and artists continue to use his platform as the launchpad for brand new music, which gives the site an edge content-wise. Whether that is enough to make SoundCloud a viable business long-term, very much remains to be seen.

  Approved: The Invisible
The Invisible's new single 'Save You' is very good. Let's get that information out of the way up front. I can confidently say this because I just listened to it about 20 times on repeat without meaning to. At no point did my brain kick in and start shouting, "Alright, enough now!" In fact, I'm still listening to it now. That's 21 times.

Part of the reason I was listening for so long was because I was looking through the CVs of the band's three members. Their musical activities outside The Invisible stretch a long way. Which might explain why it's been almost three years since their last album.

You might think that band members spreading themselves so thin would have a detrimental effect on the music they make together. Nope. 'Easy Now', released last summer, was a good opportunity to dip your toes back into their sound, and now 'Save You' is a chance to slip right into it.

Apparently the actual release date of their third album is a closely guarded secret. But don't sit around presuming that means they've not actually finished it yet, just listen to 'Save You' on repeat until it finally arrives.

Stay up to date with all of the artists featured in the CMU Approved column in 2016 by subscribing to our Spotify playlist.
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VV releases music video for Black History Month
VV has released a new video for 'Sacrifice', taken from her 2015 album 'Glitch', to coincide with Black History Month.

The video shows the musician transformed into a white woman, using prosthetics and make up. In an article for the Guardian, she writes: "It represents a dual consciousness: a strange pendulum between wearing a mask and showing your true identity ... As a black person you almost automatically learn to use this mask in order to survive in a society predominantly catering to a white audience".

"It shows in different forms - from extremes of self-hate, where all things black are rejected, to coping strategies such as not wearing braids to a job interview in fear of being deemed 'too ethnic'", she continues. "These compromising adaptation strategies help us feel included, avoiding the fear that if one was to show blackness in its entirety there will be alienation and confusion from one's counterparts".

Read the full article here, and watch the video here.

VV will perform a one-off show in London at a secret location on 26 Mar. Tickets are available here.

That Rick Rubin-produced Star Wars-themed dance music compilation you wanted is about to come out
Disney is releasing a 'Star Wars'-themed dance music compilation produced by Rick Rubin, with various producers creating tracks using sounds from the film franchise. Because... well because Disney reckons it'll make money. Even George Lucas never had this idea, and that's why he's now living in a ditch. By which I mean, he's incredibly wealthy but never made a dance music album with a 'Star Wars' theme, produced by Rick Rubin or otherwise. Unless he did. Did he? I don't think he did.

Among the artists contributing to the record are A-Trak, Baauer, Flying Lotus, Kaskade, Bonobo, Breakbot, Royksopp, Rustie, Shlohmo and Rubin himself. It's called 'Star Wars Headspace'. Yeah? Well, you think of a better title if you think you're so clever.

It'll be out digitally on 19 Feb, then physically on 18 Mar. You can see artwork and listen to some tracks at www.starwarsheadspace.com

If you want me to now reassure you that it's all going to be OK, the titles on this tracklist aren't going to help at all:

1. Kaskade - C-3P0's Plight
2. GTA - Help Me! GTA
3. TroyBoi - Force
4. Baauer - Cantina Boys
5. Shag Kava - Jabba Flow (Rick Rubin Re-Work feat A-Trak)
6. Claude VonStroke - R2 Knows (feat Barry Drift)
7. Rick Rubin - NR-G7
8. Bonobo - Ghomrassen
9. Röyksopp - Bounty Hunters
10. Attlas - Sunset Over Manaan
11. Flying Lotus - R2 Where R U?
12. Shlohmo Druid Caravan Of Smoke
13. Rustie - Ewok Pumpp
14. Galantis - Scruffy-Looking Nerfherder
15. Breakbot - Star Tripper

Kim Dotcom, Loulou Gasté, Ferdy Unger-Hamilton, more

Other notable announcements and developments today...

• MegaUpload founder Kim Dotcom's appeal against his extradition to the US, where he faces charges of money laundering, racketeering and copyright infringement, won't kick off until 29 Aug. The US government had been pushing for the appeal to be fast-tracked, hoping that Dotcom will lose and it can get him into an American courtroom ASAP.

• BMG has acquired the publishing catalogues of French songwriter Loulou Gasté from his widow, singer and actress Line Renaud. "All my trust goes to BMG France and BMG Global so that the work of my husband will never be forgotten", says Renaud. No pressure.

• Polydor Records President Ferdy Unger-Hamilton is leaving the Universal label, with Hits Daily Double reckoning he's set to launch a new joint venture label with Sony Music. And who wouldn't want to launch a new joint venture label with Sony Music? Can I have a new joint venture label with Sony Music? I'd call it THRILLED Records.

• Universal Music Australia has launched one of those creative agencies that delivers "entertainment-led marketing partnerships and talent-led solutions". It's a joint venture with PR company One Green Bean, that is majority owned by Havas, which has a shareholder in common with Universal owner Vivendi: Vincent Bollore. Universal France has a joint venture with another Havas firm, and Universal UK's Global often works with Havas agency Cake.

• Kali Uchis and Slow Hollow's Austin Feinstein feature in this new Tyler, The Creator video. Because they feature on the song too. It's obvious really.

• Shonen Knife have put out a track from their upcoming 35th anniversary album 'Adventure', which is out on 1 Apr. Here's 'Jump In To A New World'. And remind yourself of their UK tour dates here.

• Nisennenmondai will release a new album, '#N/A', on 1 Apr. It's produced by Adrian Sherwood, whose influence is strong enough that the title actually stands for 'Nisennenmondai/Adrian Sherwood'. Here's a track called '#3'.

• Petite Noir has announced that he will release a new single, 'Just Breathe', on 26 Mar. He'll also play The Laundry in London on 3 Mar. Here's a video of him performing another song, 'MDR'.

• Laura Mvula will play Islington Assembly Hall on 22 Mar. Here's recent single 'Overcome', featuring that Nile Rodgers.

Ghostface Killah responds to Martin Shkreli
It's taken a couple of weeks, but Ghostface Killah has finally responded to Martin Shkreli's video demanding an apology for insulting him. Spoiler: He didn't apologise. Actually, part of the delay seems to have been finding someone to Photoshop Shkreli's head onto Pee-wee Herman's body.

The video sees the rapper describe Shkreli as "the man with the twelve year old body" and describes their fight as "Ghost versus Peter Pan". He also responds to Shrkeli's claims that his "goons" are harder than the Wu-Tang members by bringing out his mother and sister to back him up.

Ghostface Killah spends the bulk of the video calling on Shkreli to drop the price of the drug Daraprim back down to the rate it was sold at prior to his company buying the rights to the medication and increasing the price per pill by 5000%. The clip also acts as an advert for the rapper's own branded cannabidiol product, about which he makes some fairly dubious medical claims.

Watch the whole video here.

Elsewhere in the 'how-did-this-fucker-become-music-news?' file, Shkreli is being sued by a man who claims that the one-off-copy Wu-Tang album that the controversial pharma exec bought for $2 million - the purchase of which led to the Ghostface Killah feud - uses unauthorised artwork.

According to Reuters, plaintiff "Jason Koza said he never allowed his fan art depicting Wu-Tang members to be used in packaging for the hip hop group's 'Once Upon a Time in Shaolin'". This is Shkreli's problem, says Koza, because he 'displayed' the artwork without permission to an online magazine, which then published it.

Which I'm not sure is really what the public display right under US law (an equivalent of the public performance right, but for artwork) is intended for, but hey, any excuse to slap that Shkreli in the face I suppose.

 
ANDY MALT | Editor
Andy heads up the team, overseeing the CMU bulletins and website, coordinating features and interviews, reporting on artist and business stories, and contributing to the CMU Approved column.
Email andy@unlimitedmedia.co.uk (except press releases, see below)
   
CHRIS COOKE | MD & Business Editor
Chris provides music business coverage and analysis. Chris also leads the CMU Insights training and consultancy business and education programme CMU:DIY, and heads up CMU publisher 3CM UnLimited.
Email chris@unlimitedmedia.co.uk (except press releases, see below)
   
SAM TAYLOR | Commercial Manager & Insights Associate
Sam oversees the commercial side of the CMU media, leading on sales and sponsorship, and advising on CMU Insights training courses and events.
Email sam@unlimitedmedia.co.uk or call 020 7099 9060
   
CARO MOSES | Co-Publisher
Caro helps oversee the CMU media, while as a Director of 3CM UnLimited she heads up the company's other two titles ThisWeek London and ThreeWeeks Edinburgh, and supports other parts of the business.
Email caro@unlimitedmedia.co.uk
Send ALL press releases to musicnews@unlimitedmedia.co.uk - this is checked daily by the whole editorial team meaning your release will definitely get to the right person.

For details of the training and consultancy services offered by CMU Insights click here - Andy and Chris are also available to provide music business comment, just email them direct.

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