FRIDAY 13 MAY 2016
TODAY'S TOP STORY: Sweden's Court Of Apple has upheld an earlier ruling that says the country's domain registry should hand over The Pirate Bay's .se domains to the state. Those of you who pay attention to these things may remember that this has been a long drawn out saga. The team behind the Bay expected to lose their flagship thepiratebay.se domain ages ago, which was one... [READ MORE]
 
TODAY'S APPROVED: 2016 marks the 35th anniversary of the death of Bob Marley, and tonight Brixton Jamm gets into tribute mode with a night headlined by Congo Natty. Promising "conscious vibes with a renegade sentiment", Marley's heritage and influence will be explored through roots, reggae and jungle. As well as the performance from Congo Natty, the line-up features Iron Dread... [READ MORE]
 
BEEF OF THE WEEK: Rob Zombie met Babymetal at the weekend. You may already know this, because he posted a picture of himself with the Japanese trio to his Facebook page. Then a load of old men decided that this was a thing that should not have happened. Despite them having the word 'metal' in their name, various men deemed that Baby Metal were in no way metal. Reasons for this included them... [READ MORE]
TOP STORIES Swedish appeals court says Pirate Bay domains should be seized
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DEALS Canadian collecting society acquires music-data-rich MediaNet
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LABELS & PUBLISHERS ASCAP settles with Department Of Justice over exclusivity terms
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LIVE BUSINESS Mumford & Sons manager comments on secondary ticketing petition
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DIGITAL & D2F SERVICES CMU@CMW: Direct to fan comes of age
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MEDIA UK Music welcomes protections for music in BBC white paper
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ARTIST NEWS No more Coldplay albums, sorry
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RELEASES New Metronomy album on the way, but no touring
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ONE LINERS Music + Sport, BPI, Azealia Banks, more
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AND FINALLY... CMU Beef Of The Week #305: Rob Zombie v Babymetal Haters
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Click JUMP to skip direct to a section of this email or ONLINE to read and share stories on the CMU website (JUMP option may not work in all email readers). For regular updates from Team CMU follow us on Twitter, Facebook or Tumblr.
 
 
INGROOVES MUSIC GROUP - INTERNATIONAL DIGITAL ACCOUNT MANAGER (LONDON)
The position of International Digital Account Manager is responsible for the development and growth of key accounts in the digital music industry outside of North America. You will work closely with label representatives to ensure maximum visibility for our key projects and manage relationships with external accounts and internal teams at INgrooves.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
PRS FOR MUSIC - HEAD OF BROADCAST LICENSING (LONDON)
The Head of Broadcast Licensing will lead the Broadcast Licensing function within PRS for Music, managing negotiations with the largest broadcast customers. They will develop and drive the licensing teams to ensure PRS for Music is maximising revenues and increasing licence penetration whilst delivering excellent customer service.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
MINDS ON FIRE - PUBLISHING ASSISTANT (LONDON)
Minds On Fire, a dynamic music publishing company, is looking for an assistant to work across all aspects of the company. Reporting to the two directors, the role will involve managing the extensive works database, song registration, liaising with sub publishers, updating the website / social media platforms and assisting with synchronisation.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
ROCKET PR - NATIONAL RADIO PLUGGER (LONDON)
Rocket PR have an exciting opportunity for a national radio plugger to join their successful team. Rocket is one of the UK's leading radio and TV promotions companies, working with top independent labels and both emerging and established artists.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
MINISTRY OF SOUND - LICENSING EXECUTIVE (LONDON)
Ministry Of Sound requires a Licensing Executive to license and clear tracks (both third party and our own tracks) for our compilations within the required deadline, and looking after all the administration in respect of those albums.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
VEVO - SOCIAL MEDIA MANAGER (LONDON)
Vevo, the world's leading platform for music entertainment, is in search of a Social Media Manager to join us in our exciting Editorial department. You’ll be joining one of the leading online music platforms that receives over seventeen billion monthly views and you could be at the forefront of driving our brand.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
NETTWERK MUSIC GROUP - PROMOTION MANAGER (LONDON)
The Promotion Manager’s role is to co-ordinate, arrange, manage and support the promotion of artists being released by Nettwerk UK, wherein one or more aspects of the promotions are not being handled by external third parties.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
SNAPPER MUSIC - MARKETING AND ROYALTIES ASSISTANT (GRADUATE LEVEL) (LONDON)
UK independent label Snapper Music seeks a graduate looking for experience in the music industry in a role to include sales, marketing and royalty accounting duties. A great opportunity for an entry level position in our central London office.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
AEI MEDIA - MUSIC PUBLICIST (LONDON)
An exciting opportunity has arisen for a talented and passionate music publicist to work in-house at AEI Media across our variety of global music brands and artists. We are looking for an independent, well-rounded individual with a strong creative streak and passion for electronic music, a nose for a unique story and a strong contact base.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
[PIAS] ARTIST & LABEL SERVICES - LABEL MANAGER (LONDON)
[PIAS] Artist & Label Services is looking for a new Label Manager to join the team. The successful candidate will have the proven experience and understanding of sales, marketing and distribution necessary to navigate the challenges of the modern music business, allied to a sound grasp of both physical and digital routes to market.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
EGG LONDON - DIGITAL MARKETING MANAGER (LONDON)
Egg London is one of London's most established clubbing venues. We are currently looking for a Digital Marketing Manager to join our team in the Egg London office.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
OUTPOST MEDIA - SUPERSTAR PR ACCOUNT MANAGER (LONDON)
Fast growing music PR agency is looking for a sharp Account Manager who loves PR and takes pride in doing a superstar job. You will require an encyclopedic music knowledge, a passion for clubs and gigs and be obsessed with popular youth culture.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
LISTEN UP - SENIOR PRESS MANAGER (LONDON)
Listen Up provides a bespoke 360 promotional service offering radio, club, online and print campaigns in the UK and worldwide, consistently delivering results to clients in a diverse range of musical genres.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
 
CMU Jobs is a proven way to recruit the best music business talent for roles across the industry at all levels, from graduate to senior management. To book an ad contact Sam on 020 7099 9060 or email ads@unlimitedmedia.co.uk
 
 
A guide to upcoming events from and involving CMU, including seminars, masterclasses and conference sessions from CMU Insights and workshops from CMU:DIY, plus other events where CMU journalists are speaking or moderating.
 
19-20 May 2016 CMU Insights @ The Great Escape 2016
CLICK FOR INFO
21 May 2016 CMU:DIY x The Great Escape 2016
CLICK FOR INFO
kicks off 6 Jun 2016 CMU Insights Seminars Programme: How The Music Business Works
CLICK FOR INFO
6 Jun 2016 CMU Insights Seminar: Making Money From Music
CLICK FOR INFO
13 Jun 2016 CMU Insights Seminar: How Music Rights Work
CLICK FOR INFO
15 Jun 2016 CMU Masterclass: Music Business Explained - For Brands
CLICK FOR INFO
20 Jun 2016 CMU Insights Seminar: How Music Licensing Works
CLICK FOR INFO
27 Jun 2016 CMU Insights Seminar: The Music Rights Sector
CLICK FOR INFO
4 Jul 2016 CMU Insights Seminar: Merch, Live & Brands
CLICK FOR INFO
6 Jul 2016 CMU Masterclass: Navigating The Digital Market
CLICK FOR INFO
11 Jul 2016 CMU Insights Seminar: Building A Fanbase - Social Media Tools
CLICK FOR INFO
18 Jul 2016 CMU Insights Seminar: Building A Fanbase - Music Media
CLICK FOR INFO
25 Jul 2016 CMU Insights Seminar: Building A Fan-Orientated Business
CLICK FOR INFO
 

Swedish appeals court says Pirate Bay domains should be seized
Sweden's Court Of Apple has upheld an earlier ruling that says the country's domain registry should hand over The Pirate Bay's .se domains to the state.

Those of you who pay attention to these things may remember that this has been a long drawn out saga. The team behind the Bay expected to lose their flagship thepiratebay.se domain ages ago, which was one of the reasons why they started announcing alternatives, beginning a race around the world as rights owners pressured different registries in different countries to suspend any domain that contained the words pirate or bay.

Ironically the entertainment industry had much more success getting thepiratebay domains blocked in pretty much every country other than Sweden, where domain registry Punkt SE said that domain seizures were a matter for the courts.

Swedish prosecutor Fredrik Ingblad has been leading the legal battle to get thepiratebay.se suspended, and scored a win in the courts just under a year ago, with judges saying that the legendary piracy site's domains should indeed be handed over to the state, so that officials could post a "hey, you, stop nicking our stuff" message at the famous URL. Or something similar. In Swedish probably.

But there were complications. Ingblad wanted to hold Punkt SE responsible for the copyright infringement conducted at thepiratebay.se. But the courts were having none of that, and actually ordered the prosecutor's office to pay the domain registry's legal fees. Meanwhile Pirate Bay founder Fredrik Neij was named as the current owner of the domain, but he insisted that he no longer has anything whatsoever to do with The Pirate Bay, him having been jailed for his past involvement in the site and all that.

Which is how the whole matter ended up in the Court Of Appeal, meaning thepiratebay.se continued to tick along nicely as a working domain. Yesterday the appeals court basically endorsed the earlier ruling, that the Bay's domains should be seized, but that Punkt SE ain't liable, and Fredrik Neij is a naughty boy for owning a domain used by a piracy site.

You have to think that Ingblad's office would now accept this ruling, even if it means paying Punkt SE's fees, because it would end the long drawn out legal proceedings, and let his office finally seize the domains. Though, according to Torrentfreak, Neij remains annoyed that his name is still included in this litigation, because he is not involved in the Bay and, he says, no longer has any control over the site's domains.

Neij told Torrentfreak that he intends to further appeal the latest ruling, saying: "I will appeal on the grounds that I do not own the domain and that I did not commit copyright infringement as I am not involved with the site anymore". All of which could mean yet more legal wranglings, enabling the Bay to continue using its primary domain for some time yet.

Canadian collecting society acquires music-data-rich MediaNet
So you all remember MediaNet right? You old timers still insist on calling it MusicNet, I know. But MediaNet was one of the original white-label digital music platforms that powered an assortment of download and streaming services for tech, retail and music companies. Well, it's been bought by Canadian performing rights organisation SOCAN.

"Why the hell would SOCAN do that?" you're almost certainly now shouting at your screen. Are you now shouting that at your screen? Well you all should. Loudly. Enunciate it clearly. That would be fun. The answer, in case you wondered, is "data, baby". Now wipe the spit off your screen and I'll explain why.

Good music rights data - and the lack thereof - has been a big talking point of late, of course, and various people have noted that some of the best music databases have been complied by the likes of MediaNet - and the currently in administration Omnifone - initially as a by-product of operating white-label download and streaming services.

Says SOCAN of its purchase of MediaNet and all that data: "With MediaNet, SOCAN will be able to identify digital performances from around the world in real-time, with access to granular performance data to make better decisions, identify trends and increase revenue for members. This comes with a level of data accuracy and transparency that few, if any, music rights organisations in the world can provide".

Want to now more? Well, "With more than 51 million sound recordings in its database, each containing a unique audio identifier, MediaNet will provide SOCAN with authoritative information pertaining to master rights (sound recordings), and will augment already strong matching capabilities for all kinds of performances and reproductions of music on radio, digital, live, satellite, film and TV and other delivery of music to public audiences".

Confirming the purchase, SOCAN chief Eric Baptiste told reporters: "The music ecosystem is in need of data and accuracy and, with MediaNet, SOCAN is the first major music collective to meet this need. The expanded family of MediaNet and SOCAN creates an unbeatable combination that will help drive proper compensation for SOCAN's membership base of songwriters, composers and music publishers and potentially for all parties involved in the music value chain".

Says MediaNet chief Frank Johnson, who will continue to run the operation: "SOCAN is a leader in ushering the transition from physical to digital through a commitment to data and artist advocacy. We are THRILLED to join the SOCAN family and realise our shared goal of pioneering high-scale technology solutions that ensure fair and accurate royalty administration".

It's an interesting and possibly wise acquisition for both parties - with opportunities in the white label digital music platform space on the wane, and demands on collecting societies to get much better at data at an all time high. Perhaps UK society PRS and it's buddies in the ICE joint venture could buy Omnifone's data out of administration?

ASCAP settles with Department Of Justice over exclusivity terms
Your good mates over at ASCAP yesterday announced that the American performing rights organisation had reached a settlement with the US Department Of Justice over two concerns raised by the government agency regarding practices at the society. The settlement will see ASCAP make two changes to its operations and pay a fine of $1.75 million. So the drinks are on the DoJ.

Government officials claimed that ASCAP had violated the rules of the consent decree that governs the organisation by entering into exclusivity deals with about 150 of its members. In most other countries, when songwriters and publishers join a performing rights society, they give that organisation the exclusive right to represent the performing right elements of their copyrights.

In the US, where competition law struggles with the concept of collective licensing, the norm is that the PRO represents its members performing rights on a non-exclusive basis, meaning a licensee can circumvent the society and try to do a deal directly with a songwriter and/or publisher, if they so wish.

The DoJ said that ASCAP had added exclusivity terms to some of its deals with members since 2008, and that this contravened consent decree rules. "By blocking members' ability to license their songs themselves, ASCAP undermined a critical protection of competition contained in the consent decree", said the DoJ's Renata B Hesse.

The society insisted that it had never enforced any exclusivity provisions in its members contracts, adding that they had now been removed and would not be included in future agreements. Despite its change in policy and paying the significant fine, ASCAP has not admitted to any wrongdoing as part of the settlement. So, that's alright then.

The DoJ's other concern was about the potential conflict of interest caused by the publishers who sit on the society's board, who may be doing their own licensing deals with streaming companies and such like. Under the settlement, ASCAP is allowed to keep its current board structure - twelve songwriters and twelve publishers - but publisher board members will not participate in the approval of new licensing agreements.

Confirming the settlement, ASCAP CEO Elizabeth Matthews said: "Settling this matter was the right thing to do for our members. With these issues resolved, we continue our focus on leading the way towards a more efficient, effective and transparent music licensing system and advocating for key reforms to the laws that govern music creator compensation".

ASCAP, of course, like its rival BMI, wants the aforementioned consent decrees rewritten to overcome various issues that have occurred since the rise of digital. In particular, giving publishers the right to pull their digital rights while continuing to license radio and other public performance via the collective licensing system, something which has basically happened with Anglo-American repertoire in Europe.

Mumford & Sons manager comments on secondary ticketing petition
Mumford & Sons manager Adam Tudhope has commented on the positive response he has received to that petition he recently launched calling on the government to introduce tighter restrictions on the secondary ticketing market.

As previously reported, the petition says that the Consumer Rights Act has proven ineffectual in restricting the secondary market to date and calls for the introduction of a previously proposed amendment to the Act, which was rejected by Parliament last year, that would place tighter controls on secondary ticketing websites.

Having quickly gained the 10,000 signatures required to gain a response from the government, Tudhope puts the success of the campaign down to the rebelliousness of the UK population.

"Luckily for us we live in a wonderful country that loves to rebel, to take the path least trod", he tells IQ. "We're often the innovators - especially in music and in the music business, we're always ahead of the curve. British people love music, they love disruption, and they'll knock the establishment if it needs knocking. And then often others around the world will follow our lead".

Adding that he is not against tickets being resold at face value, he adds: "Fans have to be able to re-sell their tickets if they can't go, but stopping people being able to profit from that reselling would stop touting dead in its tracks".

The resellers and secondary ticketing platforms, of course, say that ticket resales for profit are part of an open and fair market, and that the existence of secondary sites based within the UK jurisdiction creates a safer place for buyers. If it weren't for them, say the resellers, dodgy sites based abroad would be ripping people off left, right and centre.

When Parliament first rejected the Consumer Rights Act amendments Tudhope is now asking MPs to reconsider, MD of the resale division of Live Nation's Ticketmaster Christoph Homann said: "We believe it is important that the industry continues to ensure that consumers are protected, have clear information about the purchases they are making and that fraud is prevented. We are in active dialogue with the government about how the industry can do yet more to improve its high standards even further".

CMU@CMW: Direct to fan comes of age
Artists are now beginning to see the potential of operating a good direct-to-fan business, says Music Glue's Mark Meharry. But there is still much more to be done in changing perceptions.

"Over a five year period, having direct access to a fan - an email address - is worth on average $75", Meharry told CMU Business Editor Chris Cooke in an interview during CMU Insights @ Canadian Music Week last week. "You start multiplying that up, it becomes very lucrative".

Fans want to buy things from artists they like, he added, but by fragmenting how they offer direct sales - by linking to one service for merch, another for records, and another for tickets - artists are often missing out. "If you are selling tickets, the products you sell alongside them can be worth $30 per person", he said. "If you sell tickets through your website, you could be making an additional £60,000 from secondary products".

"We're not trying to disrupt the industry", he added. "We're providing another route. The best person to sell is the artist - nothing else compares. We have bands who are so successful in D2C that they have their own fulfilment centres in the UK. Enter Shikari are a prime example. They built a warehouse, and it's now so successful that it sends out merch globally for Metallica, Rage Against The Machine and Red Hot Chili Peppers".

The growth of the direct-to-fan industry has moved slower than many expected, given the obvious opportunities for D2C sales provided by the web and now mobile. This is largely a technological issue, says Meharry.

"To create a service where fans come to you as an artist, to buy tickets to your shows, to buy merchandise, digital content or even just experiences; to create a platform where managers can do this without any help, and to do this globally in any language, that is difficult", he explained. "We all thought ten years ago that this was going to be such an obvious thing and easy to implement. Five years in we [realised that wasn't going to be the case]. But ten years on, we've more or less got there [in terms of the technology challenges], and now we're seeing a shift".

That shift being a cultural thing, ie changing a mindset in the industry. "There's a cultural shift that needs to happen now", Meharry continued. "The technology had to come first, now it's mindset. I'm sure I'll still be doing conferences for the next ten years advocating that cultural shift. We just need to educate people. It's going to be tough, but it's going to happen".

Look out for further reports from CMU Insights @ Canadian Music Week next week.

UK Music welcomes protections for music in BBC white paper
Cross-sector trade group UK Music yesterday welcomed the white paper on the BBC put together by the government's Culture Secretary John Whittingdale, claiming victory for its campaign to protect the broadcaster's music output.

The trade body launched its #LetItBeeb campaign last year due to fears that government forced changes to BBC funding due to come into effect when the Corporation's licence-fee-enabling Royal Charter is renewed, might result in a cutback of the broadcaster's music services. This would be a disaster, said UK Music and numerous musicians and music industry people, because no other broadcaster does so much to support homegrown musical talent.

Whittingdale's white paper was published yesterday, ahead of a debate and final decision on the BBC's future funding due to take place in the autumn. It notes that BBC radio services are "quite clearly distinct from commercial competitors", although does not accept the BBC's own figures on overlap between its stations and rival commercial services. The Corporation insists there isn't much overlap, but the white paper says Radio 1 and 2 could show "even greater levels of ambition ... while still remaining channels of broad public appeal".

"The BBC Charter renewal process must never facilitate a reduction in the breadth of musical choice for listeners", says UK Music in a statement. "Substantive changes to the way the BBC will operate in the future, and the way it is governed, must not be allowed to open the door to partial decision-making on music programming. UK Music stands by its demand for more, not less music on the BBC. Indeed, the Secretary of State agreed with this aspiration".

The organisation adds that it will continue to lobby to ensure the necessary safeguards are in place to protect music at the BBC, before the Royal Charter is finalised.

UK Music CEO Jo Dipple says: "Collectively Radio 1, 1Xtra, Radio 2, Radio 3, 6Music, Asian Network, Proms, BBC Introducing, Glastonbury festival coverage, five orchestras, BBC Singers, new music commissions, music broadcast programming and music documentaries give fans and listeners access to the most astounding and diverse range of musical content. BBC Music caters for a myriad of tastes which are not served by the commercial sector".

"Without BBC Music services to support the development of new music, our industry would not only be poorer and listeners deprived, but this country would find it harder to outperform on the world stage", she continues. "UK Music will be assessing the full implications of this historic white paper with its members and we look forward to discussing it with the BBC, government and Parliament in the coming weeks and months".

Other elements of the white paper - especially over BBC governance - have proven more controversial, and will likely dominate the debates between now and the Royal Charter being fully agreed.

  Vigsy's Club Tip: A Tribute To Bob Marley at Brixton Jamm
2016 marks the 35th anniversary of the death of Bob Marley, and tonight Brixton Jamm gets into tribute mode with a night headlined by Congo Natty. Promising "conscious vibes with a renegade sentiment", Marley's heritage and influence will be explored through roots, reggae and jungle.

As well as the performance from Congo Natty, the line-up features Iron Dread, Congo Dubz, Laid Blak, Klashnekoff, Footsie, Jamie Rodigan and King Original Sound System. Newly refurbished with more space inside and out, as well as a brand new sound system, this is a great opportunity to check out the all new Jamm.

Friday 13 May, Brixton Jamm, 261 Brixton Rd, London, SW9 6LH, 10pm-5am, £15. More info here.
CLICK HERE to read and share online
 

No more Coldplay albums, sorry
Chris Martin would be "surprised if there was another conventional Coldplay album". Which is the sort of thing people sometimes say after they've released a new album, before later getting that urge to get back into the studio and put down another ten tracker, but Martin seems quite adamant.

Speaking to Zane Lowe on Beats 1, Martin said: "I'd be surprised if there was another conventional Coldplay album. I just feel like we're right where we're supposed to be right now. I meant what I said to you a couple of years ago, I feel like this is a closing chapter of something. I stand by that I'm afraid".

"I don't think we'd split up as a band so hopefully we'll try to work out something to do at some point", he continued. "But also part of me right now just feels like, yeah, seven albums, that's great. They form a kind of circle and they all make sense to me now. I feel really proud of them".

Seven Coldplay albums does seem like quite a lot, doesn't it?

New Metronomy album on the way, but no touring
Metronomy have announced that they will release a new album on 1 Jul. It's called 'Summer 08' and it's got Mixmaster Mike and Robyn on it.

The album is an attempt to get back to the simplicity of Joe Mount's breakthrough album with the project, 'Nights Out', which was released at the end of the summer of 2008. "I had those other albums - and how I wanted to record in bigger studios - out of my system", he explains. "I wanted to make another record with the naivety of 'Nights Out': ten tracks, straight up, upbeat. Write another banger, then another, and don't really think about it".

The first track from it, 'Old Skool', doesn't sound massively upbeat lyrically though: "I was living in East London in 2008 and felt like all this stuff was happening in the West End. It's nonsense really, but I felt it was this privileged end of town, all the musicians there had wealthy parents and were living in Ladbroke Grove and Notting Hill. So that song's about being totally idiotic and just jealous".

You can listen to it here, but don't get too excited about seeing it performed live. "I want to have a break from touring but I don't want a break from putting out music", he says.

Music + Sport, BPI, Azealia Banks, more

Other notable announcements and developments today...

• Music + Sport, which likes putting on concerts at racecourses, is now putting on concerts at rugby stadiums. Who'd have thought it possible? Jess Glynn will play Gloucester Kingsholm Stadium on 18 Jun.

• Record label trade group BPI's AGM and (late) summer reception will take place on 7 Sep at London's County Hall, and if anyone dares say that I didn't tell them, there'll be trouble with a capital T. Yep, I'm going to relaunch the long defunct youth TV station.

• Following a series of tweets directing racist and homophobic language towards Zayn Malik earlier this week, Azealia Banks has had her Twitter account suspended.

• Muse have released the video for their new single 'Aftermath'.

• She Makes War, aka Laura Kidd, releases her new single, 'Cold Shoulder', today. The release coincides with UK tour dates, which find her and her band in Manchester at the Fallow Café tonight.

• Rebekah Delgado will perform live at St Pancras Old Church in London on 1 Jun, showcasing new material and recording a live EP. Tickets here. And speaking of new material, here's 'Sins Of The Father'.

CMU Beef Of The Week #305: Rob Zombie v Babymetal Haters
Rob Zombie met Babymetal at the weekend. You may already know this, because he posted a picture of himself with the Japanese trio to his Facebook page. Then a load of old men decided that this was a thing that should not have happened.

Despite them having the word 'metal' in their name, various men deemed that Baby Metal were in no way metal. Reasons for this included them being "lame", "awful" and "a shameful embarrassment to anything metal". But they do have 'metal' in their name, so you're kind of stuck there. Next you'll be telling me Rob Zombie isn't an actual zombie.

Oh yeah, speaking of Rob Zombie, he did not agree with any of these accusations. "They roll harder than you", he told one commenter. "These three girls had more energy than 90% of the bands we play with", he told another. They are still teenagers though, so that's probably to be expected.

To a man who said that seeing Zombie with Babymetal made him want to cry, and that their music made him want to kill things, the former White Zombie frontman delivered his choicest comeback: "They are nice kids out on the road touring. What are you doing besides being a grumpy old fuck?"

What indeed. Maybe we will never know. Commenting on the meeting themselves, Babymetal said: "Thank you Rob! The spirit of HEAVY METAL traversed across the world, rose above language barriers, went beyond generations and created countless legends".

I'm not 100% sure what that means, but it sounds good. The trio are aware that they're not to everyone's taste though, something they discussed in a new interview with Noisey.

"People are free to think whatever they think", said Su-metal. "We are very aware that there are people that do not agree with what we do or do not think that what we do is metal". She added that having people around who don't like them is "part of the learning process" and that "every one person who is interested in Babymetal's music is enough" anyway.

On their contribution to the metal scene in general, Moametal said that they now see "a lot of younger kids" coming to their shows and hope "to introduce younger people or people our age to metal". So that's the next generation of metal fans sorted, all of whom will probably grow up to make and enjoy music that old men think is shit. Which is as it should be. Long may it continue.

 
ANDY MALT | Editor
Andy heads up the team, overseeing the CMU bulletins and website, coordinating features and interviews, reporting on artist and business stories, and contributing to the CMU Approved column.
Email andy@unlimitedmedia.co.uk (except press releases, see below)
   
CHRIS COOKE | MD & Business Editor
Chris provides music business coverage and analysis. Chris also leads the CMU Insights training and consultancy business and education programme CMU:DIY, and heads up CMU publisher 3CM UnLimited.
Email chris@unlimitedmedia.co.uk (except press releases, see below)
   
SAM TAYLOR | Commercial Manager & Insights Associate
Sam oversees the commercial side of the CMU media, leading on sales and sponsorship, and advising on CMU Insights training courses and events.
Email sam@unlimitedmedia.co.uk or call 020 7099 9060
   
CARO MOSES | Co-Publisher
Caro helps oversee the CMU media, while as a Director of 3CM UnLimited she heads up the company's other two titles ThisWeek London and ThreeWeeks Edinburgh, and supports other parts of the business.
Email caro@unlimitedmedia.co.uk
Send ALL press releases to musicnews@unlimitedmedia.co.uk - this is checked daily by the whole editorial team meaning your release will definitely get to the right person.

For details of the training and consultancy services offered by CMU Insights click here - Andy and Chris are also available to provide music business comment, just email them direct.

To promote your company or advertise jobs or services to the entire UK music industry via the CMU bulletin or website contact Sam on 020 7099 9060 or email ads@unlimitedmedia.co.uk
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