FRIDAY 17 JUNE 2016
TODAY'S TOP STORY: ATP's live music business has gone into administration and is to shut down, bringing to an end a long series of financial troubles for the tour and festival promoter, best known for its All Tomorrow's Parties events. This means that the upcoming ATP Iceland festival, due to take place at the beginning of July, has now been cancelled. All other upcoming... [READ MORE]
 
TODAY'S APPROVED: Red Bull Culture Clash returns to London tonight with a huge line-up at The O2 in Greenwich. Four sound systems - each representing different styles - pull out the stops bringing fresh dubs and special guests to woo the crowds. Artists involved include: Wiley, leading the grime-orientated Eskimo Dance sound system; Mixpak, who'll be bringing along Jamaican... [READ MORE]
 
BEEF OF THE WEEK: Yes, I told you this would happen, and it has. In fact, it's been quite a busy week for pop-related EU referendum news. Something I'm sure you're as pleased about as I am. First up, it's our old friend Bpoplive, which is due to take place this Sunday. Or it was. It's not now, because it's been cancelled. But before you start assuming that this was because the line-up... [READ MORE]
 
CMU PODCAST: CMU's Andy Malt and Chris Cooke review the week in music and the music business, including all the goings on at the Led Zeppelin song-theft court case, Apple Music's big revamp announcement at Worldwide Developers Conference, Foo Fighters' insurance litigation and some pop-related EU referendum news. The CMU Podcast is sponsored by 7digital. [READ MORE]
TOP STORIES ATP goes into administration, Iceland festival cancelled
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LEGAL Appeals court says safe harbours do apply to pre-1972 recordings in US
Cliff Richard to face no charges over accusations of sexual assault
Finnish court orders Pirate Bay founder to pay damages to labels
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LABELS & PUBLISHERS Merlin members see streaming revenues boom
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DIGITAL & D2F SERVICES British people increasingly turning to subscription services, research finds
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ARTIST NEWS Grimes comments on Barclays Center walk off
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GIGS & FESTIVALS Arab Strap reunite for 20th anniversary shows
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ONE LINERS The Vaccines, Opeth, In Flames, more
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AND FINALLY... CMU Beef Of The Week #310: Pop v Brexit (Round 5)
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Click JUMP to skip direct to a section of this email or ONLINE to read and share stories on the CMU website (JUMP option may not work in all email readers). For regular updates from Team CMU follow us on Twitter, Facebook or Tumblr.
 
 
RESIDENT ADVISOR - AD OPERATIONS EXECUTIVE (BERLIN)
RA seeks an ambitious and detail-oriented ad-operations executive with a passion for music. Taking ownership of RA’s ad operations you will be responsible for trafficking online creative, campaign management, tracking, optimising and reporting for all client digital advertising on Resident Advisor.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
PROPER MUSIC - E-COMMERCE CO-ORDINATOR (LONDON)
The E-commerce Co-ordinator will support the E-commerce Manager with all administration and operational processes required for Propermusic.com (PMC) to run effectively and efficiently. The successful candidate will be overseeing and managing the processing, picking, packing and despatching of all orders for PMC and other fulfilment services we offer to our clients.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
PURPLE PR - ENTERTAINMENT PUBLICIST (LONDON)
Purple, who look after publicity for a roster of high profile international and domestic clients including Adele, Beyonce, Grimes, Pusha T, Major Lazer, Lewis Hamilton and Zayn are seeking an Entertainment Publicist.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
BILLS PR - FREELANCE PUBLICIST (LONDON)
Bills PR has a position available for a Freelance Publicist to work across a range of clients and projects. The candidate should have at least two years music PR experience, covering both print and online.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
HART MEDIA - RADIO PROMOTIONS ASSISTANT (LONDON)
Hart Media is one of the UK’s leading Radio PR agencies. Our clients have included Joss Stone, Ward Thomas, Passenger, The Prodigy, Public Service Broadcasting, Sophie Ellis Bextor, Motorhead, Deaf Havana, Madness, Alison Moyet to name a few.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
FABRIC RECORDS / HOUNDSTOOTH - FABRICFIRST SECRETARY (LONDON)
The position involves managing the day-to-day running of the Fabric membership club, comprising electronic music lovers from around the World. The role is a mix of customer care through email, social media and telephone channels, database management, stock dispatching and control, and assisting on both fabric and Houndstooth record labels.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
FABRIC RECORDS / HOUNDSTOOTH - ASSISTANT ACCOUNTANT (LONDON)
Fabric Records / Houndstooth are looking for an Assistant Accountant to work alongside their MD, ensuring the smooth running of day to day finance operations. This is a great opportunity to develop your existing skills in a social, fast paced team within the much sought-after music industry.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
THE BREWHOUSE - EVENTS & LIVE MUSIC MANAGER (LONDON)
The Brewhouse at London Fields Brewery is one of East London’s most exciting event spaces. As the Events and Live Music Manager, you will be responsible for the booking, programming and promotion of our live music and club nights.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
PROPER MUSIC - NATIONAL ACCOUNT MANAGER (LONDON)
Proper Music Distribution is now the largest truly independent, full service distributor of music on all formats in the UK. Reporting directly to the Head of Sales, the National Account Manager’s role is to develop strong direct relationships with key domestic retail partners. Customers include HMV, Fopp, Amazon and supermarkets.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
PROPER MUSIC - ROYALTIES ACCOUNTANT (LONDON)
Proper Music Distribution is now the largest truly independent, full service distributor of music on all formats in the UK. The Royalty Accountant role exists to make sure that the companies’ contractual royalty obligations are interpreted accurately and on time.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
 
CMU Jobs is a proven way to recruit the best music business talent for roles across the industry at all levels, from graduate to senior management. To book an ad contact Sam on 020 7099 9060 or email ads@unlimitedmedia.co.uk
 
 
A guide to upcoming events from and involving CMU, including seminars, masterclasses and conference sessions from CMU Insights and workshops from CMU:DIY, plus other events where CMU journalists are speaking or moderating.
 
20 Jun 2016 CMU Insights Seminar: How Music Licensing Works
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27 Jun 2016 CMU Insights Seminar: The Music Rights Sector
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4 Jul 2016 CMU Insights Seminar: Merch, Live & Brands
CLICK FOR INFO
6 Jul 2016 CMU Masterclass: Navigating The Digital Market
CLICK FOR INFO
11 Jul 2016 CMU Insights Seminar: Building A Fanbase - Social Media Tools
CLICK FOR INFO
18 Jul 2016 CMU Insights Seminar: Building A Fanbase - Music Media
CLICK FOR INFO
25 Jul 2016 CMU Insights Seminar: Building A Fan-Orientated Business
CLICK FOR INFO
 

ATP goes into administration, Iceland festival cancelled
ATP's live music business has gone into administration and is to shut down, bringing to an end a long series of financial troubles for the tour and festival promoter, best known for its All Tomorrow's Parties events. This means that the upcoming ATP Iceland festival, due to take place at the beginning of July, has now been cancelled. All other upcoming ATP promoted live shows will go ahead as planned but with alternative promoters, says the company.

In a statement yesterday, the company said: "It is with deep sadness we are announcing that ATP festivals and live promotions are closing down. After months of speculation, our funding for Iceland has been pulled and we are no longer able to continue, so will be closing down the entire live side of ATP festivals and live promotions with immediate effect and going into administration".

This is not the first time financial problems have driven the ATP company into administration. However, when it happened in 2012 the firm's upcoming tours and festivals went ahead, transferred to a new company set up by founder Barry Hogan. Its festivals continued to be hit by financial problems though, often resulting in last minute cancellations - most notably 2014's Jabberwocky festival in London, which was pulled with just three days' notice.

The latest round of troubles began in March, when the ATP company was unable to meet its financial commitments to holiday camp operator Pontins, which was hosting two planned UK festivals. The first of these, curated by comedian Stewart Lee, did go ahead. However, the second, curated by Drive Like Jehu, was first moved to Manchester and then cancelled with less than a week to go.

When this happened, ATP insisted that its Icelandic event was safe, as it was run by a separate company. However, in the weeks running up to the festival Múm and Blanck Mass announced that they were pulling out, followed by Fabio Frizzi this week - a spokesperson for whom said that this was due to a "lack of communication and the failure to honour any of the agreements".

A representative for one other artist on the bill also confirmed to CMU that they had withdrawn from the event but not publicly announced this fact, which rumours that others had also done the same. With only 26 acts listed on the event's website, and day tickets not yet on sale, it increasingly looked like ATP Iceland may not go ahead.

"ATP Iceland festival is no longer happening", the company confirmed in its statement yesterday. "But all our other UK shows will have new promoters appointed and tickets transferred (all purchased tickets remain valid with the new promoter). We will post details of the administrators and what to do for festival ticket refunds over the next week".

It concluded: "We are very sorry we could not make this work and have tried to survive throughout all our recent losses but we are no longer able to trade and have to accept we cannot go on. Thank you to all our loyal customers who have supported us and incredible artists who have performed or curated for us over the years and made ATP so special while it lasted".

ATP's recordings and music publishing businesses are operated by a separate company and are believed to be unaffected by the live division's administration.

Appeals court says safe harbours do apply to pre-1972 recordings in US
If you think it's bizarre that in America those safe harbours everyone loves so much might not apply to sound recordings released before 1972, in doing so providing record labels with a sneaky way of suing platforms which rely on the harbours to avoid liability for copyright infringement, well, you should get yourself a job in the Second Circuit appeals court. Because judges in that US court have ruled that the safe harbours should apply to all and any sound recordings protected by copyright Stateside.

As much previously reported, US-wide federal copyright law only applies to sound recordings released after 1972. Earlier sound recordings rely on state-level copyright law for protection. This has led to much chatter as to whether certain specific elements of federal copyright law could or should still apply to sound recordings that pre-date 1972.

In more recent years, this debate has centred on whether the obligation for online and satellite radio services like Pandora and Sirius XM to pay royalties to labels for the recordings they use should apply to golden oldies, because that obligation comes from federal law (which also says AM/FM stations do not have to pay).

Though, in its fight to force Pandora et al to pay up when streaming 1950s and 1960s repertoire, the record industry has generally argued that the obligation to pay royalties can be found in state-level copyright law as well as federal statute, even though state-level rules are usually a bit vague on this point. But in the main, that argument has found favour in court, especially in California and New York.

One of the reasons the labels fought Pandora with this argument - rather than just saying the obligation to pay royalties in federal law should be applied to all copyright protected recordings - was because they were concurrently arguing that the safe harbours in the US-wide Digital Millennium Copyright Act should not apply to pre-1972 tracks.

That argument was being used in cases against digital platforms that were hosting, in one way or another, sound recordings without licence, but which were claiming safe harbour protection. Labels felt some services - the now defunct Grooveshark in particular - were misusing the safe harbours to build music platforms without getting any licences from the labels.

But, with some courts having already set the obligations of safe harbour dwellers pretty low, there was a fear that if the record companies sued the likes of Grooveshark for straight copyright infringement they'd successfully defend themselves on safe harbour grounds, setting a dangerous precedent. Therefore they looked for alternative approaches, including suing over the streaming of pre-1972 tracks, on the basis that the safe harbours of federal law didn't apply with recordings protected by state law.

Another big case where that argument was put forward by the record industry was a wide-ranging copyright suit against video sharing site Vimeo which, unlike big bad YouTube, has no significant licensing deals in place with the music industry. In litigation led by then EMI label Capitol, Vimeo in the main prevailed, though the judge at first instance in 2013 sided with the record company on the pre-1972 point.

Appeal judges do not concur, saying that safe harbours not applying to pre-1972 recordings would "defeat the very purpose Congress sought to achieve in passing the statute", according to Law 360. "Service providers would be compelled either to incur heavy costs of monitoring every posting to be sure it did not contain infringing pre-1972 recordings, or incurring potentially crushing liabilities under state copyright laws".

"It is not as if pre-1972 sound recordings were sufficiently outdated as to render the potential liabilities insignificant", judges added. "Some of the most popular recorded music of all time was recorded before 1972, including work of The Beatles, The Supremes, Elvis Presley, Aretha Franklin, Barbra Streisand and Marvin Gaye".

So good news everybody - those safe harbours you all hate now definitely apply to the entire sound recording repertoire in the US. Though fans of common sense might nevertheless welcome this ruling.

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Cliff Richard to face no charges over accusations of sexual assault
Cliff Richard will face no further action over allegations of historic child abuse, the Crown Prosecution Service announced yesterday, saying that there was "insufficient evidence to prosecute".

As previously reported, Richard's Berkshire home was searched by police in 2014, in relation to allegations that he sexually assaulted a boy under the age of sixteen at a Christian faith rally in 1985. The singer, who no longer lives in the UK, was in Portugal at the time of the search, and said that the accusations were "completely false". He flew back to the UK days later to be questioned by police. He was never arrested and no charges were made.

Police dropped one investigation into the abuse claims last September, but re-interviewed Richard in November.

Referencing the fact that BBC cameras were controversially on site to film the arrival of police at his Berkshire home two years ago, the singer said in a statement yesterday: "Ever since the highly-publicised and BBC filmed raid on my home I have chosen not to speak publicly. Even though I was under pressure to 'speak out', other than to state my innocence, which was easy for me to do as I have never molested anyone in my life, I chose to remain silent. This was despite the widely shared sense of injustice resulting from the high profile fumbling of my case from day one".

He continued: "Other than in exceptional cases, people who are facing allegations should never be named publicly until charged. I was named before I was even interviewed and for me that was like being hung out like 'live bait'. It is obvious that such strategies simply increase the risk of attracting spurious claims which not only tie up police resources and waste public funds, but they forever tarnish the reputations of innocent people. There have been numerous occasions in recent years where this has occurred, and I feel very strongly that no innocent person should be treated in this way".

"I know the truth and in some peoples' eyes the CPS's announcement today doesn't go far enough because it doesn't expressly state that I am innocent; which of course I am", he added. "There lies the problem. My reputation will not be fully vindicated because the CPS's policy is to only say something general about there being 'insufficient' evidence. How can there be evidence for something that never took place! This is also a reason why people should never be named publicly until they have been charged unless there are exceptional circumstances".

--------------------------------------------------

Finnish court orders Pirate Bay founder to pay damages to labels
A Finnish court has ordered Pirate Bay co-founder Peter Sunde to pay over 350,000 euros in damages to the local divisions of Sony Music, Universal Music, Warner Music and good old EMI, in relation to accusations that he was involved in sharing music by 60 Finnish artists on the file-sharing platform. Yeah, good luck with collecting that loot.

Sunde said on Twitter that he was unaware of the case, and had only found out about it when he read that he had lost in the media. "The record companies know that I have not had any part of TPB for ages, still suing", he added. "Bullying is the new black".

According to DigiToday, Sunde faces a further one million euro fine if the content is not taken down, despite him having no involvement in the service anymore, and he must pay a further 55,000 euros to record industry trade group the IFPI. The 350,892 euro damages will also accrue interest until paid.

Sunde, of course, received a criminal conviction for his involvement with the always controversial piracy service in 2009, and eventually served jail time for it in 2014 after exhausting all routes of appeal. Though damages awarded to the entertainment industry in the same case were never paid.

Merlin members see streaming revenues boom
Merlin's 700 odd indie label members are seeing increasing financial benefits from streaming, says the digital rights agency's annual survey. The organisation's CEO Charles Caldas revealed the results yesterday at US indie label trade body A2IM's AGM.

In the year up to March 2016, Merlin members have seen streaming revenues increase by 73% year-on-year to $232 million. 46% of the labels surveyed said that streaming and subscription services were now their primary source of income, up from around a third last year. Meanwhile, 62% said that digital overall accounts for more than 50% of their business, and for a third of respondents it is over 75%.

Digital is also giving greater access to international markets as well, with 38% saying that more than 50% of their digital revenues come from outside their home territory, compared to 16% for physical. All of which accounts for 65% of members saying that their businesses grew in the last year, and 79% saying that they are optimistic about the future.

But don't go thinking these results were all chirpy and happy. Just 28% said that downloads were their primary income stream now, down from 41% in the 2015 survey, showing the steepness of the decline of that format. And would it be a music industry statement without a bit of a YouTube kicking? No, it would not. 64% of respondents said that video streaming platforms accounted for less than 10% of digital revenues, which Merlin says shows that video platforms are "falling short of potential".

The research also found that usage of Merlin members' music on audio streaming services is 27% higher on paid tiers compared to ad-funded, with freemium and premium set-ups together accounting for 11.5 billion streams.

Caldas said of the results: "2016's survey offers yet more evidence that Merlin's independent record label members continue to grow and break new ground in the digital space. Over successive years we have seen audio streaming revenues surge for the vast majority, and it is particularly heartening to see members capitalise on consumer demand in new or previously untapped international markets. The digital business is a global business, and Merlin members are at the heart of it".

This is all well and good, of course, but the streaming services themselves all remain loss-making enterprises. As revenues from these companies become more and more important to the labels, the need to push them into profit grows greater.

Merlin's report follows the publication of research carried out by the Worldwide Independent Network, showing that independent labels represent a much higher share of the recorded music market than is generally reported in official industry figures.

British people increasingly turning to subscription services, research finds
New research has found that 78% of adults in the UK are now signed up to at least one subscription service online - though that's covering everything from music and video to food and financial services.

Carried out by YouGov for e-commerce firm Zuora, the research reckons that 13.9 million people in the UK are now signed up to video-on-demand services. In music, it estimates that 5.9 million are signed up to Spotify in one way or another (which sounds a little low), and 2.9 million are currently hooked into Apple Music (which sounds a little high).

In total, it says that 21% of 16-24 are signed up to music services. The three most common reasons given for signing up to video and audio streaming platforms are convenience, not having to buy things, and discovery.

The research also lists reasons that put people off signing up to subscription services of all types. These include worries that it will be difficult to unsubscribe, that there will be price increases, that there is a lack of transparency around subscription deals, and that they will lose track of all the services they are signed up to. People also said that they don't like being limited to certain products within a subscription.

"The broader message from these survey results", concludes the report, "is that standalone products are simply no longer sufficient. We increasingly view owning something as simply managing the decline of a physical asset".

Find the full report here.

  Vigsy's Club Tip: Red Bull Culture Clash at The O2
Red Bull Culture Clash returns to London tonight with a huge line-up at The O2 in Greenwich. Four sound systems - each representing different styles - pull out the stops bringing fresh dubs and special guests to woo the crowds.

Artists involved include: Wiley, leading the grime-orientated Eskimo Dance sound system; Mixpak, who'll be bringing along Jamaican dancehall star Popcaan for a debut UK performance; rapper Wiz Khalifa and Taylor Gang, plus the newly-formed UKG All Stars, comprised of So Solid Crew, DJ Luck & MC Neat, Oxide & Neutrino and others.

Annie Mac will be hosting proceedings... should be a biggun!.

Friday 17 Jun, The O2, Peninsula Square, London, SE10 0DX, 5pm-11pm, £20-45. More info here.
CLICK HERE to read and share online
 

Grimes comments on Barclays Center walk off
Grimes has commented on reports that she walked off stage mid-way through a set at the Barclays Center in Brooklyn, where she was supporting Florence And The Machine on Wednesday night.

According to Pitchfork, the musician halted her set part way through a performance of her song 'World Princess Part II', having told the audience while introducing the song: "We just had a really disturbing thing happen to us today, so sorry if my voice is shaking, it's just kind of a fucked day" adding that she was "having a little trouble keeping it together".

Tweeting about the incident, she said last night: "I will explain what happened at Barclays once I can safely and legally do so".

She added: "In the meantime 'someone from Reddit' or fan accounts are not credible sources. Speculating about my mental health is not news. Thanks".

Grimes is due to play dates in the UK next week around her Glastonbury appearance on Sunday 26 Jun.

Arab Strap reunite for 20th anniversary shows
Aidan Moffat and Malcolm Middleton have reformed Arab Strab to play three shows marking their 20th anniversary. They've also released a new version of their debut single 'The First Big Weekend', retitled 'The First Big Weekend Of 2016'.

"I think the day we went to the pub and split up, we made a joke about Arab Strap getting back together in ten years' time to celebrate", Middleton told Steve Lamacq on 6 Music. "So that's basically what this is: a chance to enjoy the music we made once more".

Of the re-recorded single, Moffat added: "It's probably how it should have sounded the first time. We knew we couldn't really do much to the song because the story has to stay intact, and by extension the arrangement, but we wanted to give it more of a thump and modernise it a bit".

Here are those live dates:

13 Oct: London, Electric Brixton
14 Oct: Manchester, The Ritz
15 Oct: Glasgow, Barrowlands

Listen to 'The First Big Weekend Of 2016' on Spotify here.

The Vaccines, Opeth, In Flames, more

Other notable announcements and developments today...

• The Vaccines have extended their record deal with Sony/Columbia for two more albums. They have begun recording their fourth album already, which will be the first without drummer Pete Robertson, who has left the band, it was also announced this morning.

• Opeth have signed to Nuclear Blast and will release their twelfth album, 'Sorceress', through the label later this year. "The decision was made in [Nuclear Blast boss] Markus Staiger's ridiculously potent Porsche going at 150mph somewhere in the south of Germany", says frontman Mikael Åkerfeldt. That doesn't sound like a good time to be negotiating a contract at all.

• In Flames have also signed to Nuclear Blast outside North America, returning to the label for the first time since 2008's 'A Sense Of Purpose'. No word on what sort of car the deal was agreed in, but Anders Fridén says: "Both [the band and the label] started in a garage in Europe, both love metal and both have grown a lot bigger over the years".

• BlackBritishMusic has announced that it will launch new initiative RE:IMI (Race Equality: In Music Industry) at the House Of Commons on 12 Jul. More information and tickets here.

• A live version of Björk's 'Vulnicura' album will be released on 15 Jul. Have a look at the different physical versions here.

• Just in case you thought that that last track they released was an accident, The Avalanches have released another. Here's 'Colours'. New album 'Wildflower' is out on 8 Jul.

• Trentemøller has announced he'll release new album 'Fixion' on 16 Sep. He'll also play a UK show at the Islington Assembly Hall on 18 Sep.

• Boris have uploaded a previously unreleased track from the upcoming tenth anniversary edition of their 'Pink' album. This is 'SOFUN'.

• Bishop Nehru has released the video for 'Midnight Reflecting' from his 'Magic 19' mixtape.

• Murcof and Vanessa Wagner will release an album of reinterpretations of music by artists including John Cage and Aphex Twin on 23 Sep, titled 'Statea'. Here's their version of Arvo Part's 'For Alina: Variations For The Healing Of Arinushka'.

• Ekkah have released the video for new track 'The Space Between Us'.

CMU Beef Of The Week #310: Pop v Brexit (Round 5)
Yes, I told you this would happen, and it has. In fact, it's been quite a busy week for pop-related EU referendum news. Something I'm sure you're as pleased about as I am.

First up, it's our old friend Bpoplive, which is due to take place this Sunday. Or it was. It's not now, because it's been cancelled. But before you start assuming that this was because the line-up wasn't strong enough to fill a 15,000 arena, stop. There's nothing wrong at all with a line-up featuring The Drifters, Alexander O'Neal and an Elvis impersonator, headlined by three former members of Bucks Fizz and a man conveniently named Bobby. Especially when two previous line-ups have dropped out in their entirety.

Sure, the fact that the ticket price was slashed from £23 to £5 earlier this week might look like sales weren't going very well - with 1000 tickets reportedly being given away for free - but that is no indication of why the event was cancelled.

No, it was cancelled because of the bloody Electoral Commission, which Leave.EU's Andy Wigmore accused of "pursuing a spiteful vendetta" against the event. This mainly involved attempting to confirm that the show was being put on within the rules governing campaign spending. The bastards.

"After insisting we tick all sorts of superfluous boxes and fill in various time-wasting forms in triplicate, we received a final demand for more information 'by 5pm on Wednesday [or] we will issue a disclosure notice under Schedule 19B, Paragraph 1 of PPERA'", Wigmore told the Telegraph, noting that this came with a warning that failing to provide this information could be a "criminal offence".

He continued: "Despite our best efforts, the constant pressure and repeated threats have finally killed off what should have been a great event for our dedicated and hard-working supporters".

You'll notice that Wigmore is talking as if he's somehow involved with the event there, even though he and Leave.EU have repeatedly said that Bpoplive was a non-political venture merely endorsed by the anti-EU campaign, with no direct involvement from the organisation itself. It was, we were told, definitely "NOT a political rally" but more a neutral Rock The Vote-style event to enthuse young people to vote, whatever their views. Although at the same time it was billed as "the biggest campaign rally in modern British political history" featuring "speeches from leading personalities and politicians who support leaving the EU".

Now that it's all off though, Wigmore - who at this point seems to be identifying as Bpoplive's Event Co-ordinator - said: "This promised to be a truly unique event, with a live orchestra, a little tongue-in-cheek entertainment and speeches from Nigel Farage and other leading lights of the Leave campaign. It was intended as a huge and well-deserved 'thank you' to all of our supporters; a celebration of their extraordinary efforts in this referendum".

That live orchestra seems to be a fairly recent addition to the line-up, apparently due to play the big finale of the event. Although when announcing the ticket price cut earlier in the week, Wigmore did say he didn't know how big the orchestra would be, as he has "absolutely no idea what an orchestra is meant to look like".

So, some good event co-ordination there. But anyway, that doesn't matter, because it's all the Electoral Commission's fault that it's been called off.

In its own statement, the election overseer said: "The Commission has not requested or suggested that the event cannot or should not take place. As part of the Commission's monitoring we identified an event that had it proceeded would need to comply with the rules on referendum campaign spending".

"As we would in any such matter, we contacted the event organisers regarding the costs and administration of the event and have been awaiting a response to outstanding queries on this. It is important that the campaign spending rules are followed properly", it added.

Nevertheless, Leave.EU chairman Arron Banks, who was bankrolling the event's apparent £500,000 budget, had some tough words for the Electoral Commission, saying that the body had a "long record of general incompetence".

"After 23 Jun we will be taking aggressive action to ensure the wider public comes to share that opinion", he added. "They are not fit for purpose, utterly incompetent and have overseen the transformation of the Britain's electoral process into a circus worthy of a corrupt banana republic".

It's not all bad news though, ticketholders can either have a refund or hold onto their tickets to gain access to a new event in September. And just imagine what that show's line-up could be!

One of the speakers due to appear at Bpoplive was Nigel Farage, who was involved in the other pop-related referendum ding dong this week. It was among the most ridiculous of all the things to happen during a very silly period of campaigning: the UKIP leader found himself in some sort of mini water-bound battle against Bob Geldof.

In his latest publicity stunt, Farage led a flotilla of fishing vessels up the Thames to coincide with Prime Minister's Questions, protesting EU fishing regulations.

It was already fairly impressive that Farage had managed to make the event at all, given that he only once made it to any of the 42 meetings of the European Parliament Fisheries Committee that took place during the three years he was a member of it, and he failed to vote on improvements to the Common Fisheries Policy on three occasions. But, hey, if he actually did his job in the European Parliament, what would he have to complain about?

The thing he had to complain about this week though, apart from his own failings as a politician, was a rival flotilla captained by Bob Geldof, who blasted Farage's boats with a massive soundsystem and shouted "you're no fisherman's friend" at him. Farage responded by called Geldof a "crap popstar" who had "come to laugh at the poor people". The pro-EU boat was squirted with a hose.

Greenpeace previously noted that one of the vessels in the Brexit flotilla was co-owned by a man convicted of large scale fishing fraud (in which said ship was involved) and a multi-million pound fishing firm, accusing Farage of "cynically exploiting the legitimate anger of many British fishermen for political gain", saying that "the distribution of fishing rights within the UK's fleet is entirely the responsibility of the UK's fisheries minister".

As a side note, Farage also reportedly told a journalist that he'd started smoking again because he felt that "the doctors have got it wrong on smoking".

Which I think brings us nicely back to just how daft this whole episode was. I mean, the idea that a flotilla - A FLOTILLA - is a good way to get people on board with anything. And then an aging rocker staging a mock attack on that flotilla (how many times can I say 'flotilla' before it loses all meaning? Possibly once was enough) is hardly the peak of political debate. I'm sure Geldof was thinking something along the lines of The Sex Pistols playing 'God Save The Queen'. It was a bit more like, well, Bob Geldof standing on a boat shouting.

So there you have it. For a full account of all that went down, the Telegraph's Michael Deacon saw it all from Farage's side.

And that's it for this week's pop-style Brexit beefing. Good luck next Thursday, I think we're going to need it.

 
ANDY MALT | Editor
Andy heads up the team, overseeing the CMU bulletins and website, coordinating features and interviews, reporting on artist and business stories, and contributing to the CMU Approved column.
Email andy@unlimitedmedia.co.uk (except press releases, see below)
   
CHRIS COOKE | MD & Business Editor
Chris provides music business coverage and analysis. Chris also leads the CMU Insights training and consultancy business and education programme CMU:DIY, and heads up CMU publisher 3CM UnLimited.
Email chris@unlimitedmedia.co.uk (except press releases, see below)
   
SAM TAYLOR | Commercial Manager & Insights Associate
Sam oversees the commercial side of the CMU media, leading on sales and sponsorship, and advising on CMU Insights training courses and events.
Email sam@unlimitedmedia.co.uk or call 020 7099 9060
   
CARO MOSES | Co-Publisher
Caro helps oversee the CMU media, while as a Director of 3CM UnLimited she heads up the company's other two titles ThisWeek London and ThreeWeeks Edinburgh, and supports other parts of the business.
Email caro@unlimitedmedia.co.uk
Send ALL press releases to musicnews@unlimitedmedia.co.uk - this is checked daily by the whole editorial team meaning your release will definitely get to the right person.

For details of the training and consultancy services offered by CMU Insights click here - Andy and Chris are also available to provide music business comment, just email them direct.

To promote your company or advertise jobs or services to the entire UK music industry via the CMU bulletin or website contact Sam on 020 7099 9060 or email ads@unlimitedmedia.co.uk
© UnLimited Media, a division of 3CM Enterprises Ltd

CMU, UnLimited Media, Kemp House, 152 City Road, London EC1V 2NX
t: 020 7099 9050 (editorial) 020 7099 9060 (sales)

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