FRIDAY 5 AUGUST 2016
TODAY'S TOP STORY: America's Department Of Justice has confirmed that it doesn't see any need to reform the consent decrees that govern collective licensing in the US, but that – under its reading of the current rules – collecting societies BMI and ASCAP should start doing 100% licensing. The music industry's official response to all this? "Fuck the fuck off". Well, I'm para-phrasing slightly. But only... [READ MORE]
 
TODAY'S APPROVED: The Eastern Electrics festival over there at Hatfield House packs a serious punch this year, but after it's all done and dusted, why not head back into the capital for this after party, one of two officially endorsed by the event? Big hitter Steve Lawler teams up with Dense & Pika, Matt Tolfrey, Waifs & Strays and PBR Streetgang on what is a very fine bill indeed, as does Geddes, who... [READ MORE]
 
BEEF OF THE WEEK: Weird Al Yankovic has parodied the songs of anybody who's anybody over the last 40 years. If you've written a massive hit, then chances are he's piggybacked off your music at some point. And you loved it, didn't you? Well, except James Blunt, whose manager once responded to a request to approve a rework of 'You're Beautiful' - retitled 'You're Pitiful' - with an email saying... [READ MORE]
   
CMU TRENDS: We all know the digital pie debate, but there is another discussion to be had about the way streaming income is shared out, focused less on how the stakeholders in any one track divvy up the money, and more on how streaming monies are shared across the music industry. Start-up SupaPass brings this debate to the fore. Find out why in this free-to-access sample CMU Trends article. [READ MORE]
TOP STORIES Music industry plans fight back as Department Of Justice confirms consent decree conclusion
JUMP | ONLINE
LEGAL BREIN continues assault on prolific individual file-sharers
CORE Media hits out at Simon Fuller's intervention in its bankrupcty
JUMP | ONLINE
DEALS Professor Green signs to Relentless Records
BMG buys Altitude Music
JUMP | ONLINE
DIGITAL & D2F SERVICES Crowdmix bought by main Crowdmix backer
JUMP | ONLINE
RELEASES Liima release Olympics-themed mini-documentary as Russians music video
JUMP | ONLINE
AWARDS David Bowie the bookies' favourite to win the Mercury Prize
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ONE LINERS RAJARs, Britney Spears, Tove Lo, more
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AND FINALLY... CMU Beef Of The Week #317: Prince v Weird Al Yankovic
JUMP | ONLINE
 
Click JUMP to skip direct to a section of this email or ONLINE to read and share stories on the CMU website (JUMP option may not work in all email readers). For regular updates from Team CMU follow us on Twitter, Facebook or Tumblr.
 
 
THRILL JOCKEY - PRINT & ONLINE PUBLICIST (LONDON)
Thrill Jockey Records is seeking a passionate and enthusiastic print and online publicist to be based out of our East London office. The ideal candidate must be able to work with established artists, and developing new and emerging artists from a diverse spectrum of musical genres/styles.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
KOBALT MUSIC GROUP – DIGITAL SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGER (LONDON)
Kobalt is looking for a highly motivated individual to join our AWAL UK Operations Team, based in our London office. The Digital Supply Chain Manager will be responsible for maintaining and enhancing AWAL’s supply chain performance across audio and video platforms, ensuring timely and accurate delivery of content.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
BLEEP - JUNIOR MARKETING MANAGER (LONDON)
Bleep is looking for a junior marketing manager who will be primarily responsible for devising and implementing marketing strategies for Bleep.com with three key aims: customer acquisition, brand-building, and customer engagement.

or more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
FREE TRADE AGENCY - RECEPTIONIST/OFFICE MANAGER (LONDON)
Free Trade Agency is a busy live music booking agency, working with many world renowned artists. We are currently looking to fill the position of Receptionist / Office manager. The successful candidate will have a great opportunity to learn the workings of the live music industry.

or more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
9PR - ACCOUNT MANAGER (LONDON)
We’re looking for an Account Manager with at least two years experience in print and online publicity. Our campaigns range from up-and-coming-talent, established acts, catalogue releases and events across a variety of genres.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
eONE MUSIC UK - DIRECTOR (LONDON)
This exciting new position reporting to the President of eOne Music requires a dynamic self-starter to head the UK music division to represent our remarkable client roster across all divisions of label, management and publishing and liaise with our TV, film and family divisions.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
KILIMANJARO LIVE - TICKETING MANAGER (LONDON)
Kilimanjaro Live are recruiting a Ticketing Project Manager to join their existing team of two. The individual will take full responsibility for specific shows and tours from set-up, through the sales period and to settlement post show.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   

LOCOMOTION ENTERTAINMENT - OFFICE MANAGER / PA TO MANAGING DIRECTOR (LONDON)
Locomotion is hiring an Office manager / PA to the Managing Director for our growing management and music publishing business based in Soho, London. The role forms a key part of our team and would suit a self-motivated forward-thinking individual with exceptional organisational skills and attention to detail in the dealings with artists, producers, executives and business partners.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.

   
KARTEL - MARKETING MANAGER (LONDON)
Kartel Music Group is recruiting a Marketing Manager to complement its existing product management, distribution and internal promotions team. The role will be involved in a cross section of sales and marketing activity within the management, label and artist services sector.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
X-RAY TOURING - AGENT ASSISTANT (LONDON)
The role of Agent Assistant is crucial, having responsibility for creating and delivering key documentation to ensure a smooth process from show/tour confirmation to show/tour completion. The assistant helps to manage the main administrative process in delivering shows to the highest possible standard on time and without error.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
END OF THE ROAD - FINANCE MANAGER (LONDON)
End Of The Road Festival is seeking a Finance Manager to work full time in its East London office, very much at the heart of the company, reporting to the Managing Director. This is an important job in a young company and would ideally lead to posting as the Finance Director.

For more information including a full job description and how to apply click here.
   
BIMM GROUP - TUTORS (LONDON, BRIGHTON, BRISTOL, MANCHESTER, DUBLIN, BERLIN)
Calling experienced music industry professionals to join our talented tutor roster at the British And Irish Modern Music Institute. Now with over 5500 students studying at six fully connected BIMM colleges, we are again actively recruiting to appoint new specialist music industry tutors to join our roster – especially in the subject areas of music business, event management and music journalism.

For more information and details on how to apply click here.
 
CMU Jobs is a proven way to recruit the best music business talent for roles across the industry at all levels, from graduate to senior management. To book an ad contact Sam on 020 7099 9060 or email ads@unlimitedmedia.co.uk
 
 
A guide to upcoming events from and involving CMU, including seminars, masterclasses and conference sessions from CMU Insights and workshops from CMU:DIY, plus other events where CMU journalists are speaking or moderating.
 
26 Sep 2016 CMU Insights Masterclass: Music Business Explained – For Start Ups & Brands
CLICK FOR INFO
27 Sep 2016 CMU Insights @ Music 4.5: The Politics Of Licensing
CLICK FOR INFO
Oct/Nov 2016 CMU Insights Seminars Programme: How The Music Business Works
CLICK FOR INFO
3 Oct 2016 CMU Insights Seminar: Making Money From Music
CLICK FOR INFO
10 Oct 2016 CMU Insights Seminar: How Music Rights Work
CLICK FOR INFO
17 Oct 2016 CMU Insights Seminar: How Music Licensing Works
CLICK FOR INFO
24 Oct 2016 CMU Insights Masterclass: From Napster To Now – The Battle With Music Piracy
CLICK FOR INFO
24 Oct 2016 CMU Insights Seminar: The Music Rights Sector
CLICK FOR INFO
31 Oct 2016 CMU Insights Seminar: Merch, Live & Brands
CLICK FOR INFO
7 Nov 2016 CMU Insights Seminar: Building A Fanbase - Social Media Tools
CLICK FOR INFO
14 Nov 2016 CMU Insights Seminar: Building A Fanbase - Music Media
CLICK FOR INFO
21 Nov 2016 CMU Insights Masterclass: Digital Deals, Dollars And Trends – Explained!
CLICK FOR INFO
21 Nov 2016 CMU Insights Seminar: Building A Fan Orientated Business
CLICK FOR INFO
 

Music industry plans fight back as Department Of Justice confirms consent decree conclusion
America's Department Of Justice has confirmed that it doesn't see any need to reform the consent decrees that govern collective licensing in the US, but that – under its reading of the current rules – collecting societies BMI and ASCAP should start doing 100% licensing. The music industry's official response to all this? "Fuck the fuck off". Well, I'm para-phrasing slightly. But only very slightly.

As much previously reported, it was the music publishers which wanted the rules regulating the collective licensing of song rights Stateside to be reformed. There were various proposed reforms on the agenda, but a key priority was partial withdrawal, which would allow music publishers to license radio, bars, cafes and venues through their collecting societies BMI and ASCAP, but at the same time force digital services like Pandora into doing direct deals with each music publisher separately. That isn't currently possible under the consent decrees.

But the DoJ – which oversees the consent decrees – hasn't been persuaded by the arguments for reform. Instead it has focused on the 100% licensing point. Because songs are often co-written, they are also often co-owned. And because in the US songwriters must choose which collecting society they want to represent their performing rights - BMI, ASCAP or the smaller SESAC or GMR - that often means multiple societies represent the same song, each specifically controlling a different slice of the same copyright.

In most countries, where you have co-owned works a licensee must do separate deals with each individual owner, in a process that is sometimes called fractional licensing. Though in the US, with direct licensing, in theory any one co-owner can do a deal on behalf of all the other co-owners without actually consulting them, providing they share any income. This is called 100% licensing.

But agreements between co-owners often stop 100% licensing from happening even in direct dealing. And in collective licensing, as far as the publishers and songwriters are concerned, it has always been the case that – if BMI and ASCAP each own half a song – then you need licences from both to legally make use of that work.

But not so says the DoJ. "As our investigation proceeded" said the government agency yesterday, "we discovered that there was significant disagreement in the industry about what rights must be conveyed by the blanket licences that the consent decrees require ASCAP and BMI to offer"

Putting both sides of the argument, it continued: "Some argued that, in order to effectuate the purpose of the consent decrees, the blanket licence must grant licensees the right to publicly perform all songs in the ASCAP and BMI repertories. Others believe that the blanket licences offered by ASCAP and BMI instead confer only rights to the fractional interests in songs owned by ASCAP's and BMI's members and that music users must obtain separate licences to the remaining fractional interests before playing the songs".

But, crucially, the DoJ concluded that "we think the evidence favours the full-work side". Which means that, in theory, BMI and ASCAP should now start to evolve their operations to be able to deal with the delivery of 100% licensing, while the smaller societies – which are not governed by the consent decrees – nevertheless need to work out what portion of their catalogue could now be licensed by their bigger rivals through a 100% licence.

But the US music community, which has been hitting out at these proposals ever since BMI and ASCAP were briefed about what the DoJ had concluded back in June, isn't planning on giving way on this point without a fight. The two societies have announced that they plan to work together in a bid to block 100% licensing and to continue to push for regulatory reform. BMI will do this by fighting the DoJ through the courts, while ASCAP will focus on lobbying Washington, noting the department's own conclusion that new legislation might be better equipped to regulate music licensing than the old fashion consent decrees.

In a joint statement yesterday, BMI and ASCAP said: "United in their belief that the DoJ's decision to mandate 100% licensing will cause unnecessary chaos in the marketplace and place unfair financial burdens and creative constraints on songwriters and composers, the two organisations are pursuing a joint campaign: BMI through litigation and ASCAP through legislative reform".

They added: "BMI today announced it is taking legal action and has initiated the process to challenge 100% licensing in federal court. Concurrently, ASCAP announced that it will take the lead for the two PROs in pursuing a legislative solution to ensure the continued availability of fractional licensing as well as other remedies to the outdated consent decree regulations that disadvantage songwriters and composers in the digital age. In its recent public statement, the DoJ itself called for potential legislative relief".

Commenting further, BMI CEO Mike O'Neill added: "The DoJ's interpretation of our consent decree serves no one, not the marketplace, the music publishers, the music users, and most importantly, not our songwriters and composers who now have the government weighing in on their creative and financial decisions".

He went on: "Unlike the DoJ, we believe that our consent decree permits fractional licensing, a practice that encourages competition in our industry and fosters creativity and collaboration among music creators, a factor the DoJ completely dismissed. As a result, we have no recourse other than to fight the DoJ's interpretation in court. It won't be easy, and we know it will take time, but we believe that it is the right thing to do and in the best interest of the industry at large".

Meanwhile, ASCAP boss Elizabeth Matthews added: "The DoJ decision puts the US completely out of step with the entire global music marketplace, denies American music creators their rights, and potentially disrupts the flow of music without any benefit to the public. That is why ASCAP will work with our allies in Congress, BMI and leaders within the music industry to explore legislative solutions to challenge the DoJ's 100% licensing decision and enact the modifications that will protect songwriters, composers and the music we all love".

It remains to be seen what response the two societies now get, in both the courts and Congress. Efforts at copyright law reform in the latter could also seek to evolve the US compulsory licences that have created issues in the digital domain in recent years, which would be a sensible move. Though any significant legislative reform is going to be time consuming, even without the strong tech and broadcast lobbies in Washington who will almost certainly oppose many of the music industry's proposals.

In the meantime, here are people commenting on the DoJ's decision – on both 100% licensing and other reforms - from both sides of the debate...

Marty Bandier, boss of the world's biggest music publisher Sony/ATV: "We are extremely disappointed by the DoJ's decision to issue a misguided and unprecedented interpretation of the consent decrees that is contrary to how they have worked and how the business has operated over many decades. Not only does it contradict the views of the US Copyright Office and the entire music industry, but it will bring significant uncertainty and disorder to a marketplace that has worked well for years, while leaving everybody in the licensing process, including songwriters, to try to figure out how 100% licensing might work. Instead of modernising the consent decrees, this decision has created a host of problems that will now have to be addressed by the courts and must be addressed by Congress as well".

Gadi Oron, Director General of the global body for collecting societies, CISAC: "The global community of creators and societies represented by CISAC is bemused and extremely worried by the consequences of the decisions made by the Department Of Justice. These decisions have been made without taking into account the interests of creators and with total disregard for the international legal framework that authors' societies operate within. ASCAP and BMI have decided to jointly challenge these decisions. We fully support and stand by their actions. We hope that their actions will lead to a fairer US licensing system that would work for all stakeholders".

Michael Beckerman, boss of the tech lobby repping Internet Association: "The internet industry applauds the DoJ's decision regarding the ASCAP and BMI consent decrees. Competitive dynamics in the music licensing industry are more problematic today than when the consents were first put into place, making the case for the consents stronger than ever before. ASCAP and BMI's market power is at an all time high and should not be left unfettered. The legal certainty and the careful guidance provided by DoJ maps out helpful rules of the road regarding access to creative works. This is particularly relevant for music delivered through the internet, which must be afforded fair and equal treatment by all actors in the digital music ecosystem. We are pleased that the DoJ Antitrust Division agrees with our position and we commend its common sense decision".

The MIC Coalition, which brings together various groups of music licensees, including broadcasters, net firms, and bar and restaurant chains: "The MIC Coalition applauds the Department Of Justice Antitrust Division for completing a thorough, multi-year review of the longstanding voluntary consent decrees governing ASCAP and BMI after consideration of extensive input from music publishers, music users and the PROs themselves. The decision to maintain current protections against anti-competitive behaviour ensures that even though ASCAP and BMI control more than 90% of the US music marketplace, music licensees can continue to access music under a system that fairly compensates music creators for their work"

BREIN continues assault on prolific individual file-sharers
Dutch anti-piracy group BREIN continues in its newly charged bid to target individual file-sharers with the news that a man who shared 18,000 music files via Usenet has agreed to stop doing that, and to pay 15,000 euros in damages for past copyright infringement.

BREIN confirmed earlier this year that it was planning to go after particularly prolific uploaders of unlicensed content on various file-sharing and other online networks. This was after it had secured an injunction in the Dutch courts against a specific KickassTorrents uploader that would have fined the man 2000 euros a day for every day he continued to make unlicensed content available for download.

According to Torrentfreak, the latest file-sharer targeted by BREIN told other Usenet users that he would no longer be sharing any music online as a result of his settlement with the anti-piracy group. If he breaks his commitment to stop file-sharing, he could face an additional fine of up to 50,000 euros.

The Usenet user wrote: "This morning I was 'honoured' with a visit from the bailiff on behalf of BREIN. To cut a long story short, I am sentenced to pay a hefty sum of money for my work as a spotter / poster. Perhaps there are people who would just continue, but I'm out".

Confirming that its renewed efforts to target illegal file-sharers would extend beyond conventional file-sharing platforms, to networks like Usenet, BREIN director Tim Kuik says: "BREIN previously announced that it would expand its actions against illegal uploaders. This doesn't only affect BitTorrent uploaders as in previous cases this year, but also uploaders to Usenet and file-hosters or cyberlockers".

He went on: "In addition to the present case, there are still more investigations ongoing. We don't warn illegal uploaders, but immediately offer them a settlement. If someone does not want to settle, a court proceeding will follow, to recover the full damages and costs".

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CORE Media hits out at Simon Fuller's intervention in its bankrupcty
A spokesman for 'Idol' owner CORE Media has commented on a legal filing made earlier this week by the talent show franchise's original creator Simon Fuller, criticising the industry veteran for trying to interfere with the firm's chapter eleven bankruptcy proceedings.

As previously reported, CORE is the TV company that began life as CKX, the former business of Robert FX Sillerman. It acquired Fuller's 19 Entertainment company in 2005 and with it both the 'Idol' franchise and another TV show he created, 'So You Think You Can Dance'.

Both Sillerman and Fuller left the company after a few years, though the latter continued to consult on the TV franchises he had helped created. Then earlier this year CORE announced it was applying for bankruptcy protection in the US, reportedly after Fuller demanded that millions in allegedly unpaid consulting fees be paid.

The company has been working its way through the so called chapter eleven proceedings ever since, but Fuller intervened in that process earlier this week, seemingly unhappy with the plans that have been made to take the company out of bankruptcy.

He filed an ex parte motion with the bankruptcy court seeking access to information about CORE Media's affairs, while raising the prospect of future claims over alleged fraudulent transfers and breach of fiduciary duty.

But CORE has accused Fuller of trying to interfere with plans made by the "official committee" that was charged with the task of restructuring the business in order to take it out of bankruptcy and assure the media company's long-term future.

A spokesman told CMU yesterday: "After extensive investigation and constructive negotiations, CORE Media is pleased with the agreement it successfully reached with its official committee acting on behalf of the unsecured creditors. Mr Fuller's attempt to circumvent the process and disregard the work of the official committee is disappointing. CORE Media remains focused on its upcoming plan confirmation and the swift completion of its restructuring".

It remains to be seen how the court responds to Fuller's motion.

Professor Green signs to Relentless Records
Professor Green has signed a new record contract with Sony's Relentless Records. The deal reunites him with the label's president Shabs Jobanputra, who signed the rapper to Virgin Records in 2010.

"Shabs was first out of the blocks for a second time round", says Professor Green. "It's great to be back in the hands of someone fair, forward thinking and committed".

Meanwhile, a spokesperson for Relentless said in a quote, placed in the penultimate paragraph of a press release (and now this article about it) to officially confirm that Professor Green had indeed signed to the label: "We can confirm that Professor Green has now signed to Relentless Records on an exclusive contract".

Great work. Professor Green is set to release new material through the label later this year.

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BMG buys Altitude Music
BMG was yesterday "delighted", obviously, to announce it had acquired production music company Altitude Music, a purchase that will further expand the music rights firm's own production music business.

The deal to acquire UK-based Altitude, the catalogue of which has been used by both broadcasters and advertisers, also includes its sister company Must Save Jane, which provides music to movies and trailers. Altitude will continue to be based out of its recording studio in Shoreditch, and will continue to work with its roster of composers, producers and musicians, while tapping into all things BMG to grow its customer base.

Says BMG EVP UK Alexi Cory-Smith: "We're delighted to welcome Altitude's highly successful team to BMG as well as integrating the company's catalogue of music into our business. Altitude's skilled and passionate team will now have the benefit of BMG's reach and resources worldwide and we look forward to helping them achieve even greater success in this exciting sector of the music industry".

Meanwhile Altitude director Caspar Kedros added: "We are super excited to be able to begin the next stage of Altitude's journey with BMG. We value their commitment to being a new kind of artist friendly music company. This deal means we can continue to grow, whilst keeping the focus on our composers' creativity and talent".

Crowdmix bought by main Crowdmix backer
So Crowdmix has been bought everybody! By the owner of Crowdmix. So that's fun. At least he won't be able to complain when he realises he's bought an entirely pointless product.

As you all surely remember, Crowdmix was the social network for music that no one wanted, but which got everyone talking about a year ago as the start-up started proactively pitching its in-development app around the music industry.

Having built up lots of hype, hired lots of people and haemorrhaged lots of cash, the company went into administration last month in what was probably one of the least surprising developments in the music industry since we started covering the damn thing in 1998.

But once in administration the company was put up for sale and, according to Business Insider, a buyer has been found. Though it's billionaire property tycoon Nick Candy, who was already the main investor in the start-up, having invested a reported £8 million in the business at the point it went under.

It's thought that Candy and the Crowdmix founder still involved in the venture - Gareth Ingham - hope that, with a significantly stripped back operation, they can still make a go of the business. Plenty of suggestions have been made as to what went wrong first time – especially in these pieces in Business Insider and Music Ally – and many of those issues could be addressed by a take-two management team.

Though there still remains the key problem: that no one has as yet explained to me why the world needs a social network for music.

  Vigsy's Club Tip: Eastern Electrics After Party
The Eastern Electrics festival over there at Hatfield House packs a serious punch this year, but after it's all done and dusted, why not head back into the capital for this after party, one of two officially endorsed by the event?

Big hitter Steve Lawler teams up with Dense & Pika, Matt Tolfrey, Waifs & Strays and PBR Streetgang on what is a very fine bill indeed, as does Geddes, who seems to be rising fast.

On top of that lot, the loft looks pretty good too, with Derek Dahlarge, Normski, Miina and Two And Eight all on board. And it all runs through to 9am, making it a damn good way to maximise the EE experience.

Saturday 6 Aug, Egg Ldn, 200 York Way, London, N7 9AX, 11pm-9am, £10 in advance, more info at www.egglondon.co.uk
CLICK HERE to read and share online
 

Liima release Olympics-themed mini-documentary as Russians music video
Just in time for the 2016 Olympics in Rio, and all the Russia-related controversy surrounding it, Liima have released a new music video that doubles up as a mini-documentary about the 1980 Games in Moscow, where over 60 countries boycotted the event.

The song for which the video was made, 'Russians', was based on an orchestral sample the band took from an unnamed piece of music they found. Later it turned out that the composition was written by Russian composer Aleksandra Pakhmutova for the 1980 Moscow Olympic Games opening ceremony.

The group worked with directors Jonas Bang and MILK on the video. "The Olympic Games is a peace movement, an arena for nations to compete and show greatness through sport performances rather than war and politics", say the directors.

"But just as in 1980, politics has a habit of muddying those honest intentions. So with the upcoming games in Rio and the personal disaster for the numerous Russian athletes banned due to a state-organised doping scheme, we felt it was time for a reminder to keep the Olympics pure and honour its peace-positive values. Remember that it is the athletes who pay the price of nations' political games".

'Russians' is taken from 'ii', the debut album by Liima, a band made up of Efterklang and percussionist Tatu Rönkkö. Watch the video here.

David Bowie the bookies' favourite to win the Mercury Prize
So, as the Mercury Prize shortlist was unleashed yesterday, the bookies named David Bowie the favourite to take the album of the year award.

Though the bookies were certain that Remain was going to win in the European Referendum, and look how that turned out. The Mercury panel will probably now vote to leave the world of music altogether and give the prize to a garden shed in Basingstoke instead. Which, frankly, would be a much more interesting outcome.

Presumably those putting their pounds on Bowie to win are hoping that the Mercury judging panel won't be able to resist the temptation to use their prize to pay tribute to one of the true greats of British music. And it was a pretty damn decent final album, of course.

But - even though the Leave-voting British public have been given some token-gesture input this year – the Mercury judging panel has a habit of shunning the obvious, except when shunning the obvious would be the obvious thing to do. So who knows? I think things are still looking pretty good for that shed.

Anyway, here are the odds Ladbrokes were offering yesterday...

David Bowie - Blackstar - 2/1
Radiohead - A Moon Shaped Pool - 5/1
Anohni – Hopelessness - 5/1
Skepta – Konnichiwa - 8/1
Michael Kiwanuka - Love & Hate - 10/1
The 1975 - I Like It ... -12/1
Kano - Made In The Manor - 12/1
Laura Mvula - The Dreaming Room - 16/1
Savages - Adore Life - 16/1
Bat For Lashes - The Bride - 16/1
The Comet Is Coming - Channel The Spirits - 25/1
Jamie Woon - Making Time - 25/1

RAJARs, Britney Spears, Tove Lo, more

Other notable announcements and developments today...

• 6Music continues to grow its audience according to the latest RAJAR radio listening figures, which also recorded a bad quarter for Radio 1. Interested in RAJARs beyond the always talked about BBC national stations? Well, read this analysis from radio expert Matt Deegan then. That's what I'd do. In fact I did.

• Britney Spears will release here ninth album 'Glory' on 26 Aug. Here's the first single, 'Make Me...'

• Tove Lo has released new single 'Cool Girl', taken from her forthcoming second album, details of which are still to be announced.

• Crystal Castles will release new album 'Amnesty (I)' on 19 Aug. Here's the video for 'Char'.

• Crocodiles have released the video for new single 'Telepathic Lover'. Their new album, 'Dreamless', is out on 21 Oct, and they'll be in the UK touring in October too.

• Kishi Bashi has released 'Hey Big Star', the second single from new album 'Sonderlust', which is out on 16 Sep.

• Roch has released the video for recent single 'Vienna'. "For Vienna I wanted a slow, flat, up close and personal video portrait", she says. "I chose a few minutes out of a long single camera shot I took". Have a watch here.

• Carina Round plays The Lexington in London tonight. Her latest album, 'Deranged To Divine', was released last week.

CMU Beef Of The Week #317: Prince v Weird Al Yankovic
Weird Al Yankovic has parodied the songs of anybody who's anybody over the last 40 years. If you've written a massive hit, then chances are he's piggybacked off your music at some point. And you loved it, didn't you?

Well, except James Blunt, whose manager once responded to a request to approve a rework of 'You're Beautiful' - retitled 'You're Pitiful' - with an email saying: "Both James and I will never approve this parody to be released on any label".

Because, you see, Yankovic does get permission from the original writers of the songs he parodies before releasing his own versions. Which is nice of him, given that under the parody provisions of US copyright law he might well be able to get away with not bothering. But he doesn't want to merely get away with it. He wants approval. And that is why you have never heard a Weird Al Yankovic version of a song by famous naysayer Prince.

In an interview with People this week, Yankovic revealed that he'd had various ideas for joke reworks of Prince songs, but they'd always been knocked back. He'd hoped that things would change at some point, or that maybe he'd come up with a funny version of a new Prince song that the musician would actually like. But now Prince is dead. In many ways, Weird Al Yankovic has been hit harder than anyone by the death.

"It's too bad", says Yankovic. "I hadn't approached him in about 20 years because he always said no, but I had this fantasy that he'd come out with a new song, I'd have a great idea, he'd finally say yes and it would erase decades of weirdness between us. But that's obviously not going to be the case".

Yes, a man who has the word 'weird' in his name was worried about weirdness. Of course, another person Prince had a weird relationship with was Michael Jackson, who was parodied by Yankovic four times in his lifetime.

"Michael Jackson wasn't just cool about my parody of 'Beat It', but he also loved my version of 'Bad', which was 'Fat'", says Yankovic. "He even let me use the actual 'Bad' subway set for the 'Fat' video. He was very supportive, which was huge with opening the doors with other artists. Because if Michael Jackson signed on, you couldn't really say no".

Just think, if Prince hadn't been such a humourless curmudgeon, he could have had one of his songs turned into something as hilariously funny as 'Fat', which contains the actual lyrics, "The pavement cracks when I fall down / I've got more chins than Chinatown".

Shamone. But, hey, we should at least hear Weird Al out. Maybe he really did have some great ideas for reworking those Prince songs. "I had a parody of 'Let's Go Crazy' that was about 'The Beverly Hillbillies'", he explains, getting off to a bad start. "And I wanted to do something funny with 'When Doves Cry', and 'Kiss'. For '1999', I wanted to do an infomercial where you could get anything you wanted by dialling 1-800-something-1999".

To be honest, if that was the actual pitch he gave to Prince, it's easy to see why he wasn't keen. Though that 'Beverly Hillbillies' idea was later recycled for Yankovic's take on 'Money For Nothing' by Dire Straits, so we can get an idea of what might have been:

Yeah.

 
ANDY MALT | Editor
Andy heads up the team, overseeing the CMU bulletins and website, coordinating features and interviews, reporting on artist and business stories, and contributing to the CMU Approved column.
Email andy@unlimitedmedia.co.uk (except press releases, see below)
   
CHRIS COOKE | MD & Business Editor
Chris provides music business coverage and analysis. Chris also leads the CMU Insights training and consultancy business and education programme CMU:DIY, and heads up CMU publisher 3CM UnLimited.
Email chris@unlimitedmedia.co.uk (except press releases, see below)
   
SAM TAYLOR | Commercial Manager & Insights Associate
Sam oversees the commercial side of the CMU media, leading on sales and sponsorship, and advising on CMU Insights training courses and events.
Email sam@unlimitedmedia.co.uk or call 020 7099 9060
   
CARO MOSES | Co-Publisher
Caro helps oversee the CMU media, while as a Director of 3CM UnLimited she heads up the company's other two titles ThisWeek London and ThreeWeeks Edinburgh, and supports other parts of the business.
Email caro@unlimitedmedia.co.uk
Send ALL press releases to musicnews@unlimitedmedia.co.uk - this is checked daily by the whole editorial team meaning your release will definitely get to the right person.

For details of the training and consultancy services offered by CMU Insights click here - Andy and Chris are also available to provide music business comment, just email them direct.

To promote your company or advertise jobs or services to the entire UK music industry via the CMU bulletin or website contact Sam on 020 7099 9060 or email ads@unlimitedmedia.co.uk
© UnLimited Media, a division of 3CM Enterprises Ltd

CMU, UnLimited Media, Kemp House, 152 City Road, London EC1V 2NX
t: 020 7099 9050 (editorial) 020 7099 9060 (sales)

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